Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Congressional Elections 1992
IN THE NEWS

United States Congressional Elections 1992

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a year of sudden reversals and political hairpin turns--when the improbable is no longer extraordinary--the one constant has been the voters' overwhelming hunger for a fundamental change in the nation's course. Over the past year, that current has been strong enough to carry forward presidential candidates who might have been viewed as eccentric under more placid circumstances: conservative columnist Patrick J. Buchanan, former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the state's deep recession, four California candidates were among the top five recipients nationwide of campaign funds in U.S. Senate races this year, according to a year-end report released by the Federal Election Commission. Barbara Boxer, a Marin County Democrat, collected and spent more than any Senate candidate in the United States, as her successful campaign raised and spent $10.3 million. The No.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Republican challenger to 17-term Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) is legally listed on the Nov. 3 ballot as Elias R. Non-Incumbent Zenkich. In California, meanwhile, campaign ads for Republican Sen. John Seymour do not even acknowledge that he is an incumbent. Faced with unrelenting criticism this year, incumbents in Congress are leaving Washington in droves. And many of those seeking reelection are downplaying their incumbency.
NEWS
November 7, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The influx of black and Latino members in next year's Congress is expected to not only increase the powers of minorities within the House Democratic caucus, but also smooth the way for the Clinton Administration's economic programs. Based on Tuesday's election results, membership in the House's Congressional Black Caucus will jump from 25 to an all-time peak of 38 in the next session, not counting non-voting delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton of Washington, D.C.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more House incumbents having lost primary races than in any year since World War II, members of Congress are experiencing powerful campaign jitters as they prepare to face angry voters in a year of extraordinary political uncertainty.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. William E. Dannemeyer, in a series of press conferences across the state today, will formally begin a quest for the U.S. Senate which promises to be a conservative crusade against an Orange County colleague and his brand of middle-of-the-road Republicanism. One of the nation's most conservative congressmen, the 61-year-old Dannemeyer (R-Fullerton) said he plans to paint incumbent Republican Sen.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | By Times Political Writers
DO THEY KNOW SOMETHING? Some of the Democrats' most-promising potential presidential candidates are running into an embarrassment. Folks back home are sending them a message: Don't bother challenging President Bush in 1992. Polls in Iowa and Arkansas show that most voters believe Sen. Tom Harkin and Gov. Bill Clinton, respectively, should not enter the presidential race. And 63% of Virginians say that Gov. L. Douglas Wilder should not run. West Virginia Sen. John D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Jim Silva said Wednesday that he is withdrawing his candidacy in the June Republican primary against incumbent U.S. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach). Silva said he made the decision to withdraw at the urging of Republican Party officials. Silva thus became the second Orange County city official to withdraw from the GOP primary in as many days. On Tuesday, Mission Viejo Councilman Robert A.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In one of the lingering outposts of optimism in the battered Golden State, Republican Tom Campbell is raising money for his U.S. Senate bid outside a house so large the bathrooms have signs on their doors: "Men" and "Ladies." On the lawn, a lush green denial of the drought, Campbell spins into his stump speech. Behind him, the setting sun brilliantly illuminates the southern San Francisco Bay, bouncing breathtakingly off the San Mateo Bridge and the San Francisco skyline in the distance.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California is by no means the only state in the nation that--according to the polls--seems determined to send career politicians packing. Voters coast-to-coast appear poised to strike a major blow for congressional term limits on Nov. 3 by passing proposals to curb legislative tenures in as many as 13 other states. The effort to restrict the terms of representatives and senators is on so many ballots that some have suggested it is tantamount to a national referendum.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Women and minorities made historic gains in Senate and House races Tuesday in an election that greatly changed the face of Congress and yet returned a vast majority of incumbents to office. More than 100 new members will be sworn in when Congress convenes in January. But most of the newcomers were elected to fill seats in which incumbents did not seek reelection. Spurred by the House banking and post office scandals and other factors, incumbents retired from Congress in record numbers this year.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a year of sudden reversals and political hairpin turns--when the improbable is no longer extraordinary--the one constant has been the voters' overwhelming hunger for a fundamental change in the nation's course. Over the past year, that current has been strong enough to carry forward presidential candidates who might have been viewed as eccentric under more placid circumstances: conservative columnist Patrick J. Buchanan, former California Gov. Edmund G. (Jerry) Brown Jr.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | ART PINE and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives have been buffeted by so many tumultuous political forces since voters last went to the polls that the turnover when it next convenes is expected to be unusually high. Going into Tuesday's election, 86 new members of the 435-member House are assured, largely due to retirements and the defeats of several incumbents in primaries.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California is by no means the only state in the nation that--according to the polls--seems determined to send career politicians packing. Voters coast-to-coast appear poised to strike a major blow for congressional term limits on Nov. 3 by passing proposals to curb legislative tenures in as many as 13 other states. The effort to restrict the terms of representatives and senators is on so many ballots that some have suggested it is tantamount to a national referendum.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mug shot of former savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr., with prison numbers under his chin, flashes on local television screens. Appearing next to it: A smiling photo of Democratic Sen. John Glenn of Ohio, the former astronaut and the first American to orbit the Earth. For Glenn, 71, who is accustomed to being honored as a national hero, it is a humiliating experience to be identified in his opponent's political commercials as a collaborator with a notorious convicted felon.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Republican challenger to 17-term Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) is legally listed on the Nov. 3 ballot as Elias R. Non-Incumbent Zenkich. In California, meanwhile, campaign ads for Republican Sen. John Seymour do not even acknowledge that he is an incumbent. Faced with unrelenting criticism this year, incumbents in Congress are leaving Washington in droves. And many of those seeking reelection are downplaying their incumbency.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question came like a shot at House Speaker Thomas S. Foley during an otherwise friendly town meeting. "We pay $60,000 a year for your limousine driver," said Todd Pascoe, a 23-year-old college senior. "Couldn't we at least make a start on the deficit by eliminating that?" Obviously annoyed, Foley rejected the premise and the suggestion. "First of all, it's not $60,000--it's less than that--and he's not a limousine driver. He's a police sergeant, my security officer."
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the state's deep recession, four California candidates were among the top five recipients nationwide of campaign funds in U.S. Senate races this year, according to a year-end report released by the Federal Election Commission. Barbara Boxer, a Marin County Democrat, collected and spent more than any Senate candidate in the United States, as her successful campaign raised and spent $10.3 million. The No.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Above the portal of the now-defunct House bank, these words are etched in stone: "We Have Built No Temple But the Capitol." Originally a reminder that the aim of public service is the public good, the words seem now more like a reproachful admonition of how far Congress has strayed, at least in the public's mind, from the spirit of the inscription.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more House incumbents having lost primary races than in any year since World War II, members of Congress are experiencing powerful campaign jitters as they prepare to face angry voters in a year of extraordinary political uncertainty.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|