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United States Arms Sales Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
April 24, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton administration officials who decided in the spring of 1994 not to object to Iranian arms shipments to Bosnia were faced with a "military urgency" and a strategic "imbalance in favor of the Bosnian Serb forces" that threatened the survival of the Bosnian Muslim government, a senior State Department official told Congress on Tuesday.
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NEWS
April 24, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton administration officials who decided in the spring of 1994 not to object to Iranian arms shipments to Bosnia were faced with a "military urgency" and a strategic "imbalance in favor of the Bosnian Serb forces" that threatened the survival of the Bosnian Muslim government, a senior State Department official told Congress on Tuesday.
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NEWS
August 10, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the high-tech laser warning systems on their tanks to the mighty MIG-21 bombers in their air force, the Croatians have been masters at flouting an international arms embargo imposed against the republics of the former Yugoslav federation. This month's powerful onslaught on the Serb-held Krajina region in Croatia is the latest evidence. But for the neighboring republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina, where war has dragged on the longest, the arms embargo has proven to be a more complicated matter.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the high-tech laser warning systems on their tanks to the mighty MIG-21 bombers in their air force, the Croatians have been masters at flouting an international arms embargo imposed against the republics of the former Yugoslav federation. This month's powerful onslaught on the Serb-held Krajina region in Croatia is the latest evidence. But for the neighboring republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina, where war has dragged on the longest, the arms embargo has proven to be a more complicated matter.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, under continuing congressional criticism for its handling of foreign policy, narrowly averted a major rebuke in the Senate on Friday when it defeated legislation that would have required the lifting of the Yugoslav arms embargo. The Senate split 50-50 over a Republican measure that would have directed President Clinton to ignore the United Nations and end U.S.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | Reuters
The U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly Thursday to urge the Clinton Administration to end the U.S. arms embargo against Bosnia-Herzegovina. The non-binding resolution also said the United States should provide "appropriate military assistance" if requested by the Muslim government. The vote was 87-9. The vote came after calls for an end to the embargo for the sake of "human decency" and after criticism of "inaction and paralysis" by the world community. The U.N.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest congressional revolt over President Clinton's handling of foreign policy, the House voted by a large margin Thursday to require the Administration to unilaterally lift an embargo on arms sales to Bosnia-Herzegovina. The vote was 244 to 178; 117 Democrats lined up against the White House, while 132 supported the President. After the vote, the White House said that, while Clinton favors lifting the U.N.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has ordered the U.S. military to stop enforcing the United Nations arms embargo against Bosnia-Herzegovina, officials said Thursday--a largely symbolic action but one that has drawn private protests from U.S. allies in Europe. Under the new policy, which goes into effect Saturday, U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the strongest rebuffs yet of President Clinton's authority in foreign policy, the Senate voted, 69 to 29, Wednesday to lift an embargo on sales of arms to participants in the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Despite strong pressure from the White House to oppose the measure, 21 Democrats joined all but five Republicans to create enough of a margin to override a presidential veto, which Clinton has promised. "It is not about politics," said Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) brushed aside a last-ditch request by President Clinton and reopened debate Tuesday on legislation to force the Administration to end its embargo on the sale of arms to combatants in Balkan warfare. Dole and others who favor lifting the embargo, which critics say puts the Muslim-led government of Bosnia-Herzegovina at a severe disadvantage, appear to have a clear majority in the Senate.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the strongest rebuffs yet of President Clinton's authority in foreign policy, the Senate voted, 69 to 29, Wednesday to lift an embargo on sales of arms to participants in the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Despite strong pressure from the White House to oppose the measure, 21 Democrats joined all but five Republicans to create enough of a margin to override a presidential veto, which Clinton has promised. "It is not about politics," said Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) brushed aside a last-ditch request by President Clinton and reopened debate Tuesday on legislation to force the Administration to end its embargo on the sale of arms to combatants in Balkan warfare. Dole and others who favor lifting the embargo, which critics say puts the Muslim-led government of Bosnia-Herzegovina at a severe disadvantage, appear to have a clear majority in the Senate.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration has ordered the U.S. military to stop enforcing the United Nations arms embargo against Bosnia-Herzegovina, officials said Thursday--a largely symbolic action but one that has drawn private protests from U.S. allies in Europe. Under the new policy, which goes into effect Saturday, U.S.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, under continuing congressional criticism for its handling of foreign policy, narrowly averted a major rebuke in the Senate on Friday when it defeated legislation that would have required the lifting of the Yugoslav arms embargo. The Senate split 50-50 over a Republican measure that would have directed President Clinton to ignore the United Nations and end U.S.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest congressional revolt over President Clinton's handling of foreign policy, the House voted by a large margin Thursday to require the Administration to unilaterally lift an embargo on arms sales to Bosnia-Herzegovina. The vote was 244 to 178; 117 Democrats lined up against the White House, while 132 supported the President. After the vote, the White House said that, while Clinton favors lifting the U.N.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | Reuters
The U.S. Senate voted overwhelmingly Thursday to urge the Clinton Administration to end the U.S. arms embargo against Bosnia-Herzegovina. The non-binding resolution also said the United States should provide "appropriate military assistance" if requested by the Muslim government. The vote was 87-9. The vote came after calls for an end to the embargo for the sake of "human decency" and after criticism of "inaction and paralysis" by the world community. The U.N.
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