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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1991 | JERRY HICKS
Deputy Dist. Atty. Guy N. Ormes, who has made a career out of prosecuting major fraud cases, will receive an award from the U.S. Department of Justice on Friday honoring him for "outstanding performance as a Special Assistant United States Attorney." Ormes is one of two prosecutors nationwide who will receive the award from Lawrence S. McWhorter, director of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
TERRELL, Texas -- A federal prosecutor has withdrawn from a sweeping racketeering case against a white supremacist gang for "security reasons," a defense attorney told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. Assistant U.S. Atty. Jay Hileman announced his withdrawal from a racketeering case involving the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas on Tuesday in an email to defense lawyers, Houston attorney Richard O. Ely II told The Times. Investigators have scrutinized the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas in recent days after two Kaufman County prosecutors were killed in attacks that followed their office's assistance in a major federal indictment against 34 alleged leaders and members of the gang in November.
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NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
TERRELL, Texas -- A federal prosecutor has withdrawn from a sweeping racketeering case against a white supremacist gang for "security reasons," a defense attorney told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. Assistant U.S. Atty. Jay Hileman announced his withdrawal from a racketeering case involving the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas on Tuesday in an email to defense lawyers, Houston attorney Richard O. Ely II told The Times. Investigators have scrutinized the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas in recent days after two Kaufman County prosecutors were killed in attacks that followed their office's assistance in a major federal indictment against 34 alleged leaders and members of the gang in November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2008 | Scott Glover, Times Staff Writer
Five months after the sudden dismantling of the public corruption unit in the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, questions are still being raised in Washington, D.C., about the controversial move. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has been exchanging letters with a top Justice Department official over the unit's disbanding, and the subject came up during a congressional oversight hearing late last month. In March, Los Angeles U.S. Atty. Thomas P.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like their counterparts in the district attorney's office, federal prosecutors based in Los Angeles can bring criminal charges against police officers accused of using excessive force. But they almost never do. Over the last 10 years, the Public Corruption Unit of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has reviewed scores of allegations that individuals' civil rights were violated through police brutality. Officials, however, can only recall that three cases were prosecuted.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2007 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Congress called a timeout Thursday in its confrontation with the Bush administration after a Senate committee voted to authorize subpoenas to compel White House officials -- including political advisor Karl Rove -- to testify about why eight U.S. attorneys were fired last year.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She entered the courtroom quietly and sat alone in a back row. From her unassuming manner, she could have been a spectator who stood in line and was lucky enough to be admitted to opening arguments at the trial of four followers of Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden, accused of killing 224 people in the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa. If ever appearances were deceiving. Some prosecutors sweep into court surrounded by aides.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
The former Justice Department official who orchestrated the firing of eight U.S. attorneys last year plans to tell Congress today that such dismissals are appropriate when prosecutors prove ineffective from "a political perspective." In his first public remarks on the firings, D. Kyle Sampson says the process of identifying underperforming U.S. attorneys "was not scientific nor was it extensively documented," according to testimony prepared for delivery to the Senate Judiciary Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles has taken the highly unusual step of asking a federal appeals court to erase or at least soften a stingingly critical decision that accuses a prosecutor of a major ethical violation in a drug case. U.S. Atty. Terree A. Bowers made the unusual request in a brief he recently filed in response to an Aug. 4 U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2008 | Scott Glover, Times Staff Writer
Five months after the sudden dismantling of the public corruption unit in the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, questions are still being raised in Washington, D.C., about the controversial move. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has been exchanging letters with a top Justice Department official over the unit's disbanding, and the subject came up during a congressional oversight hearing late last month. In March, Los Angeles U.S. Atty. Thomas P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Lawyers for former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona said Thursday that dozens of federal prosecutors have disqualified themselves from prosecuting his corruption case -- and the defense wants to know why. Carona's lawyers disclosed in federal court in Santa Ana that federal prosecutors in Los Angeles and Orange counties have declared an unspecified conflict of interest and said they could not be involved in Carona's prosecution.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Bogden had just settled back into his office in Las Vegas early last December after a trip to Washington where he and dozens of other U.S. attorneys attended a conference at the Justice Department on protecting children from crime. It had been an upbeat occasion. The department's No. 2 official gave a rousing speech during a closed-door session in which he praised members of the group as among the finest and most able U.S. attorneys in the department's storied history.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The controversy surrounding Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales widened last week after FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III gave testimony on Capitol Hill about an administration anti-terrorism program, testimony that seemed to contradict sworn statements made earlier by the attorney general. Now Democrats are alleging that Gonzales lied to Congress and are even calling for the appointment of a special prosecutor by the Justice Department.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The House Judiciary Committee said Monday that it would move forward with contempt-of-Congress proceedings against President Bush's chief of staff, Joshua Bolten, and former White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers for refusing to comply with congressional subpoenas pertaining to the probe of the firing of eight U.S. attorneys last year. Chairman John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Former White House Counsel Harriet E. Miers will continue to refuse to appear before a House committee, her lawyer said Tuesday, despite Democrats' threats to hold her in contempt. "Ms. Miers will not appear before the committee or otherwise produce documents or provide testimony," lawyer George T. Manning said in a letter to the committee. The House Judiciary Committee had given Miers, who defied a subpoena to appear before the committee, until Tuesday to change her mind about testifying.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's decision to defy congressional demands for documents and testimony in the U.S. attorneys case leaves Democrats with a difficult choice of lowering their sights in the investigation or facing a long and uncertain court fight. The White House told congressional leaders Monday that Bush was asserting executive privilege in refusing them access to senior officials and documents about the firing of eight U.S. attorneys last year.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2003 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
James W. Treffinger was the political boss of Essex County and one of New Jersey's most powerful Republicans. When rumors circulated that he might be the target of a federal corruption probe, he scoffed, boasting to an associate that the rookie U.S. attorney wouldn't know a law book from a cookbook. Treffinger could not believe that a newcomer like Christopher J.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Excerpts from the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing where Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales testified: "The truth is that these firings haven't been explained, and there is mounting evidence of improper considerations and actions resulting in the dismissals. The dismissed U.S. attorneys have testified under oath they believe political influence resulted in their being replaced. If they're right, the mixing of partisan political goals into ... law enforcement is highly improper." Sen.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Senate Judiciary Committee chairman said Sunday that he was ready to go to court if the White House resisted congressional subpoenas for information on the firing of eight federal prosecutors. "If they don't cooperate, yes, I'd go that far," Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.) said on NBC's "Meet the Press." He had been asked whether he would seek a congressional vote on contempt citations if President Bush did not comply. That move would push the matter to court.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Deputy Atty. Gen. Paul McNulty portrayed himself as largely out of the loop in the Justice Department's firings of eight U.S. attorneys and said he initially questioned whether they were appropriate. Testifying before a House panel investigating the dismissals, McNulty said he was cut out of some of the department's most important personnel decisions. In May, Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales said he relied on McNulty more than any other advisor to decide which U.S. attorneys should be fired.
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