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January 5, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preparing to leave office after a period of historic change in the American military, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney predicted Monday that his successor will become more conservative as he steps into his new role and cautioned him not to base "long-term national security policy on the assumption that all is well in Moscow." In a wide-ranging farewell interview 17 days before leaving office, Cheney said that his successor, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
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NEWS
January 19, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force and Air National Guard are pushing to cut back round-the-clock air patrols over some U.S. cities, saying the unprecedented security flights are straining their planes, pilots and crews, senior Pentagon officials said Friday. "That was never intended to be a permanent thing," said Air Force Secretary James Roche, referring to the 24-hour-a-day homeland defense flights being flown since Sept. 11 over Washington, New York and other cities.
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NEWS
April 19, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
U.S. warships and aircraft sank or heavily damaged six Iranian navy ships Monday as a major confrontation erupted in the Persian Gulf in the wake of the United States' early morning strike against two Iranian oil platforms, the Reagan Administration said. U.S. and Iranian forces fired on each other in the broadest and most direct conflict yet, suddenly escalating what for months had been a war of nerves in the volatile waterway. After ordering U.S.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People who have worked with Sen. Carl Levin know the technique: He'll peer at them over the reading glasses perched on his nose, and the questions will pour forth in a cascade. "He'll pound away with the questions, then pound some more, until finally the person will give up and say, 'I don't know--I'll have to get back to you,' " said Martin Hamburger, a former Levin campaign aide.
NEWS
August 7, 2000 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were America's first sentries in the Cold War, built on hilltops and in Southland neighborhoods in an era when "duck and cover" became a classroom drill and children learned to recognize the flash of a nuclear explosion. Now, one of the last of 16 Nike missile sites dotting Orange and Los Angeles counties is being demolished this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2000 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were America's first sentries in the Cold War, built on hilltops and in Southland neighborhoods in an era when "duck and cover" was a classroom drill and children learned to recognize the flash of a nuclear explosion. Now, one of the last of 16 Nike missile sites dotting Orange and Los Angeles counties is being demolished this month.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Northrop Corp. is developing a secret missile that is supposed to be invisible to enemy radar, but the weapon's bloated cost has become an all-too-familiar sight on the company's balance sheet. Intended to be one of the Pentagon's most advanced weapons, the missile is the tri-service standoff attack missile, known as TSSAM. (Tri-service refers to its ability to be launched by Air Force and Navy aircraft, and by Army units on the ground.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore, courting a major veterans' group his Republican rival addressed the day before, said Tuesday that he would back a military pay raise to keep the U.S. military the "best-trained, best-equipped, best-led fighting force in the entire world, bar none." Gore, who ended a four-day riverboat trip down the Mississippi on Monday, took pains to counter rival George W. Bush's portrayals of a U.S. military in disrepair.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Specially trained National Guard units will help local and state officials respond to potential terrorist attacks from chemical, biological or even nuclear weapons, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said Tuesday. "These teams will arrive quickly, assess the scene and help ensure these affected areas get the federal assistance" they need, Cohen said in a speech at the National Press Club.
NEWS
September 30, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a barbed-wire fence, maintenance workers were busy Sunday removing nuclear bombs from B-52s. For the first time in 40 years, the planes would sit with their bellies empty. The "alert" facility here, home base for the men and women who were poised for war on a moment's notice, was a ghost town Sunday. Nearly everyone had gone home. "It's kinda like winning the war," said Capt. Bruce Adams, a B-52 bomber commander who has served eight years at Fairchild, intermittently on alert.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After talks with a top Russian official in Moscow, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice was upbeat Wednesday about the chances of a U.S. agreement with Russia on the Bush administration's plans for a missile shield. With the U.S. and Russia poised for talks that could shape a new post-Cold War security framework, Rice expressed America's eagerness to press ahead and jettison the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty, which bans deployment of a national missile shield.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pressured Moscow on Monday to agree to reduce nuclear weapons and rethink its opposition to a U.S. missile shield, but said he is prepared to develop a missile defense without Russian accord. One day after Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, with Bush at his side after two hours of meetings, disclosed that the United States and Russia would negotiate offensive and defensive weapons in tandem, Bush displayed an impatience to get moving.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As dusk approaches today, Air Force technicians at Vandenberg Air Force Base will launch a missile toward a collision in outer space that could have far-reaching effects back on Earth. If the target missile is struck and obliterated by a high-tech "kill vehicle" launched from a South Pacific atoll, the Bush administration will have a powerful new argument for its proposal to accelerate the controversial missile defense program.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's campaign to rebuild the armed forces, already facing resistance from some in Congress and the military, now confronts what may be its most formidable obstacle: a tightening federal budget. President Bush's proposed defense spending increase for next year is the largest since 1985, yet the $33-billion request could be scaled back sharply to fund health, education and other programs, lawmakers and defense analysts say.
NEWS
July 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Defense Department said it would try to intercept a long-range ballistic missile July 14, the first systemwide test by the Bush administration of a controversial multibillion-dollar missile defense plan. The "integrated system" test is often equated by the military to hitting a bullet with a bullet. The last two of the three tests to date have failed, most recently July 7, 2000. Those misses led former President Clinton on Sept.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld will ask Congress for authority to cut the Air Force B-1 bomber fleet by one-third and eliminate those now operated at bases in Georgia and Kansas, senior defense officials said. The decision drew complaints from the Georgia and Kansas congressional delegations, which accused the Bush administration of playing politics. The decision is part of the administration's amended fiscal 2002 budget request.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | From Associated Press
The undetected flight of a Soviet-built MIG from Cuba to Key West, Fla., exposed gaps in the nation's southern air defense that military officials say may be all but impossible to plug. The March 20 incident has prompted an internal investigation by NORAD, the U.S.-Canadian command charged with protecting North American airspace, spokesman Maj. John Niemann said.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing to withdraw 10% to 12% of its military forces from South Korea, Japan and the Philippines over the next three years, according to a classified Pacific strategy plan being prepared by the Pentagon. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney will present the plan to South Korean defense officials today as he begins 10 days of high-level meetings with leaders of the East Asian allies.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush and Russian President Vladimir V. Putin ended their first summit with expressions of mutual respect Saturday, but they made no significant progress on such contentious issues as missile defense and NATO expansion. Bush said he offered Putin "logic" in urging Russia to agree to set aside the Antiballistic Missile Treaty--a move that would clear the way for full research and development of a U.S. missile shield.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A just-released poll has found that a majority of Americans supports proposals to build a missile defense system, even if the system is costly. As President Bush arrived in Europe to try to sell his missile defense proposal to allies, the Council on Foreign Relations released the survey, which showed 51% of Americans in favor of an anti-missile shield and 38% against.
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