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NEWS
June 5, 1996 | Associated Press
A federal appeals judge who was sharply criticized by Sen. Bob Dole resigned Tuesday and warned that efforts to "Willie Horton-ize the federal judiciary" would damage public confidence in the courts. "In the current political campaign, enforcement of constitutional rights is equated with being soft on crime," U.S. Circuit Judge H. Lee Sarokin said in a letter to President Clinton, adding that he planned to resign effective July 31.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996
President Clinton has nominated lawyer Christina A. Snyder of Beverly Hills to a federal district judgeship in Los Angeles. U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) recommended Snyder, 48, to Clinton for the position in January. A Los Angeles native, Snyder is a graduate of Pomona College and Stanford Law School. She has been in private practice in Los Angeles since 1972, specializing in antitrust and securities litigation, and is a partner at Corinblit & Seltzer, a mid-Wilshire firm.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly four years, liberal activists who follow the federal courts have repeatedly pronounced themselves disappointed with President Clinton. To fill vacant seats on the federal bench, Clinton and his advisors have sought out veteran prosecutors, experienced judges and state officials. They have shied away from liberal academics and civil right activists. Nonetheless, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
President Clinton has nominated U.S. District Judge Richard A. Paez, the first Mexican American to serve as a federal trial judge in Los Angeles, to a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The nomination, announced Friday, was praised by local attorneys and Paez's colleagues on the federal trial bench here and by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), who urged Clinton to nominate Paez for the district court in 1993. Paez was confirmed by the Senate for that position in June, 1994.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno said Thursday that in the aftermath of the O.J. Simpson verdicts she will recommit herself to making the criminal justice system "as fair as I can, and make it appear to be fair" While saying that "one jury verdict should not reflect on a whole system," Reno remarked on the debate raging across the nation about the fairness of the verdicts and the factors underlying them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1995
The U.S. Senate confirmed U.S. Chief Magistrate Judge George King, who has worked in the Los Angeles federal courthouse since 1987, for a seat on the district court bench, it was ennounced Friday. King, who declined to comment, was a federal prosecutor from 1974-79 before he turned to private practice, specializing in civil business litigation. King, 43, was recommended for the post in January by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his high school years, U.S. District Judge Gary L. Taylor used to bring his girlfriends to the Broadway Theatre, on almost the exact site where ground was broken Thursday for his future office: Orange County's first federal courthouse. Though everyone from the mayor of Santa Ana to the chief judge of the U.S. District Court teases him about that fact, Taylor couldn't be happier.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal magistrate said Tuesday that Mexico's law enforcement Establishment appears to be infected by "massive corruption," as evidenced by a scandal involving Mario Ruiz Massieu, that nation's former top anti-drug official. While harshly criticizing the system itself, U.S. Magistrate Ronald Hedges made no immediate ruling on the Mexican government's request for extradition of Ruiz Massieu, held in U.S.
NEWS
April 7, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, joining a growing national move toward arbitration of civil disputes, said Thursday that the Justice Department will begin assigning some of its 170,000 civil cases each year to outside arbitrators. Signing an order to implement the change, Reno said that she wants to resolve cases "more swiftly and at less cost to those involved--a result that is in everybody's interest."
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | JOAN BISKUPIC, THE WASHINGTON POST
At a time when television viewers have ready access to the drama of state court trials, the nation's top federal judges voted Tuesday to keep cameras out of federal courtrooms. In a secret vote, the policy-making U.S. Judicial Conference rejected a recommendation that would have expanded to all courts a pilot project that allowed cameras at civil trials and appeals in eight courts. The judges also voted to keep an absolute ban on cameras at federal criminal trials.
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