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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing California's rapidly growing population of Latin American Indians, advocates for immigrant rights called on court administrators statewide Thursday to recognize the pressing need for interpreters in the pre-Columbian languages of Mexico and Guatemala.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
The 1990 Civil Justice Reform Act, a large-scale experiment aimed at cutting costs and delays in the federal courts, has failed to have much effect on either problem, according to a five-year study released Wednesday by Rand's Civil Justice Institute.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drug offenders accounted for nearly a third of the 872,200 felony convictions in state courts in 1994, the Justice Department reported. Property crimes made up nearly another third. Violent crimes were responsible for less than one in five state felony convictions that year, the department's Bureau of Justice Statistics reported.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Declaring the morale and quality of the federal judiciary is at stake, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is calling on Congress to give judges a cost-of-living raise. Federal judges, who now make $133,600 a year, "need and have earned" more money, especially since many could be making heftier salaries as top-tier private lawyers, Rehnquist said in his year-end message on the federal courts.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landing in court doesn't mean quite what it used to. More than half of civil cases that once were lodged in a federal courthouse now end up in private arbitration. To a considerable degree, the trend reflects the delays and high costs of settling disputes in government courts, which have made scant use of the information technology that private arbitration groups are embracing.
NEWS
October 26, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, speaking at a convention here, called finding ways to resolve conflicts without lawyers and courts one of the key challenges of the 21st century. Mediators, arbitrators and ombudsmen cheered Reno as she championed their efforts to offer "better solutions, more creative solutions and more long-lasting solutions" to the often bitterly divisive conflicts of average Americans.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nine members of the anti-government "freemen" yelled and interrupted the judge as they were being formally charged with various federal crimes in Billings, Mont. "You're going down, son," Steven Charles Hance, one of the freemen, told U.S. Magistrate Richard Anderson as he was being led from the courtroom. When Assistant U.S. Atty. James Seykora asked the court to hold Hance in contempt, Hance yelled out: "Contempt? That's not a strong enough word."
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | Associated Press
A federal appeals judge who was sharply criticized by Sen. Bob Dole resigned Tuesday and warned that efforts to "Willie Horton-ize the federal judiciary" would damage public confidence in the courts. "In the current political campaign, enforcement of constitutional rights is equated with being soft on crime," U.S. Circuit Judge H. Lee Sarokin said in a letter to President Clinton, adding that he planned to resign effective July 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996
President Clinton has nominated lawyer Christina A. Snyder of Beverly Hills to a federal district judgeship in Los Angeles. U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) recommended Snyder, 48, to Clinton for the position in January. A Los Angeles native, Snyder is a graduate of Pomona College and Stanford Law School. She has been in private practice in Los Angeles since 1972, specializing in antitrust and securities litigation, and is a partner at Corinblit & Seltzer, a mid-Wilshire firm.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly four years, liberal activists who follow the federal courts have repeatedly pronounced themselves disappointed with President Clinton. To fill vacant seats on the federal bench, Clinton and his advisors have sought out veteran prosecutors, experienced judges and state officials. They have shied away from liberal academics and civil right activists. Nonetheless, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
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