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BUSINESS
August 8, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
After two years of currency devaluations everywhere else, is it America's turn? The kingpin of global currencies, the U.S. dollar, has been sinking fast in recent weeks against the Japanese yen and the euro. The dollar got a slight reprieve on Friday. It ended at 114.73 yen, up 0.43 yen from Thursday. The euro was unchanged at $1.076. But in early July the dollar was worth 122.5 yen, and it took less than $1.03 to buy one euro. The dollar's losses so far have hardly been severe.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
After two years of currency devaluations everywhere else, is it America's turn? The kingpin of global currencies, the U.S. dollar, has been sinking fast in recent weeks against the Japanese yen and the euro. The dollar got a slight reprieve on Friday. It ended at 114.73 yen, up 0.43 yen from Thursday. The euro was unchanged at $1.076. But in early July the dollar was worth 122.5 yen, and it took less than $1.03 to buy one euro. The dollar's losses so far have hardly been severe.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, going along with a Cabinet-level recommendation, agreed Friday to remove Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea from the list of developing nations eligible to export a wide variety of goods to the United States without paying duties. The move, which goes into effect in about a year, is expected to have only a relatively minor effect on consumers, since it would add less than $500 million in cost to products from the four rapidly growing Asian countries.
WORLD
July 23, 2005 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
China's move this week to reform its currency system set the nation on a path to greater financial independence and stronger integration with global markets. It also marked a milestone in China's dramatic rise from a poor communist state to a powerful force in the world economy. But the shift also creates new challenges for a country already facing mounting domestic and foreign pressures, largely resulting from its booming growth.
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