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NEWS
April 15, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without fanfare, the Pentagon is expected to soon abandon a concept that has guided and organized America's armed forces since the Cold War. The doctrine provides that the U.S. military should have enough troops and gear to whip two foes the size of Iraq or North Korea in quick succession. For much of the last decade, critics have complained that the concept was a shortsighted notion that kept America's generals busy thinking about how to refight the last war.
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NEWS
March 15, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, in words likely to alarm the Pentagon and its contractors, has suggested for the first time that the administration might have to do away with two of the three costly fighter plane programs currently being developed. Bush, whose aides are conducting a sweeping review of military needs, told reporters Tuesday: "I think it is realistic for me to say that, as president, I'm not sure we can afford all three."
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | HENRY CHU and MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In advance of its first direct contact with President Bush, the Chinese government Wednesday reiterated in sharp language its warning to the U.S. not to pursue plans for a national missile defense shield. Sha Zukang, China's top arms control negotiator, said such plans would touch off an arms race and upset the delicate global strategic balance that took years to achieve. "The development of NMD is tantamount to drinking poison to quench thirst," Sha told reporters.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tests of a proposed multibillion-dollar U.S. missile shield are too simplistic to make decisions about moving from research to deployment, the Pentagon's testing and evaluation office said. The test program is "not aggressive enough to match the pace of acquisition to support deployment, and the test content does not yet address important operational questions," Philip Coyle, the former director, wrote before resigning in January. President Bush wants to field a shield as soon as possible.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A satellite surveillance system that is a key element of a national missile shield probably won't meet its deployment schedule or cost targets and may have flaws that won't be apparent until its satellites are in orbit, according to a government research agency. The General Accounting Office said in a report issued this week that the Space-Based Infrared System Low is "at high risk of not delivering the system on time, at cost, or with expected performance."
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Russian Foreign Minister Igor S. Ivanov met here Saturday to try to close the growing chasm between the two former Cold War superpowers on issues ranging from the controversial U.S. national missile defense scheme to sanctions on Iraq. Powell described the first encounter between the Bush administration and the year-old government of President Vladimir V. Putin--held less than a week after the FBI uncovered a senior U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia test-launched two ballistic missiles Friday, sending a sharp warning to the Bush administration even as Moscow and Washington are warily feeling out their new relationship. The tests came amid bitter Russian opposition to U.S. plans for a national missile defense system and toughening rhetoric from both nations' top military and security officials.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday said he would ask Congress to spend an additional $2.6 billion to develop high-tech weapons for the nation's arsenal and called for cooperation among NATO allies to confront terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. In the post-Cold War era, Bush explained, the allied nations' adversaries have grown less predictable and more diverse. So new weaponry must be developed to counter the long-term dangers posed by terrorism and by nuclear, biological and chemical weapons.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told the top brass of the U.S. military Tuesday that President Bush has decided to stick with the Clinton administration's planned Pentagon budget of $310 billion for the next fiscal year, military officials said.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Russian Defense Minister Igor D. Sergeyev dismissed a proposed U.S. national missile defense as ineffective, saying that it could easily be defeated by the Soviet technologies developed in the 1980s to oppose President Reagan's "Star Wars" plan. "We had three mighty programs to asymmetrically counteract U.S. national missile defenses during Reagan's 'Star Wars,' " Sergeyev was quoted as saying by the Interfax news agency.
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