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November 17, 1989 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kelly Garrison knew the risk every time she ran down the runway toward the vaulting horse. She knew that proper timing and accuracy were a must in international gymnastics and that the slightest slip could mean the difference between winning and losing, or between winning and injury. But while training at the University of Oklahoma for the 1988 Olympics, Garrison decided to take an extra risk. Her hopes of making the team had been sinking, along with her vaulting scores.
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SPORTS
September 17, 2001 | Bill Plaschke
So the Dodgers open their doors and a community opens its eyes and everything is the same and nothing is the same. So now what? The Dodgers play host to the San Diego Padres tonight in the first major sports event here since Tuesday's terrorist attacks, the first game of the rest of their season. We can predict only the first 10 minutes. An L.A. policewoman named Rosalind Iams will sing the national anthem, and half of Dodger Stadium will weep.
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SPORTS
April 29, 1988 | MARYANN HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
A spokesman for the International Federation of Gymnastics (FIG) said Thursday that the sport's governing body is aware that countries make deals to fix scoring in competitions, but said the collaboration is difficult to police. "Everybody is aware of this thing, but no one can prove it," said Frank Edmond, vice president of FIG. Edmond, reached in Bristol, England, was responding to a claim by Greg Marsden, former U.S.
SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Is there room for two professional soccer leagues in the U.S.? Major League Soccer and the Women's United Soccer Assn. think so, but the proof will come only if MLS and WUSA cooperate. So far, tangible signs of such cooperation have been few and far between, but Saturday the picture changes. That's when three-time MLS champion D.C. United plays host to the San Jose Earthquakes at RFK Stadium in Washington, preceded by the Washington Freedom against the Boston Breakers.
SPORTS
October 2, 1994 | BOB OATES
Not even three months after the World Cup dominated U.S. sports pages, soccer has once again dipped low in the American consciousness. Now, soccer is trying to organize a major league here. It won't work. At World Cup time last summer, some Americans were caught up in a passing fancy. There was a fleeting interest in a sport that will never make it in this country for these, among other reasons: * Although it's a good children's sport--appealing to many youngsters in America and other lands--U.
SPORTS
July 5, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
The World Cup, soccer's most prestigious tournament and arguably the world's most popular sporting event, will come to the United States for the first time in 1994. The United States Soccer Federation (USSF) won the bid Monday by receiving 10 of the 19 votes cast in secret balloting by the Federation Internationale de Football Assn. (FIFA) executive committee. Morocco received seven votes and Brazil two.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Channel surfers are zapping from the weather in Denver to the financial ticker to "Little House on the Prairie" reruns and are stopping to watch corner kicks and wondering when Alexi Lalas is going to host "MTV Unplugged." Suddenly, there seems to be room on talk radio for soccer. True passion doesn't necessarily bloom overnight and no one expects U.S. stock markets to close during World Cup games, like they did in Brazil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1994 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the 1994 edition of the planet's most popular sporting event kicks off today in Chicago and Dallas, about 100,000 tickets remain for matches up to and including the championship final at the Rose Bowl July 17, World Cup '94 officials say. The unusual availability of over-the-counter tickets at this late date, particularly for the finals, may reflect a lingering apathy to the international soccer tournament among native-born Americans, who are serving as first-time hosts.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It may not be surprising that two pillars of 1980s-style, high-rolling investment--major league sports teams and movie studios--are declining in value today. But it's fascinating that experts in both sports and entertainment see fresh promise for their businesses in pay-per-view television.
SPORTS
July 1, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Michelle Akers where her gold medals are and the answer you'll get might be surprising. "The '91 one is framed with my jersey," she said, "and the gold Olympic one is just sitting in a drawer. When people ask me for it, I get it out, but otherwise that's just past. The memories are there."
