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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
If ever there was an unlikely candidate to be the target of a militant campaign against "judicial activism," it would be Los Angeles lawyer Margaret Mary Morrow. An honors graduate of Harvard Law School, Morrow, 47, was the first female president of the California Bar Assn., where she worked to strengthen the state's attorney discipline system.
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NEWS
July 17, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Blame it on a Senate Republican stall, a weak White House or the natural byproduct of divided government, but the result is that 102 federal judgeships--one in eight--are now vacant. In California alone, 10 of the 51 federal trial judgeships are open, as are nine of the 28 positions on the San Francisco-based U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which has jurisdiction over several Western states.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Investor attorneys are increasingly using state courts to bring fraud lawsuits against companies in an apparent attempt to circumvent a new federal law, a Securities and Exchange Commission study found. The law, passed by Congress in December 1995 over President Clinton's veto, seeks to curb frivolous class-action complaints by investors in federal court.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing California's rapidly growing population of Latin American Indians, advocates for immigrant rights called on court administrators statewide Thursday to recognize the pressing need for interpreters in the pre-Columbian languages of Mexico and Guatemala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
The 1990 Civil Justice Reform Act, a large-scale experiment aimed at cutting costs and delays in the federal courts, has failed to have much effect on either problem, according to a five-year study released Wednesday by Rand's Civil Justice Institute.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drug offenders accounted for nearly a third of the 872,200 felony convictions in state courts in 1994, the Justice Department reported. Property crimes made up nearly another third. Violent crimes were responsible for less than one in five state felony convictions that year, the department's Bureau of Justice Statistics reported.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring the morale and quality of the federal judiciary is at stake, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is calling on Congress to give judges a cost-of-living raise. Federal judges, who now make $133,600 a year, "need and have earned" more money, especially since many could be making heftier salaries as top-tier private lawyers, Rehnquist said in his year-end message on the federal courts.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landing in court doesn't mean quite what it used to. More than half of civil cases that once were lodged in a federal courthouse now end up in private arbitration. To a considerable degree, the trend reflects the delays and high costs of settling disputes in government courts, which have made scant use of the information technology that private arbitration groups are embracing.
NEWS
October 26, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, speaking at a convention here, called finding ways to resolve conflicts without lawyers and courts one of the key challenges of the 21st century. Mediators, arbitrators and ombudsmen cheered Reno as she championed their efforts to offer "better solutions, more creative solutions and more long-lasting solutions" to the often bitterly divisive conflicts of average Americans.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nine members of the anti-government "freemen" yelled and interrupted the judge as they were being formally charged with various federal crimes in Billings, Mont. "You're going down, son," Steven Charles Hance, one of the freemen, told U.S. Magistrate Richard Anderson as he was being led from the courtroom. When Assistant U.S. Atty. James Seykora asked the court to hold Hance in contempt, Hance yelled out: "Contempt? That's not a strong enough word."
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