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United States Arms Sales Saudi Arabia

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NEWS
November 26, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel's confidence that the global focus on the Persian Gulf conflict would improve its relations with the United States has given way to pervasive anger at the Bush Administration for being kept at arm's length during the crisis. Mistrust deepened during President Bush's trip last week to Saudi Arabia and Egypt and because of his meeting with Syrian President Hafez Assad in Switzerland. Bush skipped Israel on his tour of the Middle East, as did Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
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NEWS
February 14, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blow to the U.S. aerospace industry, Saudi Arabia has informed the United States that it will not try this year to buy 102 F-16 jet fighters in a deal worth up to $15 billion, Pentagon officials said Thursday. The Saudis are delaying any purchase out of anger at the Israeli reaction to their plans and advance publicity about them, U.S. sources said. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expressed alarm this week over the possible sale.
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NEWS
August 10, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite their reluctance to be drawn into a U.S.-directed military confrontation with Iraq, Turkish leaders on Thursday assured Secretary of State James A. Baker III that U.S. forces could use strategic Turkish bases if war breaks out, a Bush Administration official said. In the event of full-scale hostilities, "I am confident we can count on our allies the Turks," the official told reporters on Baker's plane after Baker met with Turkish President Turgut Ozal and other leaders.
NEWS
January 31, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Saudi Arabian military is preparing a request to buy 102 F-16 fighter jets from the United States worth between $5 billion and $15 billion, industry and diplomatic officials said. Some industry executives and diplomatic officials speculated that the Saudis are timing the application to calm U.S. anger over what the Justice Department calls their lack of cooperation in the investigation of the truck bombing in June that killed 19 U.S. airmen.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudis to Restructure Arms Payments: Saudi Arabia has signed an agreement under which the cash-strapped nation will restructure $9.2 billion in payments due over the next two years to five American defense contractors, U.S. defense officials said. The deal could also clear the way for a reported plan by the Saudis to buy $6 billion in commercial airliners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) launched a preemptive strike Wednesday against the possible sale of 72 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia. Berman is a leading congressional supporter of Israel, which has consistently opposed the sale of sophisticated weapons to Saudi Arabia. Berman, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, held a news conference to denounce tactics that McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bush Administration said it plans to sell Saudi Arabia more than $4-billion worth of light armored vehicles, TOW anti-tank missiles and modernization packages for five AWACs surveillance planes. If Congress doesn't object within 30 days, the sale goes through. In the formal pre-notice period during which the proposal was made known to members of Congress, no objections were raised. The plan is in addition to an earlier $6-billion offer to sell battle tanks to the Saudis.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
With opposition to an arms sale of more than $20 billion to Saudi Arabia emerging in Congress, the Saudi government served notice Thursday that it will buy weapons elsewhere if the United States backs away from an earlier decision to make the sale. "Saudi Arabia is going to increase its long-term defense forces, and the question is not whether the arms will be bought, but where they will be bought," said Fred Dutton, a longtime Washington representative of the Saudi government. "If the U.S.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee met privately with Saudi Arabian Ambassador Bandar ibn Sultan the week before last, they thought they were in for a routine update on events in the Persian Gulf. What the Saudi prince told them, however, was about a stunning development here in the nation's capital: The Bush Administration had decided to sell Saudi Arabia more than $20 billion in advanced weapons--the biggest single arms transfer in history. California Rep.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Saudis to Restructure Arms Payments: Saudi Arabia has signed an agreement under which the cash-strapped nation will restructure $9.2 billion in payments due over the next two years to five American defense contractors, U.S. defense officials said. The deal could also clear the way for a reported plan by the Saudis to buy $6 billion in commercial airliners.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Israeli government on Sunday protested the Bush Administration's plans to sell 72 high-performance F-15XP warplanes to Saudi Arabia and said it will insist that the United States honor its longstanding commitment to maintain Israel's qualitative military edge in the Middle East.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush urged a note of tolerance on the Rev. Pat Robertson's Christian Coalition on Friday night, telling the organization that in his emphasis on "family values," he was not passing judgment on the sort of families that make up American society.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another offer of political largess, President Bush intends to hand-deliver a major reward to Missouri's aircraft industry today by announcing that his Administration will approve a major sale of 72 advanced F-15 fighters to Saudi Arabia, sources said Thursday. The $5-billion contract is expected to save thousands of jobs for workers at the St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, sketching the limits of his newly proclaimed partnership with President Bush, said Wednesday that his government will object strongly if the United States attempts to sell advanced F-15 warplanes to Saudi Arabia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Rep. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) launched a preemptive strike Wednesday against the possible sale of 72 fighter jets to Saudi Arabia. Berman is a leading congressional supporter of Israel, which has consistently opposed the sale of sophisticated weapons to Saudi Arabia. Berman, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, held a news conference to denounce tactics that McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what would be the largest military sale in U.S. history, the Bush Administration plans to sell Saudi Arabia about $20 billion worth of advanced jets, tanks and other weapons to help bolster the major U.S. ally against future Persian Gulf aggression, U.S. officials said Friday night.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, encouraged by an international backlash against raids by Iraqi troops on Western diplomatic compounds in Kuwait, said Saturday that it is discussing with other countries new ways to punish the Baghdad regime for its actions. "We continue to consult with France and our other friends on further possible steps to bring home to Iraq the costs of its aggression, including tightening of the sanctions in all possible ways," the White House said in a statement.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | Reuters
Despite its international push to dampen the Middle East arms race, the Bush Administration on Tuesday announced plans to sell an additional $1.88 billion in weapons and military support to Saudi Arabia. The Pentagon said Congress has been notified of the latest package, which ranges from helicopter-borne rockets to medical evacuation helicopters and maintenance of F-15 fighter jets. Congress has 30 days to rule on the sale.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia transferred U.S. military equipment to Iraq in 1986 and to Syria and Bangladesh after the end of the Persian Gulf War last year without the required approval from the United States, the State Department said Monday. In all three cases, the Saudis told U.S. officials that the transfers were inadvertent and offered assurances that such transfers would not be repeated, said Richard Boucher, deputy spokesman at the State Department.
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