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United States Diplomatic Recognition Taiwan

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NEWS
September 5, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Over the last six years, the Heritage Foundation, the conservative Washington think tank with close ties to the Reagan Administration, has received $3 million from Taiwan, an amount larger than it gets from any other nation outside the United States. "They give to us because they share our viewpoint," explained Heritage Foundation President Edwin J. Feulner Jr., whose organization has issued a series of studies and analyses supporting policies favorable to Taiwan.
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NEWS
September 5, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Over the last six years, the Heritage Foundation, the conservative Washington think tank with close ties to the Reagan Administration, has received $3 million from Taiwan, an amount larger than it gets from any other nation outside the United States. "They give to us because they share our viewpoint," explained Heritage Foundation President Edwin J. Feulner Jr., whose organization has issued a series of studies and analyses supporting policies favorable to Taiwan.
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NEWS
September 5, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
He represented a country that does not officially exist. He was not on the diplomatic lists and he was not permitted to set foot inside the White House or the State Department. Yet when Frederick F. Chien left here to return to Taiwan last month after serving for five years as its unofficial ambassador to the United States, his goodby party was nearly as large and lavish as an inaugural ball.
NEWS
September 5, 1988 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
He represented a country that does not officially exist. He was not on the diplomatic lists and he was not permitted to set foot inside the White House or the State Department. Yet when Frederick F. Chien left here to return to Taiwan last month after serving for five years as its unofficial ambassador to the United States, his goodby party was nearly as large and lavish as an inaugural ball.
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