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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988 | BOB JAMES, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles area residents intending to go to the post office today may be in for a surprise as postal officials, seeking to cut $160 million from this year's operating budget, have closed down 21 offices on Saturdays and shortened weekday hours at more than 110 others. Mail delivery will still continue on Saturdays. However, there will no longer be Sunday pickup or processing, adding a one-day delay to mail delivery during the week.
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NEWS
February 3, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Big tax cuts. Big increases in defense spending. And the return of federal budget deficits that squeeze the rest of government. Suddenly the battle over the budget that President Bush will release Monday is beginning to look a lot like the 1980s.
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NEWS
January 26, 2000 | ART PINE and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton said Tuesday that the budget he will send Congress on Feb. 7 will propose paying off the entire $3.6-trillion national debt by 2013--two years earlier than had been expected even a few months ago. At a news conference, the president attributed the opportunity for a speedup to an economy that is even stronger than had been forecast, resulting in higher tax revenue and lower expenses, and to his own austere budget policies.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration will ask Congress on Monday to overhaul the nation's system of unemployment insurance, gradually shifting financial responsibility from the federal government to the states for the Depression-era program that remains a bedrock protection for middle-class workers. The proposal is part of President Bush's 2003 budget, which calls for sharp cuts in the federal unemployment tax.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Bernard L. Schwartz, chairman and chief executive of New York-based Loral Corp., doesn't make any apologies for the fact that his $3.2 million in compensation made him the defense industry's highest-paid executive last year. Asked recently about his compensation, Schwartz said: "We're in a competitive market and we pay well for good performance. I'm reminded of a remark made by Babe Ruth when he was asked why he made more money than the President. He said, 'Well, I had a better year.'
NEWS
November 15, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
By 2 p.m. Tuesday, security officer Nick McGahuey felt like he had been summoned to keep the peace in a ghost town. The Chet Holifield Federal Building on Avila Road here, known to locals as the Ziggurat building, was eerily deserted. Looking for tax advice at the Internal Revenue Service? "Outta luck," as McGahuey put it. "The doors are locked up tighter than a drum." Those hoping for help in obtaining Social Security checks would find three employees out of 21 on duty at a solitary window.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expressing frustration over the federal government shutdown and the strain on furloughed workers, about 100 government employees Tuesday staged a "work-in" at a Baltimore Social Security Administration office. Chanting slogans--"Congress, we want to work!"--the American Federation of Government Employees Local 1923 reversed the normal bargaining practice of withholding labor by urging its members to report to their jobs.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the nation faces a crisis that could undermine future living standards, President Clinton flatly told an audience of business leaders Thursday that the economic package he plans to offer next week will raise taxes for both individuals and corporations. Clinton has walked around the subject of tax increases rhetorically for weeks.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990
In the heyday of the Vietnam War, Tony Tropin began working at Hughes Aircraft as an optical systems engineer. When the war ended and the aerospace industry suffered a collapse, Tropin managed to hold on to his Hughes job. But after surviving the ups and downs of the defense industry for 20 years, Tropin's luck finally expired last year. He was involuntarily retired from Hughes, one of 3,200 workers who were put out in 1989. An additional 6,100 Hughes workers left on their own.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1999 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today, as the spacecraft Galileo swoops past Jupiter's volcano-ridden moon Io collecting images and scientific data, few will be as mesmerized by the close encounter as La Verne resident Eileen Clark. The 49-year-old space buff is a mission operations analyst at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. She trouble-shoots the Galileo project, anticipating problems before they occur. Clark loves her job. In fact, she'd be thrilled to remain at JPL for years to come.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To make up an estimated $1.3-billion shortage for a popular college tuition grant program, the Bush administration is proposing to cut funding for hundreds of local education and community projects that lawmakers singled out for federal aid late last year.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | EDWIN CHEN and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush said Wednesday that he will ask Congress for a $48-billion defense budget increase next year to help pay for the war on terrorism, futuristic weapon systems and a military pay raise. "We will invest in more precision weapons, in missile defenses, in unmanned vehicles, in high-tech equipment for soldiers on the ground," the president said in a speech to military reserve officers.
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The post-Sept. 11 truce is over for President Bush's signature domestic achievement: the sweeping tax cut he pushed into law last spring. After weeks of deferential restraint, leading congressional Democrats have renewed efforts to blame the $1.35-trillion tax cut for the slow economy and the disappearing federal budget surplus--an opening salvo in what party strategists say will be a sustained political offensive through the 2002 election.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2001 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration is trying to staunch the flood of tax-cut and spending plans in response to the September terror attacks, fearful that they could overwhelm the budget, damage the economy and saddle President Bush with a big-government legacy. The latest effort came Tuesday when administration budget director Mitchell E.
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to avert a severe recession after last month's terrorist attacks, Congress is about to make decisions that could shape the nation's budget and economy long after the bombs stop dropping on Kabul. The tax cuts and spending increases being considered in Congress will almost certainly plunge the government back into deficit spending for the first time in five years.
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | GREG MILLER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration warned House GOP leaders Friday that tumbling revenues might force the government to spend up to $15 billion of the Social Security surplus this year, congressional sources said, signaling that the budget outlook has worsened far more swiftly than the White House has previously acknowledged. The disclosure by White House Budget Director Mitchell E. Daniels Jr. prompted a scramble among Republican lawmakers to find a way to avoid taking that politically hazardous step.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton, stung by Republican criticism and scrambling to carve out a role in Congress' budget deliberations, unveiled a spending plan Tuesday night that embraces the Republican goal of a balanced budget but achieves it three years further into the future. In a hastily planned five-minute address to the nation, Clinton outlined a plan to cut growth in projected spending by $1.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1992 | KEVIN E. CULLINANE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tim Hanson had heard that the luxury tax placed on expensive boats could be lifted, but as he helped set up for the Southern California Boat Show at the Convention Center, the news was just sinking in. "Yee-haw!" crowed Hanson, service manager for Marine Center Inc., a Pomona power boat dealership. "The taxes on boats are discouraging a lot of people from buying them. If they drop the tax, I bet things will change."
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Senate committee Friday approved a spending bill that calls for a new round of military base closings and would pare more than one-third of the new money that President Bush wants for his missile defense program next year. On a party-line 13-12 vote, the Democratic-led Senate Armed Services Committee approved all $343 billion that Bush sought for the military in the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1. But it removed $1.3 billion of the $8.
NEWS
August 23, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The projected federal budget surplus has shriveled since April, the White House said Wednesday, setting the stage for a bitter partisan struggle over proposals to provide prescription drug coverage under Medicare and boost spending on defense and education. The combined effect of tax cuts, spending increases and a slumping U.S. economy have reduced this year's estimated surplus to $158 billion, down from $281 billion projected by White House budget officials only four months ago.
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