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United States Congressional Elections 2000

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | SUE FOX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most San Fernando Valley-area congressional representatives face no opposition in the March 7 primary, but seven open seats in Assembly and state Senate districts promise lively local contests. Friday was the filing deadline for candidates to enter the primary. In Valley-area races, there are three open seats in the Senate and four in the Assembly. Here's a district-by-district look at the races.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Democrat Jane Harman and Republican Rep. Steve Horn held on to their leads Tuesday in Southern California's two closest House races, as the Los Angeles County registrar-recorder updated a near-final vote count. In South Bay's 36th District, Harman picked up 2,877 votes, bringing her total to 111,981. Her opponent, incumbent Rep. Steven T. Kuykendall (R-Rancho Palos Verdes), gained 3,002 votes, bringing his total to 108,186. With Harman at 48.3% and Kuykendall at 46.
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NEWS
March 15, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They vowed to serve as citizen-legislators, immune to the blandishments of power. They promised to relinquish their House seats after just a handful of two-year terms. Their pledges seemed unequivocal. But today, some are exhibiting symptoms of that dread disease: Potomac Fever. And its onset could have a significant impact on the 2000 election. Of the eight House Republicans whose commitments to leave office come due next year, three are openly considering reneging.
NEWS
November 6, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a prominent Democratic senatorial candidate was killed in a plane crash last month, the party's chances of winning the Senate were widely assumed to have been lost. But as the titanic battle for control of both chambers in Congress reaches its climax Tuesday, this unpredictable political year has been marked by yet another surprise: The Senate remains up for grabs.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Now that he's won the keys to the House speaker's comfortable Capitol offices, Louisiana Republican Bob Livingston may want to think twice about unpacking all his bags. With the two parties operating at a fiercely fought parity, the election of 2000 is shaping up as a triple witching hour when control of the House, the Senate and the White House will all be up for grabs. "We are in a position where the two parties . . . are competitive for all three institutions," said Gary C.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday morning, Sen. John McCain announced grand plans for a late-August bus tour to campaign for Republican congressional candidates. By lunchtime, the Republican National Convention's opening program was showcasing the party's top House and Senate contenders. And throughout this week, party elders will be linking up congressional aspirants with potential donors.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only black Republican in Congress announced Monday that he will run for reelection this year rather than leave the House at the end of this session, saving Republicans from a scramble to try to replace him as chairman of the House GOP Conference. Ending months of suspense over rumors that he was about to leave the House, Rep. J.C. Watts Jr. (R-Okla.) told a news conference that he has decided to run again, even though he supported a GOP plan in 1994 to limit congressional terms to six years.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Democrats in the House and Senate, who once believed Republicans might enjoy a permanent financial advantage in campaigns, say they are stunned to find that their campaign committees have more money going into this fall's elections, despite their minority status in both chambers.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guess who's not coming to the Democratic convention this week: Many of the candidates who will make or break the party's effort to win control of the House. Democrat Lauren Beth Gash plans to be going door-to-door in the Chicago suburbs, asking people to elect her to the House. In eastern Montana, Nancy Keenan intends to be barnstorming a bunch of tiny rural towns. In northern New Jersey, Maryanne Connelly is lined up to work the county fair crowds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | LAURA WIDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Democrat Jane Harman and Republican Rep. Steve Horn held on to their leads Tuesday in Southern California's two closest House races, as the Los Angeles County registrar-recorder updated a near-final vote count. In South Bay's 36th District, Harman picked up 2,877 votes, bringing her total to 111,981. Her opponent, incumbent Rep. Steven T. Kuykendall (R-Rancho Palos Verdes), gained 3,002 votes, bringing his total to 108,186. With Harman at 48.3% and Kuykendall at 46.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | RICHARD SIMON and JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the Nov. 7 election looming, endangered Rep. Steven T. Kuykendall (R-Rancho Palos Verdes) was running hard Friday--even if he was thousands of miles from his South Bay district. He hustled back and forth between the floor of the House--where he cast a vote to keep the government running for another 24 hours--and GOP congressional campaign headquarters--where he tried to campaign from a small cubicle with a telephone.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
Maria Cantwell, the Democratic Senate candidate in Washington, made a fortune at an Internet company she joined after she was swept from the U.S. House of Representatives during the Republican landslide in 1994. If she wins her challenge against veteran Republican Sen. Slade Gorton, the 42-year-old Cantwell will be the first senator with real roots in the computer and communications revolution transforming the American workplace.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He posed with cheering children and signed autographs for excited supporters. He schmoozed with donors and fielded questions from local reporters. All in all, vice presidential nominee Joseph I. Lieberman's visit Monday to his home state of Connecticut was another packed day in his campaign for . . . Senate?
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. William V. Roth Jr. would seem politically unbeatable: He is chairman of a powerful Senate committee, is known to just about everyone in his tiny home state of Delaware and has sky-high approval ratings among voters. But the five-term Republican is in a dogfight as he seeks reelection, challenged by another popular Delaware politician, Democratic Gov. Thomas R. Carper.
NEWS
August 13, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guess who's not coming to the Democratic convention this week: Many of the candidates who will make or break the party's effort to win control of the House. Democrat Lauren Beth Gash plans to be going door-to-door in the Chicago suburbs, asking people to elect her to the House. In eastern Montana, Nancy Keenan intends to be barnstorming a bunch of tiny rural towns. In northern New Jersey, Maryanne Connelly is lined up to work the county fair crowds.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | JEAN O. PASCO and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) has been dropped from the speakers' list at next week's Democratic National Convention and may face further reprisals from party officials after she rebuffed their requests Thursday that she not hold a fund-raiser at the Playboy Mansion. Jenny Backus, spokeswomen for the Democratic National Committee, announced that Sanchez--one of the group's co-chairs--would be removed as a speaker for her refusal to move the Tuesday night fund-raiser from the mansion.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | RICHARD SIMON and JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the Nov. 7 election looming, endangered Rep. Steven T. Kuykendall (R-Rancho Palos Verdes) was running hard Friday--even if he was thousands of miles from his South Bay district. He hustled back and forth between the floor of the House--where he cast a vote to keep the government running for another 24 hours--and GOP congressional campaign headquarters--where he tried to campaign from a small cubicle with a telephone.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
Maria Cantwell, the Democratic Senate candidate in Washington, made a fortune at an Internet company she joined after she was swept from the U.S. House of Representatives during the Republican landslide in 1994. If she wins her challenge against veteran Republican Sen. Slade Gorton, the 42-year-old Cantwell will be the first senator with real roots in the computer and communications revolution transforming the American workplace.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday morning, Sen. John McCain announced grand plans for a late-August bus tour to campaign for Republican congressional candidates. By lunchtime, the Republican National Convention's opening program was showcasing the party's top House and Senate contenders. And throughout this week, party elders will be linking up congressional aspirants with potential donors.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Democrats in the House and Senate, who once believed Republicans might enjoy a permanent financial advantage in campaigns, say they are stunned to find that their campaign committees have more money going into this fall's elections, despite their minority status in both chambers.
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