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United States Deportation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1993
A federal immigration judge took the witness stand in a Los Angeles federal court Friday to deny that he suppressed evidence related to the deportation of accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk. Bruce Einhorn, a former Justice Department lawyer who is now an immigration judge in Los Angeles, said he had not seen documents that Demjanjuk's family believes would have shown he was not "Ivan the Terrible," as prosecutors charged.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1993
A federal immigration judge took the witness stand in a Los Angeles federal court Friday to deny that he suppressed evidence related to the deportation of accused Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk. Bruce Einhorn, a former Justice Department lawyer who is now an immigration judge in Los Angeles, said he had not seen documents that Demjanjuk's family believes would have shown he was not "Ivan the Terrible," as prosecutors charged.
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NEWS
April 7, 1988
The Justice Department retreated from a stand that would have barred aliens facing deportation from having their asylum requests heard before an immigration judge. Rules proposed Aug. 28 would have required that all claims for asylum and withholding of deportation be heard by asylum officers of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Civil liberties groups say INS is unsympathetic to asylum-seekers, a charge the agency denies.
NEWS
February 21, 1985 | Associated Press
The leftist-dominated City Council has voted to give sanctuary to refugees from war-torn Central America and ordered police and other city officials not to assist federal immigration agents pursuing the aliens. "Let the federal government do its own job," said Mayor Eugene (Gus) Newport. The resolution was approved 8 to 1, with the only dissenting vote from Councilwoman Barbara Lashley, the lone remaining member of the moderate-conservative All Berkeley Coalition.
TRAVEL
October 24, 1999 | EDWARD WRIGHT
Latin America Mexico: Disease and civil unrest emerged as concerns in the wake of widespread flooding earlier this month that left more than 400 people dead and hundreds of thousands homeless across nine of Mexico's 31 states. With drinkable water in short supply, officials warned of possible outbreaks of cholera.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional Democrats and a sprinkling of Republicans denounced President Bush's renewal of trade benefits for China on Thursday and vowed to enact legislation reversing the decision. Within hours of Bush's announcement that he plans to extend China's most-favored-nation trade status for a year, measures to nullify the action were introduced in both Senate and House. Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) called the President's decision "inconsistent with American values . . .
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Senate today upheld President Bush's veto of a bill protecting Chinese students from deportation, handing him a narrow foreign policy victory in his first showdown this year with the Democratic Congress. The vote was 62 to 37, four short of the two-thirds margin needed to override a presidential veto. Just before the vote, Bush had renewed his promise that the students will be fully protected even without the legislation. "No student, as long as I'm President, will be sent back," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1988 | STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writer
A committee appointed by Mayor Tom Bradley called Wednesday for the passage of federal legislation that would protect Central Americans in the United States from deportation and urged expansion of education, health and legal services for hundreds of thousands of refugees living in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Mexican immigration authorities have agreed to a plan in which illegal immigrants who complete prison sentences in California will be deported to the interior of Mexico, rather than being released at the international border. The goal of the pilot program, according to INS Commissioner Gene McNary and Mexican immigration officials, is twofold: to deter so-called "criminal aliens" from re-entering the United States after deportation and to reduce crime in Mexican border communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Mexican immigration authorities have agreed to a plan in which illegal immigrants who complete prison sentences in California will be deported to the Mexican interior, rather than being released at the international border. The goal of the pilot program, according to INS Commissioner Gene McNary and Mexican immigration officials, is twofold: to deter so-called "criminal aliens" from re-entering the United States after deportation and to reduce crime in Mexican border communities.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the U.S. Border Patrol station here, just a few minutes drive from the busiest border crossing in the world, senior patrol agents Keith Centner and Hector Henao deal exclusively with criminals who have no legal right to be in the United States. Like the Border Patrol in general, Centner and Henao complain that they are understaffed, underfunded and overworked.
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