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United States Borders Mexico

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NEWS
May 19, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The discovery of an elaborate 270-foot tunnel built under the Mexican border by drug traffickers to haul large quantities of cocaine to an Arizona warehouse was revealed Friday by federal officials. Flabbergasted Customs Service agents described the million-dollar passageway as "something out of a James Bond movie," replete with electric lighting, concrete reinforcement and a hydraulic system that raised a game-room floor in a Mexico hide-out to provide entry to the secret border crossing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2002 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, untreated waste has poured from a sieve-like system in Tijuana and flowed downhill through the Tijuana River into the United States, where it eventually dumps into the Pacific Ocean. Officials from the U.S. and Mexico are preparing for talks this month that many hope will solve the problem, which has beset generations of residents along the border.
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NEWS
July 24, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
While growing up in Bakersfield, Marco E. Lopez regularly delivered produce from his parents' food-supply business to nearby camps populated by migrant laborers. Their deplorable living conditions were striking to the Mexican-American youth, who was himself accustomed to a more middle-class life style. "I had never done farm work," Lopez recalled last week, "so those conditions made an impression."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By one measure, at least, life on the border is back to normal: The drugs are flowing again. Narcotics seizures by U.S. authorities along California's border with Mexico plummeted during the weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks, but have bounced back to levels of a year earlier and even gone much higher.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to talking about Mexico and its economy, few can match an Orange County financial consultant with the decidedly Anglo name of Samuel Copeland Palmer IV. He knows the number of Mexicans who read comic books each week (85 million), as well as the availability of telephones (three for every 100 people).
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the U.S. Border Patrol is a rogue agency as its detractors insist, the most renegade branch is based here along the northern expanses of the Sonoran desert. Within the last six months, an agent and a former agent were convicted in separate cases of smuggling drugs while on duty. Another agent was tried on charges of murder and assault, and a veteran investigator was locked up for perjury.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a practiced eye, Arturo, a Tijuana taxi driver in an open-necked, baby-blue silk shirt, sizes up the tourists trudging off the footbridge from the United States. "Taxi, lady? You want pharmacy? I get you good pharmacy," he urges, stepping from a line of beckoning taxi drivers in big belts and straw cowboy hats. "Good prices! No prescriptions!" Soon he is nosing his long yellow Oldsmobile through scruffy streets choked with pharmacies.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | Associated Press
A new federal program designed to crack down on drug smugglers includes a proposal to send Customs Service helicopters across the border to ferry Mexican police as they battle drug traffickers. The program, Operation Hard Line, also calls for the addition of 40 to 80 Customs special agents on the Mexican border as well as computers, X-ray machines and video cameras to assist inspectors and agents, according to a Customs Service outline obtained by the Associated Press.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | Reuters
U.S. and Mexican authorities Friday announced the seizure of $4 million in property and the freezing of more than $10 million in Mexican bank accounts as part of a joint effort to break up a large cross-border drug conspiracy. U.S. Atty. Alan Bersin said four people were indicted on suspicion of organizing the drug smuggling operation between Mexicali, Mexico, and Calexico, Calif., and of laundering proceeds by buying property in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1995 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attacking a vast cocaine trafficking network that was allegedly camouflaged by U.S. and Mexican import-export companies, federal prosecutors charged the owners of a prominent Mexican foods business Thursday with conspiring to use a cross-border tunnel to smuggle drugs into California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He wears Hush Puppies and a somber expression that leans toward worry. His voice, gentle and drab, seems an unlikely conveyance for a message of moral indignation. Yet Roberto Martinez has stubbornly delivered such a message during nearly three decades of advocacy on behalf of migrants at the U.S.-Mexican border. And on the verge of retirement, here was Martinez again, presiding at another news conference to denounce alleged excesses by the U.S. Border Patrol two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional representatives along the U.S.-Mexico border urged the White House on Friday to declare an emergency for U.S. border communities whose commerce has plunged since Sept. 11 because fewer Mexican shoppers are crossing. Stepped-up searches for car bombs and increased scrutiny of immigration documents at the nation's entrances have lengthened waiting times, discouraging many customers from coming north to spend money in communities long dependent on a cross-border clientele.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than a decade, employment and output at the foreign-owned factories along the U.S.-Mexico border are in decline. This has prompted concerns that investment in Mexico's manufacturing sector could slow, rippling across the broader economy. After 12 years of steady growth, the output at these factories, known as maquiladoras, could slide by 3% for all of 2001, said Rolando Gonzalez Barron, president of Mexico's maquiladora trade association.
NEWS
October 3, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attacks on the United States and the security precautions that followed depressed the traffic in people, vehicles, cash and drugs that crossed the U.S.-Mexico border last month, according to new statistics and anecdotal evidence. The number of illegal migrants apprehended last month trying to enter the U.S. from Mexico fell 40% compared with September 2000, the Immigration and Naturalization Service reported Tuesday, a good indication that illegal immigration declined sharply overall.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years of boom times, the twin-city border crossing known as the two Laredos had already begun hurting from this year's economic slowdown. Then came the Sept. 11 terror attacks, and suddenly this city and Laredo on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande are reeling. Truck traffic has flattened after a decade of double-digit growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A congressional report says the U.S. government's 7-year-old crackdown along the Southwest border has served mainly to steer undocumented migrants to dangerous mountains, deserts and rivers but has produced no persuasive evidence that illegal entries have fallen along the 2,000-mile boundary. The assessment is included in an annual evaluation of U.S. border strategy by the General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1998 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A burglary suspect, holding his young son hostage, led Los Angeles police on a 150-mile high-speed pursuit Monday that ended in a dramatic standoff at the Mexican border, where the suspect dropped the child and sprinted across the international frontier into the waiting arms of Mexican authorities.
NEWS
March 20, 1993 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the largest cocaine seizure ever made along the U.S.-Mexico border--almost four tons, or 7,702 pounds, of the powdery drug found hidden inside a Hidro Gas de Juarez propane tanker Oct. 3, 1990. But the record haul at the Otay port of entry was quickly engulfed in controversy as embarrassed U.S. Customs officials tried to explain how the driver was released before inspectors managed to extract the drugs hours later from a hidden compartment inside the tanker. As was routine, the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2001 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born of the controversy over free trade, it was an unusual bilateral creation: a public bank, run jointly by the United States and Mexico, to finance desperately needed antipollution measures along the shared border. But the North American Development Bank has spent the last six years in obscurity, largely ignored by the governments that spawned it and unable to lend impoverished border towns more than a pittance from its bulging vault.
NEWS
June 23, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH and KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican and American officials unveiled a sweeping program Friday to improve safety for people crossing illegally into the United States, taking the first concrete step toward an overall accord ensuring orderly and safe migration. The border safety pact, announced in Mexico City and Washington, calls for a U.S. review of the controversial tight-border policy that has steered Mexicans into dangerous and remote crossings.
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