Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Arms Sales Pakistan
IN THE NEWS

United States Arms Sales Pakistan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton Administration proposal to ship F-16 jets to Pakistan, despite that country's suspected nuclear weapons program, is raising Indian hackles and pumping even more venom into already embittered relations on the subcontinent. From the Pakistani point of view, if America does not allow delivery of the high-performance fighters, for which Pakistan has already paid more than $900 million by U.S. count, it is no better than a double-dealer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has approved a major arms delivery to Pakistan and resumed granting government-subsidized loans and loan guarantees for U.S. exports to China--two signs that Washington will not severely punish either country for China's sale of equipment that could be used in Pakistan's nuclear weapons program.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has approved a major arms delivery to Pakistan and resumed granting government-subsidized loans and loan guarantees for U.S. exports to China--two signs that Washington will not severely punish either country for China's sale of equipment that could be used in Pakistan's nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, praising Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto for helping the United States combat terrorism and drug trafficking, said Tuesday that he will ask Congress to soften the law banning U.S. aid and arms sales to Pakistan because of its nuclear weapons program. "I intend to ask Congress to show some flexibility . . . so that we can have some economic and military cooperation," Clinton said after almost three hours of talks with Bhutto at the White House.
NEWS
March 17, 1988
The Reagan Administration has notified Congress that it plans to sell 75 F-16 jet fighters to Israel, four to Bahrain and an unspecified number to Pakistan. A classified report covering projected arms sales for 1988, sent to Congress Feb. 25, also said that the United States plans to equip Egypt's six Soviet-built submarines with U.S. torpedoes and radar. Egypt also would be sold an unspecified number of M-60 tanks, while Pakistan would get P-3 Orion submarine-hunting aircraft.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Pakistan, long troubled by India's naval buildup, has struck a deal to lease up to eight of the 16 U.S. Navy frigates that are being retired for budgetary reasons, officials said Friday. The ships being offered to Pakistan are Garcia and Brooke class frigates built in the mid-1960s. Lt. Barbara Kent, a Navy spokeswoman, said Congress on Thursday was informed of the deal in a letter from Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, the Navy's chief of legislative affairs.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Defense Secretary William J. Perry began a two-day visit to Pakistan, Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto on Tuesday demanded that the United States deliver F-16s ordered by Pakistan or refund $650 million her country has already paid. "We would like either the equipment or the money back," Bhutto told reporters. Delivery of the state-of-the-art jet fighters has been blocked by the Pressler Amendment, invoked in 1990, which requires a cutoff of U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
The Bush Administration said it plans to proceed with the sale of 60 F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan for $1.5 billion despite questions in Congress about the arms race between Pakistan and India. The Defense Department announced that Congress has been notified of the offer, which becomes official in 30 days unless it is rejected by U.S. lawmakers. Pakistan has already bought 51 F-16s in a first step to replace its aging fleet of 135 Chinese-built fighters.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, praising Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto for helping the United States combat terrorism and drug trafficking, said Tuesday that he will ask Congress to soften the law banning U.S. aid and arms sales to Pakistan because of its nuclear weapons program. "I intend to ask Congress to show some flexibility . . . so that we can have some economic and military cooperation," Clinton said after almost three hours of talks with Bhutto at the White House.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In unusually strong language, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee charged Friday that the State Department has knowingly violated federal law by permitting commercial sales of arms to Pakistan. "Many in the State Department are aware that commercial sales to Pakistan do violate the law," said Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.), a co-sponsor of the 1985 law that bars sales of military equipment to Pakistan while that nation is developing nuclear weapons.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Defense Secretary William J. Perry began a two-day visit to Pakistan, Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto on Tuesday demanded that the United States deliver F-16s ordered by Pakistan or refund $650 million her country has already paid. "We would like either the equipment or the money back," Bhutto told reporters. Delivery of the state-of-the-art jet fighters has been blocked by the Pressler Amendment, invoked in 1990, which requires a cutoff of U.S.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton Administration proposal to ship F-16 jets to Pakistan, despite that country's suspected nuclear weapons program, is raising Indian hackles and pumping even more venom into already embittered relations on the subcontinent. From the Pakistani point of view, if America does not allow delivery of the high-performance fighters, for which Pakistan has already paid more than $900 million by U.S. count, it is no better than a double-dealer.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
India's foreign minister cautioned Tuesday that revelations of continued U.S. arms sales to Pakistan have distressed his country and are forcing it to reassess its national security. J. N. Dixit, the foreign minister, said he plans to discuss the sales with U.S. officials and will seek an explanation. But he told reporters at a breakfast session that he will not protest the policy permitting the sales.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In unusually strong language, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee charged Friday that the State Department has knowingly violated federal law by permitting commercial sales of arms to Pakistan. "Many in the State Department are aware that commercial sales to Pakistan do violate the law," said Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.), a co-sponsor of the 1985 law that bars sales of military equipment to Pakistan while that nation is developing nuclear weapons.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite a ban on military sales to Pakistan by the U.S. government, the Bush Administration has quietly permitted the Pakistani armed forces to buy American-made arms from commercial firms for the last year and a half, according to classified documents and Administration officials. Among the military items licensed for sale to Pakistan are spare parts for American-made F-16 fighter planes, which form the nucleus of Islamabad's air force, Administration officials confirmed.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
The Bush Administration said it plans to proceed with the sale of 60 F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan for $1.5 billion despite questions in Congress about the arms race between Pakistan and India. The Defense Department announced that Congress has been notified of the offer, which becomes official in 30 days unless it is rejected by U.S. lawmakers. Pakistan has already bought 51 F-16s in a first step to replace its aging fleet of 135 Chinese-built fighters.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
India's foreign minister cautioned Tuesday that revelations of continued U.S. arms sales to Pakistan have distressed his country and are forcing it to reassess its national security. J. N. Dixit, the foreign minister, said he plans to discuss the sales with U.S. officials and will seek an explanation. But he told reporters at a breakfast session that he will not protest the policy permitting the sales.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite a ban on military sales to Pakistan by the U.S. government, the Bush Administration has quietly permitted the Pakistani armed forces to buy American-made arms from commercial firms for the last year and a half, according to classified documents and Administration officials. Among the military items licensed for sale to Pakistan are spare parts for American-made F-16 fighter planes, which form the nucleus of Islamabad's air force, Administration officials confirmed.
NEWS
August 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Pakistan, long troubled by India's naval buildup, has struck a deal to lease up to eight of the 16 U.S. Navy frigates that are being retired for budgetary reasons, officials said Friday. The ships being offered to Pakistan are Garcia and Brooke class frigates built in the mid-1960s. Lt. Barbara Kent, a Navy spokeswoman, said Congress on Thursday was informed of the deal in a letter from Rear Adm. Thomas C. Lynch, the Navy's chief of legislative affairs.
NEWS
March 17, 1988
The Reagan Administration has notified Congress that it plans to sell 75 F-16 jet fighters to Israel, four to Bahrain and an unspecified number to Pakistan. A classified report covering projected arms sales for 1988, sent to Congress Feb. 25, also said that the United States plans to equip Egypt's six Soviet-built submarines with U.S. torpedoes and radar. Egypt also would be sold an unspecified number of M-60 tanks, while Pakistan would get P-3 Orion submarine-hunting aircraft.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|