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NEWS
January 3, 1998 | From Associated Press
The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, reacting to criticism from the chief justice of the United States, said Friday that President Clinton should bear much of the blame for the backlog of vacant federal judgeships. "The Senate cannot confirm judges that the president does not nominate, nor can the Congress implement litigation reform the president opposes," said Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah). In his year-end report on the federal judiciary, Chief Justice William H.
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NEWS
November 8, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The U.S. Senate confirmed Friday, by a 93-6 vote, the nomination of Los Angeles attorney Christina A. Snyder to be a U.S. District Court judge. Snyder, a graduate of Pomona College and Stanford Law School, was nominated by President Clinton in May 1996. An active Democrat, she was one of several judicial candidates whose bids have been stalled because of objections by conservatives. Snyder waited 14 months for a hearing by the Senate Judiciary Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
If ever there was an unlikely candidate to be the target of a militant campaign against "judicial activism," it would be Los Angeles lawyer Margaret Mary Morrow. An honors graduate of Harvard Law School, Morrow, 47, was the first female president of the California Bar Assn., where she worked to strengthen the state's attorney discipline system.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Blame it on a Senate Republican stall, a weak White House or the natural byproduct of divided government, but the result is that 102 federal judgeships--one in eight--are now vacant. In California alone, 10 of the 51 federal trial judgeships are open, as are nine of the 28 positions on the San Francisco-based U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over several Western states.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The two parties may have reached a temporary budget truce, but the inherent tensions between a Republican Congress and Democratic president are spilling over into a power struggle focusing on the government's third branch--the federal judiciary. Mobilized by a determination to stamp out what they call "judicial activism," Senate Republicans last month vowed to keep anyone who fits under that hazy and controversial rubric from getting on the federal bench.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Investor attorneys are increasingly using state courts to bring fraud lawsuits against companies in an apparent attempt to circumvent a new federal law, a Securities and Exchange Commission study found. The law, passed by Congress in December 1995 over President Clinton's veto, seeks to curb frivolous class-action complaints by investors in federal court.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing California's rapidly growing population of Latin American Indians, advocates for immigrant rights called on court administrators statewide Thursday to recognize the pressing need for interpreters in the pre-Columbian languages of Mexico and Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
The 1990 Civil Justice Reform Act, a large-scale experiment aimed at cutting costs and delays in the federal courts, has failed to have much effect on either problem, according to a five-year study released Wednesday by Rand's Civil Justice Institute.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drug offenders accounted for nearly a third of the 872,200 felony convictions in state courts in 1994, the Justice Department reported. Property crimes made up nearly another third. Violent crimes were responsible for less than one in five state felony convictions that year, the department's Bureau of Justice Statistics reported.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring the morale and quality of the federal judiciary is at stake, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is calling on Congress to give judges a cost-of-living raise. Federal judges, who now make $133,600 a year, "need and have earned" more money, especially since many could be making heftier salaries as top-tier private lawyers, Rehnquist said in his year-end message on the federal courts.
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