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United States Currency

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years it was tucked away in a safe deposit box, but soon a rare two-tailed coin will be in the national spotlight. The 1965 Washington quarter-dollar struck from two reverse dies has been authenticated by one of the nation's top coin certification services, which estimated its value at between $75,00 and $100,000. The coin's owner, an Encino-based collector and dealer, will display the unusual quarter for the first time next month at the American Numismatic Assn.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The dollar fell to a six-month low against the euro Monday as U.S. stocks tumbled on concern last week's terrorist attacks will sink the world's biggest economy into recession. Foreign investors sold dollars after dumping U.S. stocks, analysts said. It took 92.40 cents to buy a euro, up from 92.07 late Friday. But the dollar inched up against the yen, ending in New York at 117.73 yen from 117.29 Friday, after an early dive. The dollar's recent weakness concerns traders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999
Currency is made by the government's master craftsmen, who use engraved plates and printing equipment designed for that purpose. Most counterfeiters use a photomechanical or "offset" method to make a printing plate from a photograph of a genuine note. You can help guard against taking counterfeit notes by becoming more familiar with United States money. Look at the currency you receive.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dollar, strongman of world currencies for most of the last six years, has dropped 9% against the euro since early July, cheering both U.S. manufacturers and European politicians--but unnerving some global investors. The dollar also has eased against the Japanese yen, despite continued economic woes in Japan.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful of the skills and machinery of high-tech counterfeiters, the Treasury Department announced Wednesday the first major redesign of U.S. currency since 1929, unveiling plans for a new $100 bill with an off-center, and much larger, portrait of Benjamin Franklin. The revised C-note will be available starting in 1996, with new bills for smaller denominations issued later. By the year 2000, new versions of all bills from $1 to $100 will be in circulation.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government of Iran, in an unorthodox effort to ease its own budget deficit and make trouble for the American economy, is printing and circulating billions of dollars of counterfeit U.S. $100 bills, a congressional report charged Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sense of crisis swept Japan Wednesday as the dollar fell in Tokyo to yet another post-World War II low. "I can't think of any way to describe our feelings except to say that we're in shock," said Minoru Tsukada, spokesman for Oki Electric Industry Co., a leading manufacturer of communications equipment. "We never expected that the yen would get this strong." His comment reflected virtually universal sentiment here as the currency fell to a new global low of 88.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the age of the $5 cup of coffee, people no longer covet those little disks of silver and copper that fall between the sofa cushions. Pennies are deemed passe, and no one gives a plug nickel for the dime. A quarter barely cuts it at the wishing well, and when was the last time someone besides the Tooth Fairy spent a Kennedy half dollar? But next week, Orange County residents will be asked to change the way they think about change.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1995 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dollar's recent rise against major currencies has provided an immediate boon to travelers and a promise of lower prices for buyers of costly foreign goods. However, the strengthened dollar hurts investors in some U.S. and foreign stocks and bonds. Although it's not clear whether the dollar will continue to gain, here are some questions and answers on how the greenback's comeback is already affecting consumers and investors: * Q: How will the dollar's rise help vacationers?
BUSINESS
August 15, 1994 | From Reuters
In a bid to curb widespread use of U.S. dollar bills, the Vietnamese government has served notice that most foreign currency will have to be channeled through banks beginning Oct. 1. The aim of the measure decided by Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet is to control an estimated $600 million now circulating in dollar notes and to increase use of the Vietnamese dong, a senior government economist said.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
The dollar rose in early trading today, halting a four-day decline against the yen, after leaders from the eight biggest industrialized nations didn't focus on currencies during their weekend summit, erasing concerns that President Bush might ask to stem the dollar's rise. U.S. Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill also reiterated Sunday, "I believe a strong dollar is in the interest of the United States." The U.S. currency rose to 123.53 yen from 122.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years it was tucked away in a safe deposit box, but soon a rare two-tailed coin will be in the national spotlight. The 1965 Washington quarter-dollar struck from two reverse dies has been authenticated by one of the nation's top coin certification services, which estimated its value at between $75,00 and $100,000. The coin's owner, an Encino-based collector and dealer, will display the unusual quarter for the first time next month at the American Numismatic Assn.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | From Bloomberg News and Times Staff
Can anything stop the dollar? The U.S. currency surged Thursday to an eight-month high against the euro and a three-month high against the yen as traders continued to judge the U.S. economy's prospects superior to its rivals'. It took 83.64 cents to buy a euro Thursday in New York, down from 84.78 cents Tuesday and the weakest level for the euro since October. Meanwhile, one dollar bought 125.77 yen in New York, up from 124.45 Tuesday and the most since 126.80 on April 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2001 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police arrested four people and seized $3,000 in fake bills in a raid on a La Habra home suspected of hiding a counterfeiting operation, authorities said Saturday. Investigators believe the operation was partly responsible for a spike in the number of reports of fake money being passed in the La Habra area over the last few months, police said.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The classic buffalo nickel will be celebrated by the U.S. Mint--88 years after it was first circulated--as a new commemorative silver dollar benefiting the National Museum of the American Indian, which is under construction on the Mall. The Commission of Fine Arts unanimously approved the design Thursday, which resembles the nickel designed by James Earle Fraser, showing a profile of an American Indian on one side and a buffalo on the other. Treasury Secretary Paul H.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Police in Kentucky are looking for a customer who succeeded in paying for a $2 order at a fast-food restaurant with a phony $200 bill featuring a picture of President Bush and a depiction of the White House with a lawn sign saying, "We like broccoli." Authorities say the female cashier at a Dairy Queen in Danville even gave the culprit $198 in change. The cartoonish bill also depicted an oil well on one side of the bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three-quarters of all the paper money in Los Angeles has some amount of cocaine or some other drug stuck to it, according to a federal appeals court decision that vividly illuminates how extensively the drug trade touches mainstream commerce. On the average, of every four bills in circulation in Los Angeles, more than three have traces of cocaine or another illicit drug stuck to the paper, according to the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1988 | From Reuters and
A sudden surge in the value of the dollar has thrown a wrench in the works of the mammoth money-making machine known as the Tokyo stock market. The dollar's strength has stoked fears of inflation, higher interest rates and of a flow of Japanese funds to dollar-denominated investments. The dollar last week burst through the 130-yen level and is approaching the psychological point of 132 yen. It closed at 131.70 here Monday, matching its previous traded high for 1988 posted on Jan. 18.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The dollar rallied against the yen to its highest level in nearly 1 1/2 years Monday amid mounting worries over Japan's fragile economy. In stock trading, most foreign markets showed relatively modest changes, with Wall Street closed for the Martin Luther King Day holiday. In foreign trading, the dollar topped 119 yen, up from 118.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2001 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tiny nation of El Salvador started the new year with a new official currency: the U.S. dollar--the same dollar that migrants to California and elsewhere have been sending home to families at a rate of more than $1 billion a year. But by Thursday, after four days of chaos, Salvadorans already were nostalgic for their old money. Counterfeit dollars turned up in ATMs. Lines backed up at supermarkets as cashiers struggled with hand calculators to convert currencies.
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