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May 16, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A U.S. envoy explained the Bush administration's missile defense proposal to Chinese officials Tuesday, but failed to convince one of the system's strongest critics that the plan would enhance global security. James A. Kelly, assistant secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific affairs, spoke with vice foreign ministers Wang Yi and Li Zhaoxing, as well as China's top arms control official, Sha Zukang.
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NEWS
May 12, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian officials remained stolidly opposed after meeting here Friday with U.S. officials to the Bush administration's plan to abandon the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty in favor of a national missile defense shield. Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Yakovenko said Friday afternoon that the U.S delegation led by Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz failed to sway the Russians.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A diplomatic charm offensive by the Bush administration aimed at persuading skeptical NATO allies that they need a space-based missile shield has sold Europeans on the style of the U.S. pitch but not the substance of the project. The high-level delegation that swept across the continent this week also made headway in convincing security partners that a new concept of strategic deterrence is needed to ward off threats from strange new menaces labeled "nations of concern."
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the key panels reviewing military strategy for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld are shying away from the kind of radical reform of the Pentagon that observers had anticipated. The study groups, which were organized at the beginning of the year and have been reporting back in recent weeks, were widely expected to urge elimination of some major weapon programs to pay for a sweeping transformation of the military.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States, as part of its redesign of nuclear strategy, is considering reducing its nuclear arsenal to 1,500 warheads from the current 7,000, according to U.S. officials and arms control activists. Officials also say that the Bush administration, which begins formal missile defense consultations next week with key countries, hopes the discussions with European allies can produce a statement of "understanding," if not of support for its plans, when NATO foreign ministers meet in June.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that President Bush has officially declared his intention to build a large-scale missile defense system and scrap the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, his aides went to work Wednesday on the hard parts: winning the assent of skeptical European allies and a balky Russia. Selling the idea to an uncertain Congress. Finding money in the budget to pay for it. And, not least, developing missile defense systems that actually work.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush proposed Tuesday that the United States plunge into the new world of missile defense, abandoning both the treaty on which the global nuclear balance has rested for nearly 30 years and the underlying principles that have deterred nuclear war for more than five decades.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's push to build a robust missile defense system is a potent boost for Southern California, where dozens of companies are developing the key technologies for what could be one of the biggest military programs ever.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon advisors are trying to devise a preliminary missile defense system that could be assembled at maximum speed for deployment before the end of President Bush's term, according to sources familiar with the research. As Bush prepares for a speech today that will formally inaugurate his campaign to sell an antimissile system, Pentagon advisors and independent experts said the team advising Defense Secretary Donald H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Navy is asking to be exempted from a federal law that forbids the harassment or killing of whales as it begins exercises with a powerful new sonar designed to hunt for super-quiet submarines. The controversial sonar system, designed to blast swaths of ocean with low-frequency sound waves, will be the subject of protests today in Los Angeles and then a public hearing.
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