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NEWS
June 17, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years after Congress declared war on toxic waste, the Environmental Protection Agency is allowing the same companies that created the most dangerous problems to determine the scope of contamination and propose how to clean it up.
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NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration will issue a new rule today to make it harder for companies that have violated labor, tax or other federal laws to win government contracts, the Office of Management and Budget said Tuesday. The regulation, dubbed the "blacklisting" rule by industry critics, will take effect Jan. 19, one day before President Clinton's administration turns over the White House to Republican President-elect George W. Bush.
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NEWS
January 22, 1988 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian declared Thursday that he accepts full blame for California's loss of a $4.4-billion federal atom smasher project, saying, "If it makes some people happy to blame the governor, I'll take the responsibility." But Deukmejian insisted that the loss of that project and others in recent months does not mean that California is losing its high technology advantage to competing states.
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican vice presidential candidate Dick Cheney visited a motor home factory here Tuesday as his campaign aides sought to deflect allegations that his former company defrauded the government out of millions of dollars. Accusing the Clinton administration of playing politics with a federal grand jury, a Cheney spokeswoman questioned the timing of the criminal investigation into possible financial wrongdoing by Brown & Root, a Texas-based engineering firm overseen by Cheney until July.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Yosemite Park & Curry Co., owner of the hotels, restaurants and stores at Yosemite National Park, will be sold to a nonprofit foundation for a "bargain" $49.5 million under an agreement reached Tuesday between MCA Inc. and the U.S. Interior Department, Interior officials announced. "This is a very good deal," said National Park Service spokesman George Berklacy. Paul Pritchard, president of the National Parks and Conservation Assn., a park watchdog group, called it "a hell of a bargain."
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | Associated Press
The federal Centers for Disease Control misspent $6.6 million while conducting a disputed study of the effects of Agent Orange, a congressional study released Saturday said. The General Accounting Office said the money was spent on work by outside contractors that was not needed or couldn't be done because the CDC did not have a methodology ready to begin the work. Agent Orange was a herbicide sprayed by U.S. troops during the Vietnam War to remove jungle cover.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1991 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Given the conservative tilt of the nation these days, chances are nil that Congress or any state legislature will try to renew President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty, a war we've been losing badly since it began in the 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A security firm affiliated with Minister Louis Farrakhan's Nation of Islam won city approval Tuesday to begin patrolling 15 federally aided apartment buildings in a section of Venice that has experienced widespread gang activity and drug dealing. Tenant activists who first proposed hiring the group to guard their buildings cheered after the Los Angeles City Police Commission voted unanimously to grant a patrol permit for N.O.I. Security Agency, effectively ending the controversy.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Tuesday flatly rejected Iranian suggestions that the "ball is now in the American court" in the hostage stalemate. "The ball has always been in their court," Bush Administration spokesman Marlin Fitzwater insisted. "It will be as long as there are hostages yet to be released." The Administration response reflects President Bush's strategy of maintaining a relatively low profile on the issue and keeping attention focused on Iran and its Lebanese Shiite Muslim allies.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
A Chicago bank accused of job discrimination against women and minority employees has agreed to pay a record $14 million in back wages as restitution for past bias, the Labor Department announced Tuesday. The settlement by the Harris Trust & Savings Bank was the largest such award ever obtained by the federal government in a sex or race discrimination case and ended a 14-year legal struggle with the company.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000
A scrambling technique scripted by two Belgians has been chosen as the proposed U.S. government standard to protect sensitive data and help spur the digital economy, the Commerce Department said. The selection of the Rijndael data encryption formula capped a three-year competition among code-cracking experts to replace the aging U.S. benchmark. * * ASM Lithography Holding agreed to buy U.S. rival Silicon Valley Group Inc. for $1.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2000 | James F. Peltz
The Federal Aviation Administration awarded contracts valued at up to $120 million to three companies for advanced airport X-ray security machines. The companies are PerkinElmer Instruments in Long Beach, a unit of PerkinElmer Inc.; Rapiscan Security Products Inc. in Hawthorne; and Heimann Systems of Pine Brook, N.J.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of federal contracts awarded to U.S. small businesses has plummeted more than 20% in recent years, heightening concerns about so-called contract bundling on the nation's small firms. That is one of the findings of a procurement report card to be released today by Democrats on the House Small Business Committee.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First, there were the pigeons: hundreds that spent part of their day feeding in the garden of a rural English cottage, and part of their day brooding atop radiation-contaminated buildings at British Nuclear Fuel Ltd.'s Sellafield complex a few miles away. The garden was found to be so contaminated that workers in protective suits had to come in, wring the necks of 700 radioactive pigeons and dispose of them as low-level nuclear waste.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Harold Urman and Gwen Uman face a special kind of Y2K stress: A two-year federal contract that has been the mainstay of their research consulting firm's business is coming to an end Dec. 31. Planning ahead, allocating resources to marketing and capitalizing on their contacts are all tactics they've used to smooth the transition. Urman was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein. Gwen and I met and formed a partnership while we were both graduate students at USC.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1999 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposal to relax rules governing which firms can call themselves minority-owned has ignited fierce protests by minority business organizations. Next month, the National Minority Supplier Diversity Council, whose policies are followed widely by corporations, will consider allowing certain firms to keep their minority designation if investors dilute the minority owner's interest to as little as 25%. Current rules require companies to be 51% minority-owned to receive minority certification.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Electronic Data Systems, personified by founder H. Ross Perot's dash and legendary determination, is a well-known powerhouse in the booming $4-billion computer services business. On the other hand, Computer Sciences Corp., headed by unassuming William Hoover, comes across as sort of a corporate milquetoast. "I'm not very good at talking about myself," Hoover said. So how is low-key CSC doing against its better-known rivals? "They are on a tear," said Stephen T.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Department of Energy formally accepted the design of the superconducting super collider, clearing the way for Texas to buy 1,700 acres of land outside Dallas as the site of the atom smasher. Deputy Energy Secretary W.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computer Sciences Corp. is no stranger to monumental challenges. When the royal family of Saudi Arabia wanted to set up a computer system for tracking the millions of foreign Muslims who make pilgrimages to mecca every year, it turned to CSC. And when the Federal Aviation Administration needed a new program that would enable air-traffic controllers to guide 60 million planes through U.S. airspace, it too called on the low-profile firm based in El Segundo.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
U.S. officials, who on Monday halted clinical research at the Duke University Medical Center, lifted the suspension Friday in response to the prestigious teaching hospital's extensive new plans to strengthen safeguards for people in studies. The action, which reinstates the medical center's license to do federally funded studies on people, allows Duke researchers to go back to work on most of the 2,000 projects that the abrupt ban threw into turmoil.
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