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United States Diplomatic Recognition Vietnam

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NEWS
July 12, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting a formal end to the only war the United States ever lost, President Clinton extended diplomatic recognition Tuesday to the Communist government of Vietnam and said he hopes the move will help its people achieve the freedom for which American troops once fought. In a somber White House ceremony, Clinton paid tribute to the U.S.
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NEWS
January 31, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-two years after the last U.S. troops left Saigon, the United States and Vietnam are about to take the final steps to normalize relations and officially begin a new era of diplomatic and economic cooperation. In the next few months, the two countries are to exchange ambassadors. Besides the embassies already operating in Washington and Hanoi, they will open consulates--the Americans in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) and the Vietnamese in San Francisco.
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NEWS
July 13, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even while offering a conciliatory message to overseas Vietnamese, such as those in Orange County, Vietnam served notice Wednesday that it will make no concessions on demands for more democracy or the question of political prisoners despite the U.S. decision to normalize diplomatic relations. Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet said, however, that he believes normalization will allow expatriates to get closer to their homeland.
NEWS
August 5, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher arrived in Hanoi today on a mission aimed at consummating President Clinton's recent decision to establish diplomatic relations with Vietnam. Stepping off the plane on a cloudy, humid day at Noi Bai Airport, once the target of American bombing missions, Christopher became the first American secretary of state ever to visit Hanoi.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | Times Wire Services
U.S. and Vietnamese negotiators have agreed in principle on the opening of liaison offices and on U.S. war claims against Vietnam, the Hanoi government said Wednesday. A statement issued by the Foreign Ministry said two days of talks, critical steps in establishing diplomatic relations, ended "with a very positive result." The statement said more meetings will be held later to finalize the agreements. The negotiations--together with what the U.S.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam urged the United States on Saturday to stop linking normalization of diplomatic ties to a resolution of the fate of American servicemen missing from the Vietnam War. The Foreign Ministry said Vietnam is doing its best to cooperate with Washington to find clues to or remains of Americans who never made it home from the war.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the rival factions in Cambodia are moving toward a peace settlement, Vietnam's ambassador to the United Nations says the United States should begin to normalize relations with his country. "We are prepared to have relations as soon as possible--tomorrow, the day after tomorrow," Trinh Xuan Lang said in an interview at Vietnam's mission to the United Nations. ". . . We are not begging. If the United States is not ready, we are prepared to wait. But I think we should not miss this chance."
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the highest-level U.S.-Hanoi contact since the Vietnam War ended 15 years ago, Secretary of State James A. Baker III told Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach on Saturday that Washington will consider normal diplomatic relations as soon as peace is restored in neighboring Cambodia and Hanoi accounts for missing American servicemen.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time, the Bush Administration is holding out the prospect that it may begin to allow American organizations to travel and do business in Vietnam. In testimony to members of Congress on Wednesday, Assistant Secretary of State Richard H. Solomon described a detailed "road map" for normalization of U.S.-Vietnamese ties--contingent upon Vietnam's help in bringing about a peace settlement in Cambodia.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department's highest-ranking Asia envoy said Washington will not forge diplomatic ties with Vietnam until a Cambodian peace accord is signed and the issue of missing service personnel is resolved. Assistant Secretary of State Richard H. Solomon is in Bangkok for talks with Vietnamese Deputy Foreign Minister Le Mai, whose country continues to be the target of a U.S. trade embargo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly one in five Vietnamese Americans in Orange County have traveled to Vietnam since the country opened its doors to visitors almost 10 years ago, an indication of the bonds many have with the homeland they fled, according to a Cal State Fullerton survey released Thursday.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chau Tue Carey looks around apprehensively at the nearly empty courtyard behind the Orange County Civic Center. It is time for her hastily arranged demonstration against President Clinton's decision to normalize relations with Vietnam. Only one man is present. It's still early, Carey is saying brightly. People don't know how to get there. They have to work. She runs out of excuses and sighs.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chau Tue Carey looks around anxiously at the relatively empty courtyard behind the Civic Center. It is time for her hastily arranged demonstration against President Clinton's decision to normalize relations with Vietnam. Only one man is present. It's still early, Carey is saying brightly. People don't know how to get there. They have to work. She runs out of excuses and sighs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1995 | PHUONG NGUYEN
A trembling and teary Quan Van Nguyen maintained a strong salute Thursday morning before the memorial in Santa Ana that honors local servicemen killed in the Vietnam War. Speaking in his native tongue, the 64-year-old self-employed tailor shouted thanks to those who died fighting for Vietnam's freedom and democracy and condemned President Clinton for betraying them by normalizing relations this week with America's former adversary.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defending President Clinton's decision to establish normal relations with Vietnam, a Clinton Administration official conceded before a hostile House committee Wednesday that the Hanoi government had secretly withheld the bodies of U.S. service personnel but ceased the practice at least five years ago. Responding to charges by California Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) that a Vietnamese warehouse contains the remains of as many as 400 U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam served notice Wednesday that, despite the U.S. decision to normalize diplomatic relations, it will make no concessions on demands for more democracy or the question of political prisoners. Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet went on national television early Wednesday to express his gratitude for President Clinton's announcement that Washington would establish full relations with Hanoi after 41 years. Kiet said the decision contributes to the peace and stability of Southeast Asia.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | THUAN LE and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's Vietnamese community and local congressmen expressed cautious optimism Wednesday over news that the United States is ready to normalize relations with Vietnam, yet opposes any deal until the Communist regime restores basic human rights to its people. But a Santa Ana woman who believes that her husband is still being held as a prisoner of war was outraged at the development.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even while offering a conciliatory message to overseas Vietnamese, such as those in Orange County, Vietnam served notice Wednesday that it will make no concessions on demands for more democracy or the question of political prisoners despite the U.S. decision to normalize diplomatic relations. Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet said, however, that he believes normalization will allow expatriates to get closer to their homeland.
NEWS
July 12, 1995
"It's a little too soon. There's still a lot of broken hearts out there. For those of us who are in this museum today, there's a lot of bitterness toward a man who wasn't even there. What's his purpose? He's only a few blocks from that wall--why doesn't he go look?" Wayne Anthony, 49, U.S. Army veteran who spent 1967-68 in Cu Chi. * "I am very, very happy. We need to move on. It has been 20 years and our family in Vietnam needs our help. My son died fighting for his country.
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