Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Contract
IN THE NEWS

United States Contract

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988
Environmental Monitoring & Services, based in Camarillo, was awarded a federal contract to operate pollution-monitoring systems along the Eastern United States. The contract, awarded by the Environmental Protection Agency, will at first provide the company with $483,800. But the amount could climb as high as $3.9 million if the monitoring program extends for five years as scheduled. The contract calls for Environmental Monitoring, a unit of Combustion Engineering of Stamford, Conn.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | From Reuters
Society must break its silence to tackle a growing epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases afflicting millions of U.S. women, National Institutes of Health director Bernadine Healy said last week. "Our society must confront this silent plague," Healy, who plans to step down in June, said in a speech to a civic group here. "It is a plague of staggering proportions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991 | RHONDA NOWAK
Medicare insurance will cover Pap smear screenings for about 33,000 elderly women in Ventura County, a Social Security spokeswoman says. The tests can detect cervical cancer in its early stages. Mary Ann Foushee, field representative for the Social Security Administration in Ventura, said previously that Medicare paid for Pap smears only for patients who were being treated for certain medical conditions, including some forms of cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER PUMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An environmental study of the proposed Weldon Canyon landfill is adequate, a group of county planners declared Wednesday, paving the way for a Board of Supervisors vote this summer. The Environmental Report Review Committee's decision came over the objections of environmentalists, who contend that the 2,000-page study failed to address sufficiently the threat of Valley Fever posed by the landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A combination of bone marrow transplants and very high doses of anti-cancer drugs may be able to double the survival rate of patients with advanced breast cancer, a Boston researcher reported last week. Dr. Karen Antman, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said that 58% of 259 patients given the new treatment regimen at 13 medical centers were free of cancer at the end of one year. Normally, fewer than 30% of patients given conventional therapy show similar success.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Bergen Brunswig Corp., said Thursday that it has won a seven-year contract valued at $6.3 billion to be the sole supplier of drugs, health and beauty aids, and over-the-counter medical products to Longs Drug Stores Corp., the sixth largest drug store operator in the United States. The contract is currently split between Bergen and No. 1 U.S. wholesaler McKesson HBOC Inc. Bergen said about 50% of the $900 million annual revenue will be new business. Orange-based Bergen, the third largest U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Three members of the dwindling ranks of Wernher von Braun's World War II German rocket team, which after the war helped put Americans on the moon, have died days apart. Max Nowak, 89, Heinrich Paetz, 88, and Albert Schuler, 83, were original members of von Braun's team of engineers who developed the V-1 and V-2 rockets that Nazi Germany used against Great Britain.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1986 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israel threw a coming-out party Monday night for the newest and grandest weapon in its military arsenal, a futuristic jet fighter, amid boasts by some that the plane will propel the country into the 21st Century and warnings by others that it will only lead to economic disaster. More than 2,000 invited guests were on hand here for the official debut of the Lavi, the product of by far the biggest and most expensive military-industrial project ever undertaken in the Jewish state.
NEWS
March 23, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With funding for space exploration squeezed by the federal budget shortfall, some lawmakers and Bush Administration officials are considering the use of Russian rockets, space capsules and other high-tech hardware to expand the reach of the U.S. space program. A group of NASA scientists arrived in Moscow last week to inspect a Soyuz space capsule to see if it could be used as a "lifeboat" to carry the crew of the planned Space Station Freedom back to Earth in the event of an emergency.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|