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NEWS
January 5, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preparing to leave office after a period of historic change in the American military, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney predicted Monday that his successor will become more conservative as he steps into his new role and cautioned him not to base "long-term national security policy on the assumption that all is well in Moscow." In a wide-ranging farewell interview 17 days before leaving office, Cheney said that his successor, Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.
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NEWS
January 6, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Few presidents have faced such a radical shift in circumstances so soon after taking office as George W. Bush. Elected while the nation was still luxuriating in peace and prosperity, Bush has been forced to grapple with recession and a devastating foreign attack on the American mainland. As a candidate, Bush focused on domestic issues--cutting taxes, reforming education, bolstering religious charities.
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NEWS
November 10, 2001 | DANA CALVO and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The people who head Hollywood's media conglomerates are not accustomed to taking meetings without knowing the agenda. But that's exactly what they will do Sunday as about 40 of them sit down in Beverly Hills for brunch with Karl Rove, President Bush's senior advisor. In broad strokes, the White House has said it wants the involvement of the entertainment industry in the campaign against terrorism. There have been hints of having Hollywood create public service announcements.
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's determination to maintain harmonious relations with Democrats while waging war on terrorism may sit well with the public, but the love fest is beginning to unnerve Republicans. With the beginning of a key election year just weeks away, many Republicans are pressuring the White House and Bush himself to focus anew on his domestic goals--and promote them far more vigorously than he has so far. Since Sept.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
On a Sunday afternoon 10 days before President Clinton's State of the Union address, Clinton and Vice President Al Gore met in the White House with about a dozen leaders of major environmental groups. A week later, Gore met with the leaders again to brief them about the contents of Clinton's economic package. It contained 19 of 30 measures recommended by the Sierra Club, one of the groups in the meetings.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
White House Backs Inflation Fight: The Clinton Administration supports the Federal Reserve Board's war on inflation, Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said, adding that he does not think inflation is likely to accelerate out of control. His comments came as the Labor Department was preparing to report today on inflation in prices of goods at the wholesale level; the department is to issue retail price inflation figures Friday morning.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | From Associated Press
Here are excerpts from President Clinton's remarks on affirmative action: It is in a way ironic that this issue should be divisive today because affirmative action began 25 years ago . . . by a Republican President with bipartisan support; it began simply as a means to an end of enduring national purpose: equal opportunity for all Americans. . . . Our search to find ways to move more quickly to equal opportunity led to the development of what we now call affirmative action.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Lt. Jeannie Flynn had never been one to buck the system. Even though she had graduated first in her pilot training class early last year, she knew the Air Force would turn down her request to fly its top fighter plane. Women were, after all, prohibited from serving in combat. When the expected denial came, Flynn quietly switched to Plan B and enrolled in a flight instructor course in California, hoping that some day the clouds would lift over her primary target.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI, in the wake of the disintegration of the Soviet Union, is studying a major reordering of its resources, Atty. Gen. William P. Barr said in an interview Friday. Although Barr declined to discuss details of the study, which he had requested, it presumably will raise the possibility of shifting some of the large number of agents now doing foreign counterintelligence work to fighting domestic crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993 | AMEI WALLACH, Amei Wallach is the art critic for New York Newsday
Back when he was still "at that vulnerable age when I thought dance wasn't for real men," Robert Peck remembers, his parents prodded him into attending a ballet performance in Washington. And there in the audience was President John F. Kennedy, not in the least perturbed, it seemed, at this public assault on his manhood. Peck, a member of Bill Clinton's arts and humanities transition team, traces his love of ballet back to that shameless display of arts enthusiasm on the part of a U.S.
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | DANA CALVO and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The people who head Hollywood's media conglomerates are not accustomed to taking meetings without knowing the agenda. But that's exactly what they will do Sunday as about 40 of them sit down in Beverly Hills for brunch with Karl Rove, President Bush's senior advisor. In broad strokes, the White House has said it wants the involvement of the entertainment industry in the campaign against terrorism. There have been hints of having Hollywood create public service announcements.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush administration on Thursday launched a sweeping "wartime reorganization" aimed at making counter-terrorism the dominant priority of federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies--even at the expense of other traditional operations.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A top aide to President Bush said Sunday that the president would not support federal funding to increase the number of embryonic stem cell lines available for study even if scientists concluded that the existing supply was insufficient for research. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson said that neither unexpected scientific breakthroughs nor unanticipated research problems would cause Bush to reconsider the strict limits on stem cell research funding he set last week.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plunging the wireless industry into further turmoil, a top federal regulator is seeking to postpone the selection of spectrum for high-speed mobile Internet access and other advanced services. The Federal Communications Commission had been expected to recommend next month which of two valuable blocks of airwaves would be auctioned to the industry for so-called 3G, or third-generation, wireless.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Private energy companies could own rights to a key piece of California's electrical transmission grid, thereby gaining influence over the flow of electricity and its price, under a plan launched Wednesday by the federal government. At the direction of President Bush, a federal power agency Wednesday invited "outside parties" to help pay for the expansion of Path 15, an 85-mile stretch of high-voltage wires in the Central Valley that constrains the flow of power.
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
The secretive policy reviews that Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld undertook three months ago to begin modernizing the military are likely to result in less radical change than commonly believed, his spokesman said Tuesday. "I think there was a widespread perception that there would be many more near-term announcements of dramatic change than what we're actually going to see," Rear Adm. Craig Quigley said. In fact, there have been no dramatic changes yet.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Bill Clinton's immediate economic priorities were ever in doubt, they are no longer: for the short term, he