SPORTS
April 1, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can a 19-year-old player with a broken rib be the salvation of Major League Soccer? If that seems too heavy a burden to put on the shoulders of Landon Donovan, perhaps he can split the load with other youngsters. DaMarcus Beasley will gladly take his share. So will Bobby Convey. Count on Edson Buddle to lend a hand. Jose Burciaga also is willing to help. And there are plenty of others.
SPORTS
December 19, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will make a formal bid to stage the third FIFA World Club Championship in 2003. The news was revealed, almost by accident, on Monday during a light-hearted exchange between Julio Grondona and Alan Rothenberg at Futbol de Primera's soccer symposium in Beverly Hills. Grondona, FIFA's senior vice president, was commenting on the increasingly comfortable relationship between world soccer's governing body and soccer leaders in the U.S.
SPORTS
November 10, 1999 | RICH ROBERTS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two questions were raised after the New York Yacht Club's Young America split amidships and almost sank in an America's Cup race against Nippon Challenge Tuesday: * Would skipper Ed Baird's team try to fix it or just switch to the newer boat they were planning to use later, anyway? * And . . . who's next? Baird said, "We're asking our designers all the time to make these boats light so they'll be fast and at the same time make them strong.
SPORTS
July 28, 1999 | From Associated Press
When the Northeastern University Center for Sport in Society released its annual racial report card, the news wasn't so much the grades as who was in the class. Data from the WNBA was examined for the first time this year, making it the first women's league to be scrutinized. The title also changed this year from a "Racial Report Card" to a "Racial and Gender Report Card." "The dimension of diversity has really changed," said the center's director, Richard Lapchick.
SPORTS
July 1, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Michelle Akers where her gold medals are and the answer you'll get might be surprising. "The '91 one is framed with my jersey," she said, "and the gold Olympic one is just sitting in a drawer. When people ask me for it, I get it out, but otherwise that's just past. The memories are there."
SPORTS
June 26, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
Craig Masback, a smart guy who, despite that, campaigned for and accepted the job as executive director of USA Track & Field, attacks corporate America as aggressively as he once did the mile. "We have a greater heritage than any other sport," he says in his sales pitch on behalf of the sport, mentioning the names Jesse Owens, Wilma Rudolph, Bob Mathias, Florence Griffith Joyner, Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Carl Lewis.
SPORTS
June 29, 1990
John McNally, a 1988 Olympian, won the men's standard pistol title Thursday at the 30th U.S. International Shooting Championships in Chino. McNally of Columbus, Ga., had 1146 points, with Terry Anderson of Dallas and Jerry Wilder of Remington, Ind., tied for second at 144. Wilder did not report for the tiebreaking shootoff, so Anderson took second by default. Bob Foth of Colorado Springs, Colo., another 1988 Olympian, won the men's air rifle with a score of 1284.9. Mike Anti of Columbus, Ga.
SPORTS
July 20, 1991 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Mario Treibitch has traveled the world playing, coaching and officiating volleyball matches. He figures volleyball has taken him to 46 countries. This week, he is in Los Angeles as the head official for the Festival's volleyball competition at Loyola Marymount. In two weeks, he will be in Havana as an official at the Pan American Games. Treibitch, 48, from Flushing, N.Y., brought his vast volleyball knowledge to the United States in December of 1974 after leaving the Soviet Union.
SPORTS
December 12, 1998 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Olympic movement, still reeling from organizational chaos in Atlanta and trashed hockey players' apartments in Nagano, suffered another public-relations hit Friday when top officials of the 2002 Salt Lake Organizing Committee were hauled in front of the International Olympic Committee to respond to bribery allegations.
SPORTS
June 10, 1998 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We have heard all the reasons Why Soccer Can't Make It In The United States, pounded into our heads since we were knee-high to a shinguard, and they are lies, every one of them. There's not enough scoring for the average American sports fan. Ask the average American sports fan if he thought Dominik Hasek shutting out Russia, 1-nil, in the men's Olympic hockey gold-medal game was boring.
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