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United States Arms Sales Nicaragua

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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, extending a nine-month cease-fire with the U.S.-backed Contras, on Tuesday urged a meeting of Central American presidents to revive peace efforts before President-elect George Bush takes office in January. Ortega accused the Reagan Administration of blocking the meeting and was adamant that Nicaragua would not drop a two-year-old World Court suit against Honduras that has been a major obstacle to such a Central American summit.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The special prosecutor in the Iran-Contra scandal has accused two aides to then-Vice President George Bush of "acts of concealment" to cover up White House links to secret arms shipments to Central America, sources familiar with the prosecutor's final report said Wednesday. In his upcoming report, prosecutor Lawrence E. Walsh says Bush aides Donald P. Gregg and Samuel J. Watson knew that the White House was involved in secret weapons shipments to Nicaraguan rebels.
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NEWS
March 28, 1988 | Associated Press
An adviser to House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) tried to sell weapons to the Contras through Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's private network three months before the Iran-Contra disclosures ended the North operation, a letter proposing the sale said. Richard M. Pena, a former House Foreign Affairs Committee staff member, contacted North associate Richard R. Miller in 1986 offering materiel from two South American companies.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, extending a nine-month cease-fire with the U.S.-backed Contras, on Tuesday urged a meeting of Central American presidents to revive peace efforts before President-elect George Bush takes office in January. Ortega accused the Reagan Administration of blocking the meeting and was adamant that Nicaragua would not drop a two-year-old World Court suit against Honduras that has been a major obstacle to such a Central American summit.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
His name is almost unpronounceable, and his face is hardly familiar. But if the FBI maintained a "Ten Most Wanted Terrorists" list, Imad Mughniyah's name would be at the top. "Mughniyah is the single most dangerous terrorist at large today," says Oliver B. Revell, the FBI's executive assistant director for investigations. "Since 1983, he has been the most virulent and most dangerous terrorist acting against U.S. interests in the Middle East." So far, according to U.S.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The special prosecutor in the Iran-Contra scandal has accused two aides to then-Vice President George Bush of "acts of concealment" to cover up White House links to secret arms shipments to Central America, sources familiar with the prosecutor's final report said Wednesday. In his upcoming report, prosecutor Lawrence E. Walsh says Bush aides Donald P. Gregg and Samuel J. Watson knew that the White House was involved in secret weapons shipments to Nicaraguan rebels.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
His name is almost unpronounceable, and his face is hardly familiar. But if the FBI maintained a "Ten Most Wanted Terrorists" list, Imad Mughniyah's name would be at the top. "Mughniyah is the single most dangerous terrorist at large today," says Oliver B. Revell, the FBI's executive assistant director for investigations. "Since 1983, he has been the most virulent and most dangerous terrorist acting against U.S. interests in the Middle East." So far, according to U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | Associated Press
An adviser to House Speaker Jim Wright (D-Tex.) tried to sell weapons to the Contras through Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's private network three months before the Iran-Contra disclosures ended the North operation, a letter proposing the sale said. Richard M. Pena, a former House Foreign Affairs Committee staff member, contacted North associate Richard R. Miller in 1986 offering materiel from two South American companies.
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