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NEWS
January 29, 1989 | ITABARI NJERI, Times Staff Writer
"Nobody Knows My Name," James Baldwin wrote. At the deepest level of the collective African-American psyche, the title was a metaphor for the blighting of black history and culture before the nadir of slavery and since. Now, at the end of the 20th Century, which historian W. E. B.
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NEWS
August 9, 2001 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The list of inventions that have truly changed the world is short. But by almost any standard, the roster should include the little machine introduced 20 years ago this Sunday by the world's biggest computer company. The IBM personal computer, unveiled Aug. 12, 1981, was not the first PC on the market. Nor was it the cheapest, the most powerful or the most technically advanced.
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NEWS
June 30, 1993 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One suspects Bill Clinton is a cuddler. As a toucher nonpareil--a hugger of vice presidents, cabinet secretaries and utter strangers at political rallies--he exudes great physical warmth. It's easy to imagine him cozying up on a sofa with Hillary and Chelsea, passing the corn chips and bean dip back and forth as they watch reruns of "Designing Women."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The radical evolution in design that changed the way Americans saw common objects--from domestic appliances to buildings--occurred within 15 years of the 1925 World's Fair in Paris. That revolution is the subject of the traveling exhibition "American Modern, 1925-1940: Design for a New Age." The show will open Saturday at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach, its only West Coast stop. Bulky, banal appliances were reshaped into seamless, futuristic gadgets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1999 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Have you ever told a coal miner in West Virginia or Kentucky that what he needs is individual initiative to go out and get a job where there isn't any?" --Robert F. Kennedy, August 1964 * "There ain't never been no jobs here," says David Bowling, one of 13 grown children of Iree and Bascum Bowling of Mudlick Hollow in eastern Kentucky. "This place is a plain hole in the wall. Right there . . .
SPORTS
October 2, 1994 | BOB OATES
Not even three months after the World Cup dominated U.S. sports pages, soccer has once again dipped low in the American consciousness. Now, soccer is trying to organize a major league here. It won't work. At World Cup time last summer, some Americans were caught up in a passing fancy. There was a fleeting interest in a sport that will never make it in this country for these, among other reasons: * Although it's a good children's sport--appealing to many youngsters in America and other lands--U.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A breaching whale on the sea of American demographics, the baby boom generation shocked its elders early on. They rocked out with Elvis, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. As teen-agers and young adults, they turned to civil rights, the women's movement and anti-war protests, launching an entire fashion industry of rainbow-hued hippie clothes in the process.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Rap music is not polite. It's a noisy 'n' crude attack on mainstream sensibilities that has even liberal-minded adults who were raised on the rebellious, outlaw beat of Little Richard and the Rolling Stones asking themselves, "What happened to real music?"
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mannequins stand poised in a Westside store window, their hats bearing an "X," symbol of a fallen black hero. The red, black and green colors of black nationalism shine on a teen-ager's medallion--the boy with Filipino roots wears Africa on his chest. And in white suburbia, homes pulsate with a slang and rhythm first given voice by African-American youth on urban streets.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the solemn, wood-and-marble chambers of the U.S. district courthouse here, a federal judge is weighing one of modern America's most vexing questions: What is the true meaning of a velvet Elvis? Nothing says kitsch better than a fuzzy, black, air-brushed painting of the King. But when does campy fun infringe on the trademark image of a rock 'n' roll legend?
SPORTS
February 25, 2001 | BILL PLASCHKE
I have raced my Chevy through a straightaway of barren oaks, high into the curve past the Chick-fil-A, past porch swings and splintered basketball goals and a yard sale with fork lifts. I have sprinted through rolling hills and reproducing Cracker Barrels directly into the middle of one-half mile of red clay, in the shape of an oval, like that stretched and frayed collar on the white T-shirt around the neck of Roger Hamrick. "You're from where?" he asks.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ranks of single people have skyrocketed over the last three decades. The marriage rate in the United States was 8.3 per 1,000 adults in 1998, a University of Michigan study found, the lowest since 1958. Since the advent of the birth control pill and the feminist movement, the proportion of women ages 25 to 35 who have never been married tripled since 1970. Some adults never marry, a rate that has jumped from 16% to 23% since 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | JASON SONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dale Evans was buried Saturday, many saw the service as representing not just the death of an American icon but also a reminder that a pop culture was coming to an end. In the past several years, most of the actors known as singing cowboys, who graced the silver screen through the 1950s, have died: "Queen of the West" Evans last Wednesday, her husband, Roy Rogers, and Gene Autry in 1998, and Rex Allen in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of 2001, Calendar brought together three pairs of high-profile creators and administrators from disparate parts of the entertainment and arts world to candidly discuss issues of the day. In this first installment, "Law & Order" creator Dick Wolf sat down with Grammy-winning record producer Rick Rubin to reflect on a year's worth of controversy over content that stretched from Hollywood to Capitol Hill. Are artists' rights in danger?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2000 | DON SANDERS and SUSAN SANDERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drive-in movie theaters have a long and rich history in Southern California--not surprising given the mild climate and Hollywood in its backyard. In fact, during the height of the drive-in movie theater boom between the mid-'50s and mid-'60s, there were more than 50 locations here, from Oxnard to Huntington Beach, Los Angeles to Loma Linda. The world's first drive-in theater (Richard Hollingshead came up with the concept) opened in Camden, N.J., on June 6, 1933.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES ARTS WRITER
The Culture Wars that consumed the arts world in the last decade have quieted, but a new kind of armament is taking place. Once virtually defenseless against attacks from conservatives, arts leaders are aggressively aiming to reestablish the stature of arts and culture in American life. Around the country, think tanks, foundations, academics and researchers are drawing up a wide range of empirical evidence designed to defend and define the civic role of culture in America.
NEWS
February 12, 2001 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The ranks of single people have skyrocketed over the last three decades. The marriage rate in the United States was 8.3 per 1,000 adults in 1998, a University of Michigan study found, the lowest since 1958. Since the advent of the birth control pill and the feminist movement, the proportion of women ages 25 to 35 who have never been married tripled since 1970. Some adults never marry, a rate that has jumped from 16% to 23% since 1970.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
By most accounts, it started five years ago with the release of "The Big Chill"--the film that introduced a whole new generation to Vietnam Angst, free love and such '60s classics as "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" way before those dancing raisins did. Other trend watchers point to New York fashion designer Stephen Sprouse's revival of neon-bright miniskirts in 1984 as a key influence.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | From Hartford Courant
The New Yorker, which recently celebrated its 75th anniversary with a grand cultural festival in its namesake city, is just a pup compared with Harper's magazine. The venerable journal of American literature and thought, which began publishing before the Civil War, celebrates its 150th anniversary in the June issue with a special collector's edition. And as with every issue of Harper's, it's packed with excellent reading.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonald's in France has faced the ire of ransacking peasants and the scorn of a president known for relishing calves' heads more than cheeseburgers. This week, the attacks on the U.S. fast-food giant crossed a threshold when a bombing killed one of its employees. Denis Hennequin, president and CEO of McDonald's France, begged his countrymen Friday to stop thinking of his chain as anything other than restaurants staffed by industrious employees.
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