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United States Diplomatic Recognition Lithuania

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NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
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NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
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NEWS
August 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, the United States has championed the cause of Baltic independence, steadfastly refusing to acknowledge the annexation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania by the Soviet Union and granting their representatives the sort of diplomatic presence they were denied by much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday--before the champagne, before the polka bands, before the folk dancing and speeches and toasts--Danute Mazeika went to a cemetery in East Los Angeles with an armful of chrysanthemums and two long-awaited words. "You won," the Lithuanian-American activist said silently to her grandfather's grave.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is preparing for a particularly awkward turn in a 50-year diplomatic minuet if Lithuania, as expected, declares itself independent of the Soviet Union this weekend, U.S. and Lithuanian officials acknowledged Thursday. The United States has never recognized the incorporation of Lithuania and its two Baltic neighbors, Estonia and Latvia, into the Soviet Union in the opening days of World War II.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with Lithuania's continuing defiance, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered its citizens Wednesday to surrender all weapons and imposed tough visa controls and border checks by the KGB to bring the rebel Baltic land back into the Soviet fold.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday--before the champagne, before the polka bands, before the folk dancing and speeches and toasts--Danute Mazeika went to a cemetery in East Los Angeles with an armful of chrysanthemums and two long-awaited words. "You won," the Lithuanian-American activist said silently to her grandfather's grave.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cautiously encouraged by signs of a break in the Lithuanian impasse, the Bush Administration appeared Wednesday to endorse the Soviet call for a referendum among Lithuanians to decide whether the Baltic state should become independent of the Soviet Union. Secretary of State James A. Baker III also seemed upbeat about the prospects for setting specific dates for the next U.S.-Soviet summit, despite the Lithuanian crisis.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration pledged Tuesday to help the newly recognized Baltic republics cope with some of the problems that will accompany their independence, but officials warned that large-scale U.S. economic aid is unlikely. "We'll want to be able to work out what's the most appropriate way of working directly with the Baltic states to support their independence and support them along the path that they have chosen," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday that the march toward independence by Soviet republics has become "inexorable" but insisted that it is not yet time for the United States to join the rush toward formal recognition of the break-away Baltic states. The cautious stance reflects what Bush described as his concern that too "precipitous" a move by the United States could nudge a highly fluid Soviet Union further toward dissolution and disorder.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | LANIE JONES and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hours after President Bush opened full diplomatic relations with Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, a Mission Viejo couple and their three small children visited Calvary Cemetery in East Los Angeles to offer prayers of thanks to the children's great-grandparents--Lithuanian freedom fighters who died without seeing their country liberated.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush extended U.S. diplomatic recognition Monday to the Baltic republics of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, marking the first official American sanction of a step toward the breakup of the Soviet Union. But Bush cautioned that the United States would consider similar declarations by the other secessionist Soviet republics only on a "case by case basis."
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major Western allies are considering a plan to require Moscow and breakaway Soviet republics to make deep cuts in their nuclear forces as a condition of future economic assistance, according to Administration officials Saturday. The new push to link arms control and aid reflects an effort to seize what officials believe is a crucial opportunity to secure stability from the tumult surrounding the breakup of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Monday that the march toward independence by Soviet republics has become "inexorable" but insisted that it is not yet time for the United States to join the rush toward formal recognition of the break-away Baltic states. The cautious stance reflects what Bush described as his concern that too "precipitous" a move by the United States could nudge a highly fluid Soviet Union further toward dissolution and disorder.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, the United States has championed the cause of Baltic independence, steadfastly refusing to acknowledge the annexation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania by the Soviet Union and granting their representatives the sort of diplomatic presence they were denied by much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major Western allies are considering a plan to require Moscow and breakaway Soviet republics to make deep cuts in their nuclear forces as a condition of future economic assistance, according to Administration officials Saturday. The new push to link arms control and aid reflects an effort to seize what officials believe is a crucial opportunity to secure stability from the tumult surrounding the breakup of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | LANIE JONES and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hours after President Bush opened full diplomatic relations with Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, a Mission Viejo couple and their three small children visited Calvary Cemetery in East Los Angeles to offer prayers of thanks to the children's great-grandparents--Lithuanian freedom fighters who died without seeing their country liberated.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cautiously encouraged by signs of a break in the Lithuanian impasse, the Bush Administration appeared Wednesday to endorse the Soviet call for a referendum among Lithuanians to decide whether the Baltic state should become independent of the Soviet Union. Secretary of State James A. Baker III also seemed upbeat about the prospects for setting specific dates for the next U.S.-Soviet summit, despite the Lithuanian crisis.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with Lithuania's continuing defiance, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered its citizens Wednesday to surrender all weapons and imposed tough visa controls and border checks by the KGB to bring the rebel Baltic land back into the Soviet fold.
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