Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Border Mexico
IN THE NEWS

United States Border Mexico

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Phoenix acquitted a former Border Patrol agent Thursday in the slaying of an unarmed drug-smuggling suspect who was shot in the back as he fled through a canyon toward the U.S.-Mexico border. Prosecutors had charged Michael Andrew Elmer, 30, with civil rights violations and obstruction of justice in the 1992 shooting of Dario Miranda Valenzuela, a 26-year-old Mexican national.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | Associated Press
Mexican big rigs won't have to undergo a U.S. safety check for up to 18 months after they have full access to U.S. roads under proposed new federal rules. Critics pounced on that aspect of the plan, saying the trucks should be thoroughly inspected before being allowed to operate in the United States to ensure that U.S. motorists aren't sharing the road with unsafe vehicles.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 2, 2001 | Associated Press
Mexican big rigs won't have to undergo a U.S. safety check for up to 18 months after they have full access to U.S. roads under proposed new federal rules. Critics pounced on that aspect of the plan, saying the trucks should be thoroughly inspected before being allowed to operate in the United States to ensure that U.S. motorists aren't sharing the road with unsafe vehicles.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customs officials on Wednesday announced the seizure of what they called the largest single load of marijuana ever found at a U.S.-Mexico border crossing: 15,185 pounds of the drug hidden in a truckload of new television sets. A federal contraband enforcement team at the Otay Mesa border crossing was alerted by a drug-sniffing dog to the 1978 tractor and its 53-foot trailer Tuesday during a routineinspection, said Vince Bond, a spokesman for the Customs Service.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disturbed by deaths among Mexican migrants crossing illegally into southern Arizona, church leaders and self-styled good Samaritans have begun offering a range of aid to immigrants--at times breaking the law to carry out what they see as acts of mercy.
NEWS
April 5, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customs officials on Wednesday announced the seizure of what they called the largest single load of marijuana ever found at a U.S.-Mexico border crossing: 15,185 pounds of the drug hidden in a truckload of new television sets. A federal contraband enforcement team at the Otay Mesa border crossing was alerted by a drug-sniffing dog to the 1978 tractor and its 53-foot trailer Tuesday during a routineinspection, said Vince Bond, a spokesman for the Customs Service.
BOOKS
March 15, 1987 | Frank del Olmo, Del Olmo is a Times editorial writer, specializing in Latin American affairs.
The publishers of "La Frontera" apparently could not decide if they wanted the book to be a serious and thorough study of the U.S.-Mexico border, or a coffeetable book about the often picturesque borderlands and colorful North Americans and Mexicans who live there. That is unfortunate, because in either case, the book would have been a useful contribution to the growing body of literature about the nation's southern border. Instead, it falls short on both counts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992
Even as immigration authorities aim to get a better handle on their own efforts to control illegal immigration, they have found themselves under increasing scrutiny as they try to do a tough job. Congressional oversight hearings have been held on charges of excessive force by the Border Patrol and on the agency's pursuit policy. This week a lawsuit brought by a man whose pregnant wife was killed during a chase went to trial in federal court in Santa Ana.
BOOKS
April 19, 1987
I am grateful for several kind things Frank del Olmo says about my book, "La Frontera: The United States Border With Mexico" (The Book Review, March 15). But I must object to allegations of occasional careless research. Del Olmo suggests that my investigation of drug trafficker Pablo Acosta (whom he concluded I admire, which I and others find amazing) began and ended with Acosta himself. In fact, I queried the Drug Enforcement Agency and the U.S. Customs Service about him--the latter was fascinated that I had interviewed and arranged to photograph him, something they had failed for years to achieve.
NEWS
May 30, 1997 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Since leaving home," writes Howard Frank Mosher, a combination of Ernest Hemingway, Henry David Thoreau and Jim Harrison from Vermont's Northeast Kingdom, "I've been on the lookout for indicators of what I think of as true North Country. Good brook trout fishing is one such indicator. So is a notoriously severe climate. Yet another is static over the car radio. Whenever I can't pick up anything but static, I know I'm really up on the hinterlands, exactly where I want to be."
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disturbed by deaths among Mexican migrants crossing illegally into southern Arizona, church leaders and self-styled good Samaritans have begun offering a range of aid to immigrants--at times breaking the law to carry out what they see as acts of mercy.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury in Phoenix acquitted a former Border Patrol agent Thursday in the slaying of an unarmed drug-smuggling suspect who was shot in the back as he fled through a canyon toward the U.S.-Mexico border. Prosecutors had charged Michael Andrew Elmer, 30, with civil rights violations and obstruction of justice in the 1992 shooting of Dario Miranda Valenzuela, a 26-year-old Mexican national.
BOOKS
March 15, 1987 | Frank del Olmo, Del Olmo is a Times editorial writer, specializing in Latin American affairs.
The publishers of "La Frontera" apparently could not decide if they wanted the book to be a serious and thorough study of the U.S.-Mexico border, or a coffeetable book about the often picturesque borderlands and colorful North Americans and Mexicans who live there. That is unfortunate, because in either case, the book would have been a useful contribution to the growing body of literature about the nation's southern border. Instead, it falls short on both counts.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new eight-foot-high, seven-mile fence looks like any other freeway median barrier. But this fence, installed near the U.S. Border Patrol's San Onofre checkpoint, is meant to control people, not vehicles. This bloody stretch of Interstate 5 south of San Clemente is a focal point in the war to protect the United States' border with Mexico.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Depending on where it's parked, a mutant bicycle with two seats and two opposing sets of handlebars could mean many things. Starting Saturday, one will be on display inside the Centro Cultural Tijuana, as part of inSITE97, a binational exhibition of art in public places.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|