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NEWS
January 30, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
When Herbert Iske returned to California after nine grueling months in the Pacific theater in World War II, he assumed the veterans parades and salutes and bands were meant for him too. He was wrong: As a member of the U.S. merchant marine, Iske soon discovered that, in the eyes of his country, he was not a "veteran" of the war at all.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2007 | David J. Garrow, Special to The Times
YOU know the name "Woodward," as in Bob Woodward, whose insider-based accounts of Washington decision-making have been runaway bestsellers since Richard Nixon's downfall. Well, now you should remember the name Greenburg because ABC News reporter Jan Crawford Greenburg's account of what's been happening at the U.S. Supreme Court in recent years is the richest and most impressive journalistic look at the panel since Woodward co-wrote "The Brethren" in 1979.
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NEWS
January 20, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A divided federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the death sentence of a black man convicted of raping and killing a Montana school teacher, even though a dissenting judge insisted that Dewey E. Coleman "in all likelihood would not be facing execution if he were white." In one of the most sweeping opinions the court has rendered on capital punishment, the U.S.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush intends to nominate Circuit Court Judge Roger Gregory to a permanent seat when he makes his first judicial nominations next week, officials said, resurrecting a nomination that GOP senators once strangled. The administration and congressional officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Virginia lawyer is among several whose names are being circulated to key senators. If nominated and confirmed, he would become the first permanent black judge on the U.S.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new federal courthouse planned for downtown Santa Ana will increase more than 60% in size and more than double in cost, to $168 million, under government plans about to be forwarded to Congress. The increases, due to inaccurate estimates by federal agencies, have led to a round of finger-pointing and rankled Orange County congressmen who have pushed hard for the project.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Children often find themselves in the middle of a tug of war when their parents get divorced. The scene is played out thousands of times a year in courtrooms across the country: A man and a woman realize that their crumbling marriage cannot be saved, so one or each of them files for divorce. If they have children, custody becomes an issue. And when both parents want custody, the result is often an emotional battle in which their kids are caught in the cross-fire.
NEWS
June 6, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
In this town of reproach and recrimination, it seems increasingly clear that publishing well is the best revenge. In that spirit, one of the latest to join the parade of let-me-tell-you-my-side authors is Robert H. Bork, the former appeals court judge who was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Reagan but was rejected by the Senate. His version of the events is contained in "The Tempting of America," to be published in November by the Free Press. But at a preview-of-coming-attractions press briefing at the annual convention of American Booksellers Assn.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge has frozen $320 million in Swiss and Hong Kong bank accounts that were secretly set up by late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real imposed the freeze last week after lawyers representing Philippine torture victims in a lawsuit persuaded the judge that the money might be spent by Marcos' widow and children before the suit concludes.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen-year-old Jean-Pierre Bosze died of leukemia here Monday, two months after losing a bitter, landmark legal battle over whether relatives could be forced to undergo medical procedures which might have helped save his life.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush intends to nominate Circuit Court Judge Roger Gregory to a permanent seat when he makes his first judicial nominations next week, officials said, resurrecting a nomination that GOP senators once strangled. The administration and congressional officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Virginia lawyer is among several whose names are being circulated to key senators. If nominated and confirmed, he would become the first permanent black judge on the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Atty. Alejandro N. Mayorkas, the highest-ranking federal prosecutor in Southern California, announced Thursday that he will step down from his post April 20. Mayorkas, a Democrat, is one of 93 U.S. attorneys across the country, almost all of whom are being replaced by the new Republican administration. The 41-year-old Mayorkas denied that his departure was hastened by his role in the recent presidential pardon controversy. Mayorkas contacted the White House on behalf of Carlos Vignali Jr.
NEWS
June 30, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Federal judges took more than 12 expense-paid trips to seminars put on by conservative groups but failed to disclose the resort trips on their annual financial reports, as required by federal ethics laws, documents and interviews show. The excursions, some of which lasted two weeks and cost thousands of dollars, were devoted to discussions of economics and the environment.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | Associated Press
The House took aim Thursday at what Republicans called abuses in class-action lawsuits, passing legislation that would move most such suits into federal courts. Most Democrats, federal judges and the White House opposed the measure, saying it would make it harder for individuals to seek redress for wrongdoing by companies and clog the federal court system.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid a growing national clamor for toughened gun control, a new study released Saturday shows that the number of federal weapon cases has dropped more than a third in recent years, with California lagging far behind the rest of the nation.
NEWS
August 11, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, condemning the failure of current criminal justice policies, on Tuesday proposed a potentially radical restructuring of the nation's local court systems to prevent convicts from shuttling in and out of prisons "again and again and again." Reno's plan essentially would create special courts authorizing judges to oversee the reentry of inmates into society and to supervise their rehabilitation through work, education and community programs, aides said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1999
Superior Court Judge Florence-Marie Cooper has been nominated by President Clinton to serve on the Federal District Court in Los Angeles, it was announced Wednesday. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, (D-Calif.) recommended Cooper's appointment April 30, and the White House formally announced the selection Wednesday. Cooper, whose appointment must still be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, has spent her entire legal career in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chicago Cubs on Thursday won the first round of a legal fight with Commissioner Fay Vincent to block his mandated realignment of the National League. U.S. District Judge Suzanne B. Conlon, in Chicago, approved the Cubs' request for a preliminary injunction that temporarily halts the realignment process and ruled that Vincent exceeded his authority in ordering the Cubs into the West Division after the club had exercised its rights under the National League constitution and vetoed the move.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to allegations of civil rights abuses by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies, a federal judge issued an unusual order Monday requiring the Sheriff's Department to adhere to its rules governing use of force and to begin sending him every brutality complaint lodged against the department. U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With children and violent crime now inextricably linked in the national consciousness, one of America's most widely imitated judicial innovations of this century, the Juvenile Court system, is under fire. Indeed, even as serious crime by youth has been in decline in recent years, shocking spasms of violence--in country classrooms or on big city streets--threaten a juvenile justice system that transformed the perception of children here and around the world. "I'm very concerned.
NEWS
June 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
Arizona's parental consent law is unconstitutional because it lacks a time limit for a judge to decide on an abortion for a minor who cannot consult her parents, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a federal judge's rejection of the 1996 law, which has never been enforced. An antiabortion lawyer denounced the ruling and said he hoped the state would appeal it to the U.S. Supreme Court.
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