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United States Assaults

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April 27, 1995 | JOSH MEYER and PAUL FELDMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Months before the horrific Oklahoma City bombing, law enforcement agents across the Central and Western states had become the targets of an escalating series of threats and attacks by militants bound by a common hatred for government authority, records and interviews show. Federal officials confirmed they have been alerted to at least a dozen confrontations since September, 1994, between suspected members of various heavily armed militia groups and federal, state and local authorities.
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NEWS
April 27, 1995 | JOSH MEYER and PAUL FELDMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Months before the horrific Oklahoma City bombing, law enforcement agents across the Central and Western states had become the targets of an escalating series of threats and attacks by militants bound by a common hatred for government authority, records and interviews show. Federal officials confirmed they have been alerted to at least a dozen confrontations since September, 1994, between suspected members of various heavily armed militia groups and federal, state and local authorities.
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NEWS
March 22, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cavernous courtroom was nearly empty, with only four spectators and reporters watching as a DNA expert patiently explained the techniques of his trade. Even the defendant, 32-year-old Moses Sithole, appeared bored. Smartly dressed in a double-breasted suit, he adjusted his gold-rimmed glasses and read a newspaper as the witness droned on. So goes the trial of the man accused of being South Africa's worst known serial killer.
SPORTS
October 1, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was part of the NHL's routine playlist--the body checks, the slams, the slashes. On the other hand, it wasn't: When former Boston Bruin defenseman Marty McSorley skated up from behind and slammed his hockey stick into the head of Vancouver opponent Donald Brashear, the Canuck player was left flat on the ice, his arms and legs trembling in convulsions. He woke up later with a Grade-3 concussion, blood streaming out of his nose, a bruise on his brain. Foul? Certainly. But criminal?
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