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BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER
There has been a strange confluence of events and near-events this week involving several of the most important industries in America, and collectively they tell an enlightening tale of power and politics in the 1990s. It's a tale that can be interpreted in several different ways, but one central lesson is inescapable: It is the evolution of political ideology, more than any advances in technology, that is changing the shape of the nation's communications industries.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush nominated two Republicans on Friday to fill vacancies on the Federal Communications Commission, giving newly appointed FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell strong political allies in his pursuit to streamline the agency and deregulate the communications industry. Bush said he planned to appoint Kevin J. Martin, currently special assistant to the president for economic policy, and Kathleen Q.
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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Thursday broke a decade-long impasse over telecommunications reform and approved a sweeping measure that lawmakers said will spur competition and profoundly affect every American who watches TV, accesses a computer on-line service or talks on the telephone.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | ESTHER SCHRADER and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 14-hour plane flight ahead of him and a schedule jammed with sensitive meetings on the other end, a senior White House official slipped a disk filled with classified data into his laptop computer to review en route. A mid-level CIA officer, driving from an audience with a foreign intelligence contact, murmured his impressions of the meeting into a hand-held device that he later downloaded into his computer at agency headquarters.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
The FBI scrambled to explain a new wiretapping proposal Thursday after a notice about it in the Federal Register produced an outcry from citizen watchdog groups, which claimed that the plan smacked of Big Brotherism. While Justice Department officials said that the proposal had been misunderstood, an official of the Center for National Security Studies said that the Justice Department had failed to make it clear. The Oct.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ending years of delay and deadlock, the House on Tuesday adopted landmark legislation that rewrites the rules governing the communications industry, paving the way for an era of reduced regulation and increased competition among telephone companies and cable television operators. Lawmakers from across the ideological spectrum joined in support of two companion bills that represent the most fundamental change in federal rules for communications firms since the depths of the Great Depression.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though Congress failed to rewrite the nation's telecommunications laws this year to spur competition, private industry efforts to wire the nation for interactive TV, electronic home shopping and other advanced communications services will likely intensify in 1995.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton Administration retreated Wednesday from its efforts to control the method of scrambling private communications on the information superhighway when it said the federal standard will apply only to telephone conversations, not to computer exchanges. The announcement is a significant victory for the U.S. computer software industry.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1993 | By JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore on Tuesday called for the biggest overhaul of the nation's communications laws in more than half a century, launching an anticipated White House effort to transform the electronic network that provides Americans with telephone, data and television services. Gore, a key advocate of government efforts on behalf of advanced technology, outlined an ambitious legislative initiative that would throw the $300-billion-a-year telecommunications business wide open to competition.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago New Year's Day, an amazing thing happened. America's beloved old phone company buckled to judicial pressure and broke itself into pieces. The results were remarkable. Long-distance calls got so cheap they grew routine. Fax machines, answering devices and multi-line households became ubiquitous. Taken together, the value of AT&T and its former segments tripled. But the telecommunication changes of the past decade will pale next to the revolution ahead.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A vexing racial divide is developing on the Internet as America's blacks and Latinos fall further behind whites in accessing the booming global computer network, the government says. The Commerce Department's third annual examination of the Internet across the nation found big increases in the number of Americans going online.
NEWS
June 25, 1998 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wall Street investors and federal regulators on Wednesday signaled that they expect the proposed merger of the largest long distance company and the dominant cable operator to intensify competition in the telecommunications industry and lead to broader consumer choices. But the financial market drove down the price of AT&T Corp. shares amid concerns about the rich price the company had agreed to pay for Tele-Communications Inc.
NEWS
May 21, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 50 years since legendary science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke proposed the idea of bouncing communications signals off a relay station in space, Americans have come to rely on satellites to do such everyday things as watching TV, using pagers and talking on wireless phones.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
AT&T Corp. and 13 other U.S. and Asian phone companies, among them Singapore Telecommunications Ltd., will begin building the first undersea fiber-optic cable for transmitting phone calls connecting China and the U.S. early next year. The companies signed an agreement Thursday to build the $1.1-billion, 18,600-mile cable, which will connect the U.S. to China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan and Guam.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
The FBI scrambled to explain a new wiretapping proposal Thursday after a notice about it in the Federal Register produced an outcry from citizen watchdog groups, which claimed that the plan smacked of Big Brotherism. While Justice Department officials said that the proposal had been misunderstood, an official of the Center for National Security Studies said that the Justice Department had failed to make it clear. The Oct.
NEWS
August 5, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved a landmark overhaul of the nation's antiquated telecommunications laws Friday that would free up competition in the telephone, cable and broadcasting industries, as well as mandate a new technology allowing parents to block violent and sexual programming on their television sets.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Clinton Administration redoubling its effort to modernize the nation's information infrastructure, a once-sleepy arm of the Commerce Department that is advising the President on the issue is suddenly rising to political prominence. At center stage is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, a Commerce unit that evolved from the Office of Telecommunications Policy created by then-President Richard M. Nixon in 1970.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decade of the 1990s may see a revolution in personal communications that will rival the computer revolution of the 1980s, as those familiar devices--the telephone and the television--undergo sweeping changes. By the mid-1990s, the trendy consumer is likely to tote a tiny, inexpensive telephone in his pocket as he walks down the street or flies across the country. At home, his television could display a picture as sharp as the finest color photograph.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | JONATHAN WEBER
There has been a strange confluence of events and near-events this week involving several of the most important industries in America, and collectively they tell an enlightening tale of power and politics in the 1990s. It's a tale that can be interpreted in several different ways, but one central lesson is inescapable: It is the evolution of political ideology, more than any advances in technology, that is changing the shape of the nation's communications industries.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Thursday broke a decade-long impasse over telecommunications reform and approved a sweeping measure that lawmakers said will spur competition and profoundly affect every American who watches TV, accesses a computer on-line service or talks on the telephone.
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