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United States Commission On International Religious Freedom

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2001 | Religion News Service
The head of a federal commission on religious freedom overseas is urging the Bush administration's special envoy to Sudan to help persuade the Sudanese government to peacefully end the country's 18-year-old civil war. In his letter to former Sen. John Danforth, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom Chairman Michael K.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
When the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom took testimony in Los Angeles this week on North Korea's human rights abuses, local Korean Americans were pleased that the federal agency was showing such concern about the persecution of Christians above the 38th parallel. In a world convulsed by ethnic tensions and religious conflicts, the commission has been busy documenting such human rights violations since it was created by Congress in 1998.
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NEWS
December 9, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite giving lip service to the cause of religious freedom, the Clinton administration has been extremely timid in its enforcement of a 2-year-old law imposing sanctions on governments that practice or condone faith-based persecution, a federal watchdog commission said Friday. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
At a hearing Tuesday of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, witnesses denounced North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il as "the worst" violator of human rights in the world today. The independent federal watchdog agency, in session at the UCLA School of Law, held its first public hearing in Los Angeles before a large crowd made up mostly of Korean Americans. The topic was "North Korea: Human Rights Ground Zero."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
When the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom took testimony in Los Angeles this week on North Korea's human rights abuses, local Korean Americans were pleased that the federal agency was showing such concern about the persecution of Christians above the 38th parallel. In a world convulsed by ethnic tensions and religious conflicts, the commission has been busy documenting such human rights violations since it was created by Congress in 1998.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
At a hearing Tuesday of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, witnesses denounced North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il as "the worst" violator of human rights in the world today. The independent federal watchdog agency, in session at the UCLA School of Law, held its first public hearing in Los Angeles before a large crowd made up mostly of Korean Americans. The topic was "North Korea: Human Rights Ground Zero."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | Times staff and wire reports
President Clinton has named a Muslim leader from Glendale and a retired scholar who lives in the Inland Empire community of Alta Loma to two of the three remaining open seats on the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom. Dr. Laila Al-Marayati, past president of the Muslim Women's League, and Firuz Kazemzadeh, external affairs secretary of the U.S. National Spiritual Assembly of Bahais, will join the commission.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Many people who come to the United States seeking political asylum are treated like criminals, in some cases held in prisons and jails, a federal commission said Tuesday. Some asylum seekers are shackled, kept in solitary confinement or strip-searched, the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom said in a report required by Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2001 | Religion News Service
The head of a federal commission on religious freedom overseas is urging the Bush administration's special envoy to Sudan to help persuade the Sudanese government to peacefully end the country's 18-year-old civil war. In his letter to former Sen. John Danforth, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom Chairman Michael K.
NEWS
December 9, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite giving lip service to the cause of religious freedom, the Clinton administration has been extremely timid in its enforcement of a 2-year-old law imposing sanctions on governments that practice or condone faith-based persecution, a federal watchdog commission said Friday. The U.S.
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