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NEWS
February 5, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Bush administration confronts world leaders over its controversial plan to build a national missile defense shield, it faces an equally daunting challenge at home: selling its blueprint to its own Republican allies. Although GOP leaders almost without exception firmly support the goal of missile defense, they are deeply split concerning the means. Some Republican lawmakers believe President Bush should build on the ground-based system that the Clinton administration began to develop.
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NEWS
February 4, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Bush administration's maiden voyage into the choppy waters of transatlantic relations, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld put European allies on notice Saturday that the Pentagon will press ahead with a national missile defense despite their objections. Rumsfeld and a chorus of U.S.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
The government secrets that former Pentagon official John M. Deutch included in personal journals stored on his unsecured home computer apparently did not fall into the wrong hands and damage national security, according to a Pentagon review made public Thursday. Since last February, the Pentagon has been assessing whether the secret information might have been compromised.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon commission on Wednesday called for creation of a Cabinet-level agency to assume responsibility for defending the nation against the increasing likelihood of terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. The bipartisan panel, led by former U.S. Sens. Warren B. Rudman (R-N.H.) and Gary Hart (D-Colo.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three years after Northrop Grumman Corp.'s last B-2 Stealth bomber rolled out of its Palmdale hanger, House defense leaders are urging President-elect George W. Bush to restart the production line to build as many as 40 more planes.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-level Pentagon study released Tuesday found that the bombing of the American destroyer Cole in October revealed dangerous shortcomings in U.S. military security and intelligence-gathering. The report, which did not attempt to assess leadership performance in the attack, found that U.S. planes and ships remain highly vulnerable to terrorist attack as they shuttle American forces through dangerous regions. And it said that U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect George W. Bush, who questioned the extent of the U.S. commitment in Europe during the campaign, sounded more cautious Monday about reducing the American military role there, according to a senior senator. The report by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
George W. Bush will be hit with a frostbitten economy when he's inaugurated in January. Business activity, already wavering, will be slowing to a crawl. Companies, instead of expanding, will be cutting costs, possibly laying off employees. The Federal Reserve will be thinking about lowering interest rates. And the new Bush administration will come into office pushing for tax cuts to revive the economy. Bush said Friday that he believes strongly in "the need to reduce marginal rates" of taxes.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | Associated Press
The Marine Corps' top officer said Thursday he expects the Defense Department to give the go-ahead soon for starting full-scale production of the MV-22 Osprey, a hybrid helicopter-airplane. The Marines are counting on the new aircraft to replace their Vietnam War-era fleet of transport helicopters. "I'm confident it should be approved, and I've seen nothing to lead me to believe that it won't," said Gen. James L. Jones, commandant of the Marine Corps, in an interview with Associated Press.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In recent weeks, while most investors seemed focused on election news or worries about technology stocks, shares of leading aerospace-defense companies hit new highs. The underlying reasons weren't hard to find. Defense budgets are slated to rise in the decade ahead as a changing world presents new challenges to U.S. military strategy. A major review of defense policies is a certainty in the next few years.
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