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United States Arms Sales Middle East

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NEWS
March 13, 1992 | Associated Press
The United States dominated arms sales to the Middle East last year, accounting for nearly two-thirds of the weapons flow into the region despite pledges of restraint, an international research group said. U.S. sales to the region in the wake of the Persian Gulf War edged over $3 billion in 1991, said the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, far eclipsing all other arms suppliers. The figure marked an increase from the $2.8-billion figure posted in 1990. Primary U.S.
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NEWS
March 13, 1992 | Associated Press
The United States dominated arms sales to the Middle East last year, accounting for nearly two-thirds of the weapons flow into the region despite pledges of restraint, an international research group said. U.S. sales to the region in the wake of the Persian Gulf War edged over $3 billion in 1991, said the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, far eclipsing all other arms suppliers. The figure marked an increase from the $2.8-billion figure posted in 1990. Primary U.S.
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NEWS
May 2, 1988
The Reagan Administration wants to increase arms sales abroad by $3.3 billion this year to more than $15 billion, the New York Times reported. The newspaper said that a confidential report from the State Department to Congress lists potential sales to 33 countries, including $3.6 billion to Israel, $3.3 billion to South Korea and $2.7 billion to Egypt.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We may be arriving at the end of an era of easy arms control," a Bush Administration official mused last week, contemplating the completion of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. "The kind of arms control we'll be looking at from now on is going to seem hard by comparison." Negotiating START wasn't easy, of course--the 750-page agreement took nine years, two U.S. Presidents and four Soviet leaders to achieve.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We may be arriving at the end of an era of easy arms control," a Bush Administration official mused last week, contemplating the completion of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. "The kind of arms control we'll be looking at from now on is going to seem hard by comparison." Negotiating START wasn't easy, of course--the 750-page agreement took nine years, two U.S. Presidents and four Soviet leaders to achieve.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, defending its plans for major new weapons sales to Persian Gulf states, told Congress on Thursday that such deals help rather than hurt U.S. efforts to promote stability and stem weapons proliferation in the volatile Middle East. Insufficient weapons in the hands of pro-American states helped cause the Gulf War and could set the stage for future conflicts if the issue is not addressed, Assistant Secretary of Defense Henry S.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi officials denied Sunday that the electronic devices seized in a U.S.-British sting operation last week were to be used in nuclear weapons, saying they were instead purchased for unspecified industrial uses. "Iraq has neither the capability nor the wish to produce nuclear weapons," Nizar Hamdoon, Iraq's deputy foreign minister, said Sunday. He suggested that Iraq sought the U.S.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | The Times' Washington staff
CHANGING CLIMATE: The White House is stiffening its resolve in criticizing Israel for continuing to make settlements on the West Bank over U.S. complaints that they are jeopardizing American peace efforts in the Middle East. In the past, the congressional backlash against criticism of Israel has been so vehement that the Administration has been forced to abandon any hard-line stand early on.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | JIM MANN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his triumphal postwar speech to Congress early this month, President Bush said it would be "tragic" if the nations of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf were to embark upon a new arms race. Yet the chances are now excellent that there will soon be an explosion of new weapons sales to the Middle East.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House approved a two-year, $25-billion foreign aid bill that sets out a plan to halt the Middle East arms race, including a freeze on U.S. sales of major weapons systems in the region. The plan would freeze sales until another supplier nation breaks the moratorium or until the U.S. program is replaced with multinational restraints.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House approved a two-year, $25-billion foreign aid bill that sets out a plan to halt the Middle East arms race, including a freeze on U.S. sales of major weapons systems in the region. The plan would freeze sales until another supplier nation breaks the moratorium or until the U.S. program is replaced with multinational restraints.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, defending its plans for major new weapons sales to Persian Gulf states, told Congress on Thursday that such deals help rather than hurt U.S. efforts to promote stability and stem weapons proliferation in the volatile Middle East. Insufficient weapons in the hands of pro-American states helped cause the Gulf War and could set the stage for future conflicts if the issue is not addressed, Assistant Secretary of Defense Henry S.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first steps of a major new drive to arm allies in the Persian Gulf, the Bush Administration plans to sell Apache attack helicopters to the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain in the coming weeks, defense officials said. The Emirates, which allowed the basing of American C-130s during the Persian Gulf War, is expected to buy 20 of the choppers that proved so lethal during Operation Desert Storm, the officials said.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | The Times' Washington staff
CHANGING CLIMATE: The White House is stiffening its resolve in criticizing Israel for continuing to make settlements on the West Bank over U.S. complaints that they are jeopardizing American peace efforts in the Middle East. In the past, the congressional backlash against criticism of Israel has been so vehement that the Administration has been forced to abandon any hard-line stand early on.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The powerful Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday recommended a ban on arms sales to U.S. allies such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates unless they pay up on their multibillion-dollar pledges to help defray American costs in the Persian Gulf War. The proposal, which the Senate is expected to ratify today when it approves a special Operation Desert Storm money bill, reflects congressional impatience with the pace of collections on pledges of $53.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | JIM MANN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his triumphal postwar speech to Congress early this month, President Bush said it would be "tragic" if the nations of the Middle East and the Persian Gulf were to embark upon a new arms race. Yet the chances are now excellent that there will soon be an explosion of new weapons sales to the Middle East.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The powerful Senate Appropriations Committee on Monday recommended a ban on arms sales to U.S. allies such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates unless they pay up on their multibillion-dollar pledges to help defray American costs in the Persian Gulf War. The proposal, which the Senate is expected to ratify today when it approves a special Operation Desert Storm money bill, reflects congressional impatience with the pace of collections on pledges of $53.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American pilots dodging missiles and antiaircraft fire in the skies over Iraq and Kuwait are learning a distressing reality of the Middle East: Some of the weapons endangering their lives were made by allies, and a few were even manufactured in the United States. It is a lesson that other fighting forces have learned over the years in a region whose per capita military spending is three times the world average.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American pilots dodging missiles and antiaircraft fire in the skies over Iraq and Kuwait are learning a distressing reality of the Middle East: Some of the weapons endangering their lives were made by allies, and a few were even manufactured in the United States. It is a lesson that other fighting forces have learned over the years in a region whose per capita military spending is three times the world average.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi officials denied Sunday that the electronic devices seized in a U.S.-British sting operation last week were to be used in nuclear weapons, saying they were instead purchased for unspecified industrial uses. "Iraq has neither the capability nor the wish to produce nuclear weapons," Nizar Hamdoon, Iraq's deputy foreign minister, said Sunday. He suggested that Iraq sought the U.S.
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