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NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Saturday directed federal law enforcement officials to work more closely with local authorities to thwart illegal gun sales and expand the prosecution of criminals who use guns. Seated by Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, two police chiefs and other officials, Clinton said in his weekly radio address that the Justice and Treasury departments would report to him with "a plan to reduce gun violence by applying proven local strategies to fight gun crime nationwide."
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NEWS
March 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Saturday directed federal law enforcement officials to work more closely with local authorities to thwart illegal gun sales and expand the prosecution of criminals who use guns. Seated by Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, two police chiefs and other officials, Clinton said in his weekly radio address that the Justice and Treasury departments would report to him with "a plan to reduce gun violence by applying proven local strategies to fight gun crime nationwide."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993
As a staunch supporter of and participant in community-based policing in the Devonshire Division and the 12th Council District, I felt outraged after reading the June 12 article, "L.A. Will Use Anti-Graffiti Surveillance Teams." The article stated that the video surveillance idea will be tested in three downtown divisions and implemented citywide if it succeeds. How insulting this is for those of us who have worked diligently and been successful in implementing this very program a year and a half ago. Not only have we made arrests by working with the senior lead and reserve officers in Devonshire, but most of those arrests have led to convictions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2008 | Ann M. Simmons
A hearing on a defense motion to dismiss murder and conspiracy charges against a Japanese national accused in his wife's 1981 slaying in downtown Los Angeles ended Friday without a ruling. Torrance Superior Court Judge Steven Van Sicklen continued the case against Kazuyoshi Miura, now 61, who was found guilty of his wife's murder in Japan in 1994, but was later acquitted. Mark Geragos, who is representing Miura, argued that his client can't be tried for the crime in the United States without unconstitutionally placing him in double jeopardy.
WORLD
August 20, 2002 | From Associated Press
Mexican prosecutors brought immigrant-smuggling charges Monday against 11 people who allegedly worked for a ring that left 14 Mexican men to die in the Arizona desert last year. The arrest of the alleged smugglers over the weekend, together with U.S. convictions against three other smugglers, has reportedly dealt a severe blow to the ring. However, Mexico's Justice Department said in a statement that the suspected top leaders of the ring had fled a raid in the Mexican border city of Nogales.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Saturday signed separate legislation imposing tougher penalties against insider trading and against contractors who cheat the government. The first is designed to counter the wave of insider trading scandals that rocked Wall Street. It doubles the maximum criminal penalties for insider trading from five years in jail to 10 years, and raises fines from $500,000 to $2.5 million for a company and from $100,000 to $1 million for an individual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Retired LAPD Lt. Jimmy Sakoda stepped before no less than 11 TV cameras and dozens of reporters Saturday to speak about a Los Angeles homicide case he has followed for more than 25 years. Dressed in a dapper dark suit and gray tie, Sakoda offered no new details about the convoluted case involving Kazuyoshi Miura, a Japanese businessman who allegedly conspired to kill his wife on a downtown Los Angeles street in 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1994
"W hy doesn't Japan have problems like this? They don't have guns on the street. We've got to have stronger laws or we're going to kill each other off." --Erica Stenta, a student at Marymount College Stenta's plaintive call for tougher gun control laws echoes across the nation as we mourn the murders in San Pedro of two much-admired college students from Japan. Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura were gunned down in a carjacking last Friday at a supermarket parking lot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1993 | ANDREW LePAGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's an anonymous tip police yearn for but rarely get: "Some dudes I know said they're going to smoke some guys . . . Saturday night behind a grocery store in Thousand Oaks." The tip is fictitious--a radio ad that several stations play at no charge for Ventura County Crime Stoppers. The group offers anonymity and up to a $1,000 reward for information that leads to the filing of charges in a felony.
OPINION
July 2, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
You just can't out-gloom an environmentalist. The Atlantic invited some luminaries to answer the question "How and when will the world end?" Some contributions were funny. Others simply plausible - a volcanic eruption from underneath Yellowstone National Park is frightfully overdue. But only an environmentalist like Bill McKibben could be a killjoy about the apocalypse itself. The environmental activist and writer declares the question moot. "In a sense, the world as we knew it is already over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With strong backing from police, the City Council voted Wednesday to make Los Angeles the first city in California to prohibit the sale of more than one handgun per month to anyone. The ordinance signed into law Wednesday is aimed at "straw purchasers," people who buy large numbers of firearms and then sell them to criminals, minors and others not legally allowed to own a gun.
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