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United States Development And Redevelopment

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NEWS
November 12, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American skyscraper, which has reigned over urban skylines for more than a century, has fallen out of favor in recent years as a towering symbol of civic pride and corporate ego. Skyscraper construction has virtually dried up because of the overbuilding of the 1980s and the national recession in the early 1990s. And the future doesn't look very bright, either.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 2001 | SIOBHAN HUGHES and CARLOS TORRES, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Housing starts rose in December for the third month in four, confirming that home building is a bright spot in a slowing U.S. economy. An index of manufacturing for January dived, giving the Federal Reserve another reason to cut interest rates later this month. A rise in construction of single-family homes led to an overall 0.3% increase in housing starts last month to an annual rate of 1.575 million units, the most since May, the Commerce Department said.
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NEWS
March 9, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
An antiquated federal law designed to encourage mining in sparsely populated parts of the West instead is permitting developers to buy vast federal tracts for less than one one-thousandth of their fair market value, the General Accounting Office reported Wednesday. Entrepreneurs taking advantage of the law paid the government less than $4,000 for land estimated to be worth up to $48 million, GAO auditors revealed in a survey of just 20 of the hundreds of such sales concluded since 1970.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nationwide hotel building boom has raised concerns about a glut of guest rooms in certain markets and slower revenue growth in the years ahead. The surge of construction might be bad news for hotel owners but it could prove to be a bonus for guests. In suburban markets where building has been heavy, travelers could see a reduction in room rates as new hotels seek to establish themselves and fill their rooms.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual public-private partnership, Vice President Al Gore is expected to announce today a new agreement between the federal government, the nation's mayors and the National Assn. of Home Builders to construct 1 million homes in cities over the next 10 years. Under the agreement, the home builders will commit to construct 100,000 homes a year in urban centers, where homeownership rates lag behind the suburbs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could signal a widening fissure between conservationists and landowners over how to save rare wildlife, several national environmental groups have come out in support of a court challenge to a key piece of a much-hailed plan to balance growth and conservation in Southern California. Strongly supported by U.S.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2001 | SIOBHAN HUGHES and CARLOS TORRES, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Housing starts rose in December for the third month in four, confirming that home building is a bright spot in a slowing U.S. economy. An index of manufacturing for January dived, giving the Federal Reserve another reason to cut interest rates later this month. A rise in construction of single-family homes led to an overall 0.3% increase in housing starts last month to an annual rate of 1.575 million units, the most since May, the Commerce Department said.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton announced new rules Wednesday intended to limit the ability of property owners to short-circuit the federal application process for developing wetlands, even in cases where their projects would have only a minimal effect on the environment.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration signaled Thursday it is ready to move forward with a wide-ranging update of the Endangered Species Act, opting for a flexible approach that could allow controlled development of some habitats that currently are off-limits. The new effort, alike in theory to the community conservation program piloted in Orange County and other areas, is intended to steer away from the contentious pattern of the last 20 years.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After watching the flow of federal assistance shrink in the past decade, community development officials see signs of a potential turnaround in the proposed federal budget, which would direct investment into poor communities and extend the life of low-income housing tax breaks. But officials are quick to point out that the assistance--primarily in the form of tax breaks--still falls short of what is needed to rejuvenate depressed communities and satisfy the demand for affordable housing.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted with criticism from some scientists and environmental groups, the Clinton administration is promising to improve the program that attempts to strike a compromise between economic growth and the Endangered Species Act. That program to date has produced more than 240 conservation plans nationwide, from the Headwaters redwood forest in Northern California to Orange County's coastal hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could signal a widening fissure between conservationists and landowners over how to save rare wildlife, several national environmental groups have come out in support of a court challenge to a key piece of a much-hailed plan to balance growth and conservation in Southern California. Strongly supported by U.S.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual public-private partnership, Vice President Al Gore is expected to announce today a new agreement between the federal government, the nation's mayors and the National Assn. of Home Builders to construct 1 million homes in cities over the next 10 years. Under the agreement, the home builders will commit to construct 100,000 homes a year in urban centers, where homeownership rates lag behind the suburbs.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton announced new rules Wednesday intended to limit the ability of property owners to short-circuit the federal application process for developing wetlands, even in cases where their projects would have only a minimal effect on the environment.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration signaled Thursday it is ready to move forward with a wide-ranging update of the Endangered Species Act, opting for a flexible approach that could allow controlled development of some habitats that currently are off-limits. The new effort, alike in theory to the community conservation program piloted in Orange County and other areas, is intended to steer away from the contentious pattern of the last 20 years.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American skyscraper, which has reigned over urban skylines for more than a century, has fallen out of favor in recent years as a towering symbol of civic pride and corporate ego. Skyscraper construction has virtually dried up because of the overbuilding of the 1980s and the national recession in the early 1990s. And the future doesn't look very bright, either.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled developers, suffering the worst real estate slump in years and increasingly under fire from vocal citizens groups, are gathering in Southern California this week to discuss ways to survive the troubled times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to reroute the environmental policies of the next administration, a leading conservationist group Tuesday ranked Yosemite National Park and the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area among the 10 most endangered parks in the country. The Wilderness Society called on national leaders to overhaul their priorities for land-use and to reverse what the society sees as an eight-year slide of neglect and abuse under the Reagan Administration.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision widely anticipated both by property rights advocates and environmentalists, the Supreme Court on Monday made it easier for property owners to win compensation when government forbids them to develop their land. Officials can prevent development without compensation if the land use would be a "nuisance" and cause clear harm to others, the court said, but they cannot refuse compensation simply because banning the development would benefit the public.
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