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United States Arms Sales Taiwan

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NEWS
April 25, 2001 | HENRY CHU and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China lashed out Tuesday at the U.S. decision to sell the largest arms package in a decade to Taiwan and warned that it reserved the right to take retaliatory action. Only hours later, the Bush administration formally presented the arms offer, which includes four destroyers, eight submarines and a dozen aircraft, to a delegation from Taiwan. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S.
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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taiwan test-fired three American-made Patriot air defense missiles Wednesday in a move likely to increase tensions with mainland China, less than 100 miles across the Taiwan Strait. After the launch of an initial Patriot PAC-2 missile to check the weapon's operating systems early Wednesday, two others were fired at dummy targets--one a drone aircraft, the other a small, domestically produced missile, according to Taiwanese military sources.
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NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. missile sale to Taiwan includes an unusual condition: The weapons will not be handed over to the island unless China threatens an attack, a senior U.S. defense official said in Washington. The arrangement is designed to meet a U.S. arms export pledge to not introduce more offensive military capabilities into Asia. Taiwanese pilots will train with the missiles, designated the AIM-120C Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile, at U.S. ranges, the defense official said.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sino-U.S. tensions over Taiwan flared anew Wednesday as President Bush declared that the United States would do "whatever it took to help Taiwan defend herself" and said the deployment of American troops is "certainly an option" if China were to invade the island. But he quickly sought to correct any impression that the remarks constitute a departure from long-standing American policy, which is deliberately vague on how the U.S. would help Taiwan.
NEWS
March 21, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration has scaled back its annual package of weapons sales to Taiwan to avoid exacerbating tensions with China, U.S. officials said Wednesday. After an annual review of Taiwan's defense needs, U.S. officials agreed to sell Taipei an unspecified number of Stinger antiaircraft missiles, an advanced targeting and navigation system for jet fighters and a package of electronic warfare equipment.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration recently cleared the way for Taiwan to buy the components of Patriot missiles from the United States to upgrade its air defenses against China, according to Pentagon and defense industry officials. The action was not publicly announced, but a spokesman for Raytheon Corp. acknowledged that the Bush Administration on Dec. 9 awarded an export license authorizing the U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a middle ground between angering China and helping Taiwan, President Bush has decided to sell Taiwan older destroyers, diesel submarines, sub-hunting aircraft and a new version of Patriot air defense missiles--but not the advanced radar system sought by the Taipei government, U.S. officials said Monday. However, the president intends to reconsider Taiwan's request next year, according to a top Republican senator who was briefed by Pentagon officials.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sino-U.S. tensions over Taiwan flared anew Wednesday as President Bush declared that the United States would do "whatever it took to help Taiwan defend herself" and said the deployment of American troops is "certainly an option" if China were to invade the island. But he quickly sought to correct any impression that the remarks constitute a departure from long-standing American policy, which is deliberately vague on how the U.S. would help Taiwan.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration and Congress privately reached an agreement last week that will open the way for hundreds of millions of dollars in new U.S. arms sales to Taiwan. Although China normally opposes such sales, the agreement was, in fact, a compromise that will prevent a further strain in relations between the United States and China. It will leave in effect a 12-year-old communique between the two nations in which the United States promised gradual reductions in arms exports to Taiwan.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first concrete response to China's increasing deployment of missiles in coastal areas, the Clinton administration has agreed to clear the way for Taiwan to buy an early warning radar system from the United States, according to administration and congressional sources. The decision, made Monday in a meeting with Taiwanese defense officials in Washington, would give Taiwan several minutes' warning if China was to launch either missiles or manned bombers across the Taiwan Strait.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | HENRY CHU and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
China lashed out Tuesday at the U.S. decision to sell the largest arms package in a decade to Taiwan and warned that it reserved the right to take retaliatory action. Only hours later, the Bush administration formally presented the arms offer, which includes four destroyers, eight submarines and a dozen aircraft, to a delegation from Taiwan. Chinese Ambassador to the U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staking out a middle ground between angering China and helping Taiwan, President Bush has decided to sell Taiwan older destroyers, diesel submarines, sub-hunting aircraft and a new version of Patriot air defense missiles--but not the advanced radar system sought by the Taipei government, U.S. officials said Monday. However, the president intends to reconsider Taiwan's request next year, according to a top Republican senator who was briefed by Pentagon officials.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, as the Clinton administration was trying to decide what weapon systems to sell to Taiwan, it suddenly found itself under intense pressure from one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) wanted the White House to let Taiwan buy advanced Aegis radar systems mounted on Arleigh Burke destroyers. And he wanted two of those warships to be built at Litton-Ingalls' shipyards in his hometown of Pascagoula, Miss.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taiwanese attack helicopters, missile boats and tanks pounded targets during war games Friday, days before Washington decides whether it will sell the island advanced weapons. Holding the live-fire drills so close to U.S.-Taiwan arms sales talks--scheduled to begin Tuesday in Washington--risked adding more tension to America's fragile relationship with China. Ties have already been strained by the April 1 collision between a U.S. spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet over the South China Sea.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China is dispatching its top foreign policy official to Washington next month in an apparent bid to talk the Bush administration out of approving new weapons for Taiwan during its first months in office. Vice Premier Qian Qichen's visit has not been announced, but a senior administration official confirmed it this week in response to a Times query. Qian's trip will represent the first high-level contact between China and the new administration.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. missile sale to Taiwan includes an unusual condition: The weapons will not be handed over to the island unless China threatens an attack, a senior U.S. defense official said in Washington. The arrangement is designed to meet a U.S. arms export pledge to not introduce more offensive military capabilities into Asia. Taiwanese pilots will train with the missiles, designated the AIM-120C Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile, at U.S. ranges, the defense official said.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
President-elect Chen Shui-bian on Friday defended a plan to push for a U.S. weapons deal that would likely raise tensions with rival China, saying the arms were essential for preserving peace. Since his election two weeks ago, Chen has tried not to rile Beijing. But the former Taipei mayor was not ready to placate Chinese leaders by suggesting that Washington postpone an annual decision expected later this month about selling weaponry to Taiwan.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is sending a top State Department official to Beijing early next week to explain to the Chinese leadership the President's decision to reverse 10 years of American policy by permitting the sale of U.S. F-16 warplanes to Taiwan, Administration sources said Wednesday. The official, Assistant Secretary of State William Clark Jr., will argue that the Administration is not violating a 1982 arms communique worked out between the United States and China.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
President-elect Chen Shui-bian on Friday defended a plan to push for a U.S. weapons deal that would likely raise tensions with rival China, saying the arms were essential for preserving peace. Since his election two weeks ago, Chen has tried not to rile Beijing. But the former Taipei mayor was not ready to placate Chinese leaders by suggesting that Washington postpone an annual decision expected later this month about selling weaponry to Taiwan.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
China demanded that the United States "correct its error" and immediately cancel plans to sell air defense equipment to Taiwan, which Beijing considers a breakaway province. Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhu Bangzao also urged Congress to grant China permanent low-tariff trade rights. President Clinton submitted legislation Wednesday to establish permanent normal trade relations with China.
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