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United States Arms Sales South Korea

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NEWS
June 30, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Chairman Thomas V. Jones, two other executives and the company itself are the subjects of a criminal investigation into payments made to Korean firms as part of the company's unsuccessful effort to sell its F-20 fighter jet, according to a reliable source. The three men were ordered to testify before a federal grand jury in Los Angeles and the company was ordered to produce documents related to its Korean deals, Northrop disclosed Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
South Korean authorities Monday arrested a Seoul businessman in connection with $3.5 million he received from Northrop to help sell the F-20 jet fighter, accusing him of criminal violations of the country's foreign exchange laws. The arrest of Lee Min Ha, chairman of a company Northrop hired as its sales agent in South Korea, marks the first formal government charges growing out of the controversial foreign payments that Northrop made between 1984 and 1986.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Agreements made by Northrop with two Korean organizations to help sell the F-20 jet fighter were not in compliance with Northrop's own internal corporate rules and policies, according to internal company documents and former corporate executives. Even before the two deals went sour and Northrop lost $7.
NEWS
September 23, 1988
The United States plans to sell South Korea $238 million worth of jet fighters, aircraft spare parts and air-to-air missiles, the Reagan Administration told Congress. The equipment is not considered controversial, and the sale is expected to become official in 30 days unless Congress objects. The package includes 12 F-4C Vietnam War-era jets with electronic-countermeasures equipment to help protect them in battle, the Pentagon said.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States plans to sell 24 F-4E jet fighter planes to South Korea for $182 million, the Reagan Administration told Congress on Wednesday. The aircraft, upgraded versions of F-4 Phantom jets used during the Vietnam War, will be sold from excess U.S. Air Force stock.
NEWS
September 23, 1988
The United States plans to sell South Korea $238 million worth of jet fighters, aircraft spare parts and air-to-air missiles, the Reagan Administration told Congress. The equipment is not considered controversial, and the sale is expected to become official in 30 days unless Congress objects. The package includes 12 F-4C Vietnam War-era jets with electronic-countermeasures equipment to help protect them in battle, the Pentagon said.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
South Korean authorities Monday arrested a Seoul businessman in connection with $3.5 million he received from Northrop to help sell the F-20 jet fighter, accusing him of criminal violations of the country's foreign exchange laws. The arrest of Lee Min Ha, chairman of a company Northrop hired as its sales agent in South Korea, marks the first formal government charges growing out of the controversial foreign payments that Northrop made between 1984 and 1986.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Amid a widening federal probe of two of Northrop's South Korean business deals, it has been learned that the company signed two other agreements to make payments to powerful Korean political broker Park Chong Kyu. Although Northrop has said it did not know it was dealing with Park in the two deals that had previously come to light, the company was directly paying Park $6,500 per month as a consultant in 1984, it was learned.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
When Northrop sought to hire a consultant in 1983 with influential connections in the South Korean government and a shrewd understanding of international arms trading, it went to Jimmy K. Shin. Shin, known in Honolulu as a gregarious and high-stakes operator who drives a Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, was put on the Northrop payroll for $102,000 per year to help sell the company's F-20 jet fighter to South Korea. But Shin, a former bar owner with a checkered past, was not the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Amid a widening federal probe of two of Northrop's South Korean business deals, it has been learned that the company signed two other agreements to make payments to powerful Korean political broker Park Chong Kyu. Although Northrop has said it did not know it was dealing with Park in the two deals that had previously come to light, the company was directly paying Park $6,500 per month as a consultant in 1984, it was learned.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Chairman Thomas V. Jones, two other executives and the company itself are the subjects of a criminal investigation into payments made to Korean firms as part of the company's unsuccessful effort to sell its F-20 fighter jet, according to a reliable source. The three men were ordered to testify before a federal grand jury in Los Angeles and the company was ordered to produce documents related to its Korean deals, Northrop disclosed Wednesday.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
When Northrop sought to hire a consultant in 1983 with influential connections in the South Korean government and a shrewd understanding of international arms trading, it went to Jimmy K. Shin. Shin, known in Honolulu as a gregarious and high-stakes operator who drives a Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, was put on the Northrop payroll for $102,000 per year to help sell the company's F-20 jet fighter to South Korea. But Shin, a former bar owner with a checkered past, was not the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Agreements made by Northrop with two Korean organizations to help sell the F-20 jet fighter were not in compliance with Northrop's own internal corporate rules and policies, according to internal company documents and former corporate executives. Even before the two deals went sour and Northrop lost $7.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | From Reuters
The United States plans to sell 24 F-4E jet fighter planes to South Korea for $182 million, the Reagan Administration told Congress on Wednesday. The aircraft, upgraded versions of F-4 Phantom jets used during the Vietnam War, will be sold from excess U.S. Air Force stock.
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