Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Courts
IN THE NEWS

United States Courts

NEWS
June 14, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate said Tuesday that Mexico's law enforcement Establishment appears to be infected by "massive corruption," as evidenced by a scandal involving Mario Ruiz Massieu, that nation's former top anti-drug official. While harshly criticizing the system itself, U.S. Magistrate Ronald Hedges made no immediate ruling on the Mexican government's request for extradition of Ruiz Massieu, held in U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, joining a growing national move toward arbitration of civil disputes, said Thursday that the Justice Department will begin assigning some of its 170,000 civil cases each year to outside arbitrators. Signing an order to implement the change, Reno said that she wants to resolve cases "more swiftly and at less cost to those involved--a result that is in everybody's interest."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Facing the harshest professional discipline of his career, Stephen Yagman was taking an uncharacteristic course. He was keeping his mouth shut. Such circumspection was a change of pace for the veteran Venice civil rights lawyer, whose proclivity for outrageous comments landed him in trouble in the first place.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | The Washington Post
The Republican-appointed majority on the U.S. Court of Appeals in the District of Columbia has denounced the work of a task force looking into race and gender bias in the federal courts and voted last Friday to withdraw its support for the project. Three appeals judges--Stephen F. Williams, Laurence H. Silberman and Douglas H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to boost the local economy and accommodate an increase in court caseloads in Southern California, a U.S. Senate committee on Thursday authorized spending $123 million to build a new federal courthouse here.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | from Associated Press
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist is urging President Clinton and the Senate to fill 113 vacant federal judgeships in 1994, including some that have gone unoccupied for the past four years. "There is perhaps no issue more important to the judiciary right now than this serious judicial vacancy problem," Rehnquist wrote in his year-end report on the federal courts.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the simple cartoon begins, a sleeping figure resembling a crash dummy is seen from above, lying in bed. The man suddenly awakens as the first of eight gunshots is fired in his direction. Walking down a corridor, the gray figure is hit by shots in the arm, the chest and finally the head. He crumples and falls to the floor. The three-minute color segment may not win any awards as entertainment.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Orange County Congressman Christopher Cox said Wednesday that construction of a new federal courthouse in Santa Ana will proceed as planned, after a last-minute delay ordered by Clinton Administration budget watchers. The official announcement is expected to be made today in Washington by the General Services Administration. It removes the final obstacle to construction of the courthouse and clears the way for a groundbreaking ceremony scheduled for July 15.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an attempt by American investors to sue Lloyd's of London for fraud in U.S. courts. The high court without comment let stand lower court rulings that the 110 U.S. investors in Lloyd's--known as "names"--must use British courts to pursue their grievances against the insurer's governing bodies and certain agents and syndicates. Richard Rosenblatt of Rancho Santa Fe, coordinator of the American Names Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has recommended to President Clinton that he appoint Audrey B. Collins, the highest-ranking African-American in the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, to a U.S. District Court judgeship, according to legal and political sources. Collins, 48, would become the fourth black federal trial judge in Los Angeles if Clinton accepts Feinstein's recommendation, which is considered likely.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|