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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The House, seized by election-year enthusiasm for anti-drug legislation, voted overwhelmingly Thursday to require the armed forces to halt illegal drug trafficking into the United States. The measure, authored by Rep. Duncan L. Hunter (R-Coronado), gives President Reagan only 45 days "to substantially halt the unlawful penetration of the United States borders by aircraft and vessels carrying narcotics."
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OPINION
August 18, 2002 | DINA KHAYAT, Dina Khayat is managing director of Lazard Asset Management Egypt and is a graduate of Columbia University Business School.
It was the fall of 1991 and I had just been accepted into a top-tier business school in the United States. I arrived in New York from my native Egypt, my 5-foot frame almost completely hidden by two huge suitcases containing, among other things, silverware for the dinner parties my mother assured me I would want to give. I had signed up for a studio apartment facilitated by the university.
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NEWS
March 12, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's new nominee for defense secretary, Rep. Dick Cheney (R-Wyo.), has in the past supported a plan strongly opposed by the Pentagon that would require the U.S. military to halt drug smuggling over the nation's southern border. Cheney's vote for the proposal, which was approved by the House last May 5 over the opposition of then-Defense Secretary Frank C.
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Alarmed by growing hints of Al Qaeda's progress toward obtaining a nuclear or radiological weapon, the Bush administration has deployed hundreds of sophisticated sensors since November to U.S. borders, overseas facilities and choke points around Washington. Officials have placed the Delta Force, the nation's elite commando unit, on a new standby alert to seize control of nuclear materials that the sensors may detect.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House passed a $270-billion defense bill that includes authorizing the military to help patrol U.S. borders in the war against drug smuggling and illegal immigration. Opponents said the plan--an amendment approved, 288 to 132--could turn the U.S.-Mexican border into an armed corridor. The overall bill, covering military programs and spending for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, was then passed on a 357-60 vote. The Senate is expected to vote on its version next month.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Border Patrol has long been regarded as the blue-collar underdog of law enforcement. Agents drive battered vehicles. Radios fail during pursuits. Lack of personnel in San Diego forces agents into tedious tasks such as interviewing lines of prisoners being returned to Tijuana--often the same faces night after night. In an effort to end the frustration and anarchy at the border, the immigration control initiative announced by Atty. Gen.
NEWS
May 11, 1988
The military should not become deeply involved in fighting illegal drugs because soldiers are not properly trained to enforce civilian laws, Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci told Congress. "I think it is unwise to get the military into the law enforcement question," Carlucci said at a hearing of the Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1987 | United Press International
The Customs Service intercepted 87,898 pounds of cocaine at U.S. borders during fiscal 1987, which ended Sept. 30, the Treasury Department reported Tuesday. It noted that the figure represented a record, up from 54,389 pounds of the drug seized in fical 1986.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | From Associated Press
President Reagan on Wednesday extended the territorial waters of the United States to 12 miles from 3 miles to conform to the standard set by a U.N. agreement in 1982. The presidential proclamation said the extension will give the United States, for an additional 9 miles offshore, "a sovereignty and jurisdiction that extend to the airspace over the territorial sea, as well as to its bed and subsoil."
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pedro Vanegas Lopez, a 33-year-old Honduran refugee fleeing the devastation of Hurricane Mitch, knew his journey to the United States would be a perilous one. He expected to confront thieves along the way, to haggle over bribes with Mexican policemen, to walk for many days and to sleep under the stars. It was what he encountered as he crossed the Mexican-Guatemalan border that caught him completely by surprise.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The House passed a $270-billion defense bill that includes authorizing the military to help patrol U.S. borders in the war against drug smuggling and illegal immigration. Opponents said the plan--an amendment approved, 288 to 132--could turn the U.S.-Mexican border into an armed corridor. The overall bill, covering military programs and spending for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1, was then passed on a 357-60 vote. The Senate is expected to vote on its version next month.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Doris Meissner on Friday announced the second phase of the Clinton Administration's much-heralded Operation Gatekeeper to thwart illegal immigration and score political points in a state where illegal immigration is a major issue. Amid the roar of traffic at the San Ysidro border crossing, Meissner announced that 45 more agents and 25 more inspectors will be assigned along the border.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As opposing camps in the national immigration debate exchange rhetorical grenades, a federal commission is quietly fashioning a set of recommendations that could provide the basis for bipartisan agreement on some of the issue's most contentious elements. The report being compiled by the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform is expected to have a significant impact on how immigration policy is formed during the next two years, Administration sources said. The report is due in September.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Border Patrol has long been regarded as the blue-collar underdog of law enforcement. Agents drive battered vehicles. Radios fail during pursuits. Lack of personnel in San Diego forces agents into tedious tasks such as interviewing lines of prisoners being returned to Tijuana--often the same faces night after night. In an effort to end the frustration and anarchy at the border, the immigration control initiative announced by Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Colombian drug dealers are using a mixture of cocaine and polystyrene plastic in products that can be shipped into this country undetected, federal officials and Florida authorities said. The technology makes it possible to transform the cocaine into many products and in a form undetectable by drug-sniffing dogs or routine visual or chemical tests, the law enforcement officials said in Miami.
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Alarmed by growing hints of Al Qaeda's progress toward obtaining a nuclear or radiological weapon, the Bush administration has deployed hundreds of sophisticated sensors since November to U.S. borders, overseas facilities and choke points around Washington. Officials have placed the Delta Force, the nation's elite commando unit, on a new standby alert to seize control of nuclear materials that the sensors may detect.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In a marked shift in the nation's anti-drug strategy, a plan nearing approval by the Bush Administration would direct hundreds of millions of dollars to cocaine-producing nations and crack-blighted inner cities while providing no new assistance for border interception programs, officials said Wednesday. The sweeping plan--drafted by William J.
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