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NEWS
September 4, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoever wins the White House is likely to face a huge challenge dealing with Capitol Hill next year because neither major party expects to rack up substantial majorities in Congress in the November elections.
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NEWS
September 4, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whoever wins the White House is likely to face a huge challenge dealing with Capitol Hill next year because neither major party expects to rack up substantial majorities in Congress in the November elections.
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NEWS
February 28, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and RALPH FRAMMOLINO and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ten individuals who figure prominently in the controversy over foreign-linked donations to the Democratic Party also gave at least $158,160 in campaign money to members of Congress over the past eight years, an analysis of federal election records shows. Most of the political contributions went to Democratic lawmakers, among them Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, California Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, Rep.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national citizen's panel ended a series of intense debates over campaign finance reform Tuesday with a surprising call for full government financing of congressional elections, something most politicians believe the public would never tolerate. Public financing is the centerpiece of a broad call for change issued by 140 private citizens, including 23 from Los Angeles, who were randomly chosen by the League of Women Voters to contemplate the state of U.S. election-financing laws.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
When Rep. Martin Frost (D-Texas) became chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee last year, he got a needling call from Robert S. Strauss, the former party chairman. "I know why you took this job," Strauss said, "because things look so bad for the Democrats that if they lose nobody will blame you, and if they win you'll be a hero." In fact, Strauss had it "about right," says Frost.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Rev. Jesse Jackson made an emotional return to his civil rights roots Saturday, promising a nationwide drive to help Democrats retake Congress and evict Newt Gingrich from the House Speaker's chair. Jackson credited his Rainbow Coalition political action group for the victory of his son, Jesse Jackson Jr., in a congressional primary last week. He said the coalition would focus next year on key House and Senate seats needed to re-establish Democratic control on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The nation's two political parties are winding up the 1990 election campaign in a role reversal that provides Democrats with a potentially significant advantage in Tuesday's balloting. On the eve of decision day, the normally fragmented and defensive Democrats seem notably united and aggressive behind their newly revived campaign theme calling for increased economic fairness.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his popularity in national polls dropping below 50% for the first time and a major election only a week away, this is the dilemma President Bush faces: 1990 is shaping up as the year of the outsider and he is the ultimate insider. In recent days, Bush has tried to grab for an outsider's image. On Friday, for example, he endorsed measures to limit the terms of legislators and claimed that the budget deal painstakingly negotiated by his aides made him "gag."
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | BY THE TIMES' POLITICAL STAFF
BACK TO NORMAL: All the Republican dismay over the damage done to GOP candidates by President Bush's handling of the budget negotiations is obscuring what some analysts see as the larger point--that the election is settling into the normal pattern for a midterm contest, when the party in the White House typically suffers moderate losses in Congress.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and RALPH FRAMMOLINO and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ten individuals who figure prominently in the controversy over foreign-linked donations to the Democratic Party also gave at least $158,160 in campaign money to members of Congress over the past eight years, an analysis of federal election records shows. Most of the political contributions went to Democratic lawmakers, among them Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, California Sens.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and RALPH FRAMMOLINO and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ten individuals who figure prominently in the controversy over foreign-linked donations to the Democratic Party also gave at least $158,160 in campaign money to members of Congress over the past eight years, an analysis of federal election records shows. Most of the political contributions went to Democratic lawmakers, among them Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, California Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, Rep.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING and RALPH FRAMMOLINO and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ten individuals who figure prominently in the controversy over foreign-linked donations to the Democratic Party also gave at least $158,160 in campaign money to members of Congress over the past eight years, an analysis of federal election records shows. Most of the political contributions went to Democratic lawmakers, among them Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota, House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, California Sens.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | JACK NELSON, CHIEF WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
When Rep. Martin Frost (D-Texas) became chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee last year, he got a needling call from Robert S. Strauss, the former party chairman. "I know why you took this job," Strauss said, "because things look so bad for the Democrats that if they lose nobody will blame you, and if they win you'll be a hero." In fact, Strauss had it "about right," says Frost.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new breach is opening between President Clinton and many top House Democrats over what they see as his reluctance to throw his full weight behind efforts to retake control of their chamber in the fall elections. House Democrats, who were warmly praising Clinton for his stand in the budget fight only days ago, turned angry with him this week for suggesting that he can have only a limited benefit in campaigning to return them to office.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Rev. Jesse Jackson made an emotional return to his civil rights roots Saturday, promising a nationwide drive to help Democrats retake Congress and evict Newt Gingrich from the House Speaker's chair. Jackson credited his Rainbow Coalition political action group for the victory of his son, Jesse Jackson Jr., in a congressional primary last week. He said the coalition would focus next year on key House and Senate seats needed to re-establish Democratic control on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thursday's release of the complete list of 303 current and former members of Congress who wrote more than 24,000 overdrafts at the now-defunct House bank has heightened the sense of political peril that now pervades the halls of Congress. The 252 incumbents on the roster--along with 17 others on an earlier list of the worst abusers--fear that they may face a voter backlash over the issue in November, despite efforts by the Ethics panel and Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) to control the damage.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thursday's release of the complete list of 303 current and former members of Congress who wrote more than 24,000 overdrafts at the now-defunct House bank has heightened the sense of political peril that now pervades the halls of Congress. The 252 incumbents on the roster--along with 17 others on an earlier list of the worst abusers--fear that they may face a voter backlash over the issue in November, despite efforts by the Ethics panel and Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) to control the damage.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top White House officials Sunday sought to blame Democrats for increased taxes included in the budget agreement just passed by Congress, but Democratic officials predicted that fallout from the deficit package would help them make strong gains in the upcoming election.
NEWS
April 17, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. E. Thomas Coleman (R-Mo.) could hardly contain himself as the latest town meeting in his district got under way. "I thought you'd be happy to know that I didn't bounce any checks," he declared before anyone had a chance to ask. "I didn't even have an account." No matter. Voters here are so upset that some are ready to roast him even if he was not one of the 300-plus lawmakers who ran up overdrafts on their House bank accounts.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
Following are edition-time results of state elections across the country Tuesday. The results have been compiled from Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters and the Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service: ALABAMA MONTGOMERY--Democratic Sen. Howell Heflin, 69, the chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee, rolled over Republican challenger Bill Cabaniss to win a third term. With 86% of the precincts reporting, Heflin had 61% of the votes to Cabaniss' 39%.
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