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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988 | BOB JAMES, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles area residents intending to go to the post office today may be in for a surprise as postal officials, seeking to cut $160 million from this year's operating budget, have closed down 21 offices on Saturdays and shortened weekday hours at more than 110 others. Mail delivery will still continue on Saturdays. However, there will no longer be Sunday pickup or processing, adding a one-day delay to mail delivery during the week.
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NEWS
April 26, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Individual income tax receipts are running far below expectations this year, threatening to punch a $50-billion-plus hole in the current federal budget and undercut efforts to pay for the 10-year, $1.35-trillion tax cut. Daily Treasury Department reports show that receipts through Wednesday, the latest date available, were $102.2 billion lower than at the same time last fiscal year, with less than half the difference traceable to the tax cut.
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NEWS
January 26, 2000 | ART PINE and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton said Tuesday that the budget he will send Congress on Feb. 7 will propose paying off the entire $3.6-trillion national debt by 2013--two years earlier than had been expected even a few months ago. At a news conference, the president attributed the opportunity for a speedup to an economy that is even stronger than had been forecast, resulting in higher tax revenue and lower expenses, and to his own austere budget policies.
NEWS
April 8, 2002 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cost of bolstering airport security is mounting rapidly, and this year alone could run more than triple what has been budgeted, congressional and aviation industry officials say. The unexpectedly steep costs facing the new Transportation Security Administration, created after Sept. 11, stem from greater manpower needs, more expensive bomb detection equipment at airports and other factors. They have prompted the Bush administration to ask Congress for an additional $4.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Senate Democrats dealt a severe blow to the Republican legislative agenda Thursday, killing the heart of the GOP's campaign platform--a constitutional amendment that mandates a balanced budget in seven years. Conceding a significant loss of momentum, grim-faced Republicans immediately set out to exact political revenge, blaming President Clinton and targeting six Democrats who voted against the proposal even though they had backed a virtually identical measure only a year and a day earlier.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Bernard L. Schwartz, chairman and chief executive of New York-based Loral Corp., doesn't make any apologies for the fact that his $3.2 million in compensation made him the defense industry's highest-paid executive last year. Asked recently about his compensation, Schwartz said: "We're in a competitive market and we pay well for good performance. I'm reminded of a remark made by Babe Ruth when he was asked why he made more money than the President. He said, 'Well, I had a better year.'
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By 2 p.m. Tuesday, security officer Nick McGahuey felt like he had been summoned to keep the peace in a ghost town. The Chet Holifield Federal Building on Avila Road here, known to locals as the Ziggurat building, was eerily deserted. Looking for tax advice at the Internal Revenue Service? "Outta luck," as McGahuey put it. "The doors are locked up tighter than a drum." Those hoping for help in obtaining Social Security checks would find three employees out of 21 on duty at a solitary window.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expressing frustration over the federal government shutdown and the strain on furloughed workers, about 100 government employees Tuesday staged a "work-in" at a Baltimore Social Security Administration office. Chanting slogans--"Congress, we want to work!"--the American Federation of Government Employees Local 1923 reversed the normal bargaining practice of withholding labor by urging its members to report to their jobs.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | DOYLE McMANUS and WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the first half of 2001, President Bush made tax cuts the focus of the nation's political debate--and won most of what he asked for. Now, in the second half, Democrats think they've found an issue that can stop Bush in his tracks: the shrinking federal budget surplus that those tax cuts helped produce.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the nation faces a crisis that could undermine future living standards, President Clinton flatly told an audience of business leaders Thursday that the economic package he plans to offer next week will raise taxes for both individuals and corporations. Clinton has walked around the subject of tax increases rhetorically for weeks.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush rallied U.S. troops here Friday and then viewed a deafening, action-packed tactical demonstration by Special Forces at nearby Ft. Bragg, home to units deployed in Afghanistan and elsewhere in Central Asia. Bush used his visit--the latest of several he has made to military bases since the war on terrorism began--to urge support for his defense spending request.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite improvements in the economy and pressure from conservatives to balance the federal budget, House Republicans late Wednesday endorsed a $2.1-trillion spending blueprint that would produce a $46-billion deficit in 2003. The budget, which would fully fund large spending increases sought by President Bush for defense and homeland security, demonstrates how hard it will be for Congress to avoid deficits during a time of war--and in an election year.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
The war in Afghanistan and the Pentagon's efforts to bolster security at home will cost a projected $30 billion this year, far more than Congress has provided, according to Defense Department documents obtained by Associated Press. President Bush and Congress have given the Pentagon $17.4 billion for the war and the domestic fight against terrorism this fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. Other federal agencies have received billions more.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Americans express resounding approval of President Bush's performance at home and abroad, an overwhelming majority would rather cancel later stages of his signature tax cut than tap Social Security revenue to pay for other government programs, a Los Angeles Times Poll has found. With war, the recession and the tax cut's cost straining the government's bottom line, the White House on Monday released a budget that projects Washington will need to divert $1.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let the spending spree begin. Congress received President Bush's budget Monday in a political and fiscal climate that has precious few incentives for lawmakers to exercise fiscal discipline. It is an election year. War and recession have loosened purse strings. And even Bush is saying other matters now are more important than keeping the government in the black. That's a big departure from the trend of the last two decades.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | GREG MILLER and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House on Monday unveiled a mammoth $379-billion budget for the Pentagon that is expected to provide a bounty of expanded resources for intelligence agencies but otherwise relatively little new funding for the war on terrorism. The budget calls for a $48-billion overall increase in defense spending, a 14% jump that represents the largest percentage increase since the United States escalated its involvement in the Vietnam War in 1966. Defense Secretary Donald H.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990
In the heyday of the Vietnam War, Tony Tropin began working at Hughes Aircraft as an optical systems engineer. When the war ended and the aerospace industry suffered a collapse, Tropin managed to hold on to his Hughes job. But after surviving the ups and downs of the defense industry for 20 years, Tropin's luck finally expired last year. He was involuntarily retired from Hughes, one of 3,200 workers who were put out in 1989. An additional 6,100 Hughes workers left on their own.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today, as the spacecraft Galileo swoops past Jupiter's volcano-ridden moon Io collecting images and scientific data, few will be as mesmerized by the close encounter as La Verne resident Eileen Clark. The 49-year-old space buff is a mission operations analyst at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. She trouble-shoots the Galileo project, anticipating problems before they occur. Clark loves her job. In fact, she'd be thrilled to remain at JPL for years to come.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush submitted a $2.1-trillion budget Monday that sets aside debt reduction and squeezes domestic programs to finance homeland security, the war on terrorism and another round of big tax cuts. Reflecting Reaganesque fiscal priorities, Bush's budget for fiscal year 2003 asks Congress for new tax cuts worth $590 billion and defense spending increases totaling $550 billion over the next 10 years.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the budget he delivered Monday, President Bush relies on one source of new money more than any other to pay for his proposals: the trillions of dollars in Social Security funds being set aside for the start of the baby boom retirement.
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