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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
President Clinton has nominated U.S. District Judge Richard A. Paez, the first Mexican American to serve as a federal trial judge in Los Angeles, to a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The nomination, announced Friday, was praised by local attorneys and Paez's colleagues on the federal trial bench here and by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), who urged Clinton to nominate Paez for the district court in 1993. Paez was confirmed by the Senate for that position in June, 1994.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1995
The U.S. Senate confirmed U.S. Chief Magistrate Judge George King, who has worked in the Los Angeles federal courthouse since 1987, for a seat on the district court bench, it was ennounced Friday. King, who declined to comment, was a federal prosecutor from 1974-79 before he turned to private practice, specializing in civil business litigation. King, 43, was recommended for the post in January by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his high school years, U.S. District Judge Gary L. Taylor used to bring his girlfriends to the Broadway Theatre, on almost the exact site where ground was broken Thursday for his future office: Orange County's first federal courthouse. Though everyone from the mayor of Santa Ana to the chief judge of the U.S. District Court teases him about that fact, Taylor couldn't be happier.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate said Tuesday that Mexico's law enforcement Establishment appears to be infected by "massive corruption," as evidenced by a scandal involving Mario Ruiz Massieu, that nation's former top anti-drug official. While harshly criticizing the system itself, U.S. Magistrate Ronald Hedges made no immediate ruling on the Mexican government's request for extradition of Ruiz Massieu, held in U.S.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, joining a growing national move toward arbitration of civil disputes, said Thursday that the Justice Department will begin assigning some of its 170,000 civil cases each year to outside arbitrators. Signing an order to implement the change, Reno said that she wants to resolve cases "more swiftly and at less cost to those involved--a result that is in everybody's interest."
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | JOAN BISKUPIC, THE WASHINGTON POST
At a time when television viewers have ready access to the drama of state court trials, the nation's top federal judges voted Tuesday to keep cameras out of federal courtrooms. In a secret vote, the policy-making U.S. Judicial Conference rejected a recommendation that would have expanded to all courts a pilot project that allowed cameras at civil trials and appeals in eight courts. The judges also voted to keep an absolute ban on cameras at federal criminal trials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Facing the harshest professional discipline of his career, Stephen Yagman was taking an uncharacteristic course. He was keeping his mouth shut. Such circumspection was a change of pace for the veteran Venice civil rights lawyer, whose proclivity for outrageous comments landed him in trouble in the first place.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | MARK PLATTE and JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a national day of mourning for Richard Nixon, federal courthouses and administrative offices throughout the country will be closed today with one conspicuous exception: the Central District of California, which includes Nixon's home base of Orange and Los Angeles counties. The irony is not lost on federal officials.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | The Washington Post
The Republican-appointed majority on the U.S. Court of Appeals in the District of Columbia has denounced the work of a task force looking into race and gender bias in the federal courts and voted last Friday to withdraw its support for the project. Three appeals judges--Stephen F. Williams, Laurence H. Silberman and Douglas H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to boost the local economy and accommodate an increase in court caseloads in Southern California, a U.S. Senate committee on Thursday authorized spending $123 million to build a new federal courthouse here.
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