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United States Diplomatic Recognition

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NEWS
March 10, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is moving toward recognizing the independence of the republics that once made up Yugoslavia, ending a rift with its major European allies over the issue, American officials said Monday. The shift, which could come as early as this week, would bring the United States into line with Germany and the rest of the European Community, which have taken the diplomatic lead in dealing with the violent breakup of the Yugoslav federation. Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
March 10, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is moving toward recognizing the independence of the republics that once made up Yugoslavia, ending a rift with its major European allies over the issue, American officials said Monday. The shift, which could come as early as this week, would bring the United States into line with Germany and the rest of the European Community, which have taken the diplomatic lead in dealing with the violent breakup of the Yugoslav federation. Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
June 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
About 1,000 demonstrators in West Los Angeles called on the Bush Administration on Saturday to recognize the republics of Croatia and Slovenia as independent from Yugoslavia. Croatian- and Slovenian-Americans waved signs reading, "Recognize Slovenia," "America Please Help" and "God Bless Croatia" in front of the Federal Building. Scores of large blue, white and red Croatian flags with the distinctive checkered shield fluttered in the light breeze.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush plans to announce Thursday that the United States will recognize the independence of all 12 former Soviet republics and immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with six of them, Administration officials said Monday.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush plans to announce Thursday that the United States will recognize the independence of all 12 former Soviet republics and immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with six of them, Administration officials said Monday.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | H.G. REZA and TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Little Saigon, where political emotions run especially deep, the news Tuesday that the United States might establish full diplomatic relations with Vietnam evoked both bitterness and optimism. Here, in the largest Vietnamese community outside of the native land, hard-liners who generally view the world as either communist or non-communist reacted with contempt to Secretary of State Warren Christopher's recommendation that President Clinton establish ties to Hanoi.
NEWS
April 2, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
In the early years of the 12th Century, a holy man named Gerard founded a hospital in Jerusalem to care for Christian pilgrims felled by the rigors of their journey. Next week, Gerard's knightly heirs gather here, in solemn and secret conclave, to elect a blueblood sovereign for history's oldest chivalric order and the world's smallest state. As in Gerard's time, their principal concern is in caring for "our lords, the sick."
NATIONAL
November 25, 2006 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Gates, President Bush's nominee to lead the Pentagon, advocated a bombing campaign against Nicaragua in 1984 in order to "bring down" the leftist government, according to a declassified memo released by a nonprofit research group. The memo from Gates to his then-boss, CIA Director William J. Casey, was among a selection of declassified documents from the 1980s Iran-Contra scandal posted Friday on the website of the National Security Archive, www.gwu.edu/nsarchiv/.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The evening program of revolutionary songs in this historic Communist stronghold was interrupted by a public announcement. "The devil's wind has come to our province," a voice boomed over the town's central loudspeakers. "Strive to eliminate corruption. Obey the spirit of the central government. Don't dine out on official money."
BUSINESS
December 9, 1985 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent
Ever since the Russian Revolution, American business has borne an in-and-out role in the Soviet economy. Lenin opened the door, Stalin shut it. From Khrushchev to Gorbachev the door has swung but never easily nor widely. This week, nearly 300 of America's corporate executives have assembled in Moscow for still another nudge. The forum is the annual meeting of the U.S.-U.S.S.R.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
About 1,000 demonstrators in West Los Angeles called on the Bush Administration on Saturday to recognize the republics of Croatia and Slovenia as independent from Yugoslavia. Croatian- and Slovenian-Americans waved signs reading, "Recognize Slovenia," "America Please Help" and "God Bless Croatia" in front of the Federal Building. Scores of large blue, white and red Croatian flags with the distinctive checkered shield fluttered in the light breeze.
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
He represented a country that does not officially exist. He was not on the diplomatic lists and he was not permitted to set foot inside the White House or the State Department. Yet when Frederick F. Chien left here to return to Taiwan last month after serving for five years as its unofficial ambassador to the United States, his goodby party was nearly as large and lavish as an inaugural ball.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | MARK ARAX, Times Staff Writer
Across the entire stretch of the San Gabriel Valley, from Monterey Park in the west to Diamond Bar in the east, unprecedented numbers of Asian newcomers are dramatically changing life in the suburbs. In one of the most sweeping demographic and social transitions ever experienced by a suburban region, the San Gabriel Valley has emerged as an improbable center of Chinese and other Asian immigration in this country.
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