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December 13, 1988 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
In the category of social notes from all over, mark your calendars for an event that even former New York Parks Commissioner Tom Hoving, creator of some of the wildest '60s "Happenings" in Central Park, could not have thought up: The Statue of Liberty of New York and the statue of Christopher Columbus of Barcelona are going to get married. They've set the date, early 1992, to coincide with the 500th anniversary later that year, on Oct. 12, of you know what.
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NEWS
January 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Andrew Young celebrated Martin Luther King Day on Monday by urging Americans to put the divisiveness of the election behind them and accept George W. Bush as their president. He also urged Bush to avoid his party's "polarizing instincts."
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NEWS
January 21, 1992 | ANN ROVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Martin Luther King Day observances turned violent Monday when police, clad in riot gear, clashed with thousands of demonstrators protesting a Ku Klux Klan rally on the state capitol steps. Three police officers were injured by rocks and bottles and at least five protesters were treated at Denver General Hospital, said police spokesman Det. Dave Metzler. Police said they arrested 21 people, including six juveniles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five decades have passed, but retired U.S. Army Sgt. Thomas J. McGowan can recount that hellish day in 1945 as if it were exploding before his eyes. On Jan. 17, the platoon leader stood his ground as hundreds of German troops advanced on the town of Oberwampach in Luxembourg, about 175 miles from Paris. After ordering his men to retreat, McGowan, a member of the Army's 90th Infantry Division, called in artillery to stop the panzer tanks and the SS soldiers.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | JASON B. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Asparagus Month, National Dairy Goat Awareness Week and National Prune Day are typical national commemoratives--days, weeks, months or even years that are recognized by the government to honor various people, events and causes. And all, in the eyes of some lawmakers, are superfluous, expensive and ripe for reform. "If we spent as much time on serious efforts to balance the budget, reform the nation's health-care system or target U.S.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When he crosses into California on the last leg of a grueling, eight-city U.S. tour, anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela will become the star attraction at mass rallies inside sports coliseums, at elegant fund-raisers and on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | LEO W. BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John McElroy is a silver-haired scholar who has spent countless hours of the past two years in the grip of a thoroughly improbable idea. It came to him one day out of nowhere and won't let him be. It involves stately redwood trees, visions of world harmony and Christopher Columbus. When the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America was still a few years away, McElroy, an English professor at the University of Arizona, began wondering how it would be celebrated.
NEWS
May 23, 1987 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
When the city fathers of tiny Madison, Minn., decided to celebrate the bicentennial of the Constitution and the preeminent role played by their namesake, Founding Father James Madison of Virginia, they immediately thought of Lou T. Fisk.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In joyful, dignified ceremonies, the "golden door" through which 12 million immigrants entered the United States was reopened at Ellis Island on Sunday. Trumpets sounded, a military band played and 49 new Americans were sworn in. Guests sipped Champagne and Vice President Dan Quayle cut the white ribbon to open the restored Great Hall as an immigration museum.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS and DARA McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five former American hostages--heralded as "brave and wonderful men"--stood beside President and Mrs. Bush on Thursday as Bush illuminated the national Christmas tree and officially ushered in the holiday season. "On behalf of our loving country I say to them . . . , welcome home," Bush said before a large crowd that had gathered on the Ellipse, the broad expanse of lawn behind the White House, for the annual lighting ceremony.
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | From Times wire services
Decrying the Confederate flag as a symbol of slavery and racism, about 46,000 people marched to South Carolina's Statehouse on Martin Luther King Day to demand that the banner be taken down. They also said the slain civil rights leader should be honored with a permanent state holiday. South Carolina state workers now can take off the King holiday or another of their choice, including several tied to Confederate anniversaries.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if they gave a New Year's Eve party and the whole town came? Basically, that's what has happened here since 1976, when the country's first "First Night" celebration was staged. The tradition took hold, so much so that this city of about 600,000 residents expects 2 million people to show up for First Night 1999.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | Associated Press
First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton on Thursday unveiled a red-white-and-blue logo for her millennium project celebrating the United States' past and future with the approach of 2000. "It is designed to use our national symbols to force us to look toward the horizon, a horizon of promise and opportunity that we think really does represent what is the American spirit: always looking toward the future," she told a small group of reporters.
NEWS
July 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
The bodies of two men missing since a deadly fireworks explosion aboard an Illinois barge were found Saturday in the Mississippi River. One other man also was killed in that blast during a holiday weekend that was marred by fireworks accidents. In Babylon, N.Y., two 21-year-old men were critically injured Saturday, when a rocket they thought was a dud blew up in their faces. Raymond Irizariy and Michael Fragnola suffered third-degree burns.
NEWS
July 5, 1997 | From Reuters
A 135-pound furniture delivery worker from Japan wolfed down 24 1/2 hot dogs in 12 minutes Friday to edge a 100-pound countryman and a 330-pound American and win the world hot dog eating contest. Hirofumi Nakajima, 22, of Kiofu, Japan, broke his own world record and won the contest for a second year, defeating 22 challengers at Brooklyn's Coney Island, a New York City amusement park known for its roller coaster and its hot dogs.
NEWS
July 5, 1997 | From Times Wires Serves
The United States marked its 221st birthday with the usual cookouts, fireworks and flag-waving parades--including the nation's oldest continuously held Fourth of July parade in Bristol, R.I. Historic, but not tradition-bound, the 2.6-mile parade--started in 1785 as a prayerful walk to celebrate independence from Britain--now includes beauty queens, a phalanx of sailors, eight drum-and-bugle corps, teams of aerobic dancers in spandex and a trumpet-playing Elvis.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was dark, late and cold, but Kim Watrous and three of his buddies would not budge from their post on a dirt shoulder along Cactus Avenue early Sunday morning. The four Vietnam veterans had come to the gate of March Air Force Base outside Riverside with a clear purpose in mind. "We wanted to let these Marines know they're welcome home just as much as those who arrived yesterday," said Watrous, standing beside his red Chevrolet truck adorned with an assortment of American and military flags.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For three painful hours on Tuesday, Mary Hunter thought her Marine husband was dead. When military officials released an early list of American POWs turned over by the Iraqis on Tuesday, the name of Chief Warrant Officer Guy L. Hunter Jr. was not on it. "I just lost it--I thought the worst," said Mary Hunter, whose husband was among the first POWs captured when his military reconnaissance plane was downed in the southeastern Kuwaiti desert.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tickets have been mailed, the bleachers have been nailed and the inaugural speech that President Clinton will deliver to a global audience is being carefully pieced together. A home-shopping television show for souvenir buffs was recently announced. Even a horse manager, sort of an equestrian traffic cop, has been tapped for duty. "When you run a parade, you have a lot of animals," said Kiki Moore, a spokeswoman for the president's inaugural committee.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
While parade-goers took to the streets Wednesday to celebrate the new year, others spent the day off lingering at brunch or bowl games--and one school district was holding classes. In Philadelphia, a cast of 20,000 sequined, painted comedians cracked jokes and played banjos during the 97th annual Mummers Parade in the morning chill. "The weather doesn't bother us: We're snowmen!" shouted a white-faced Bob Aloi, a Mummer for 40 years.
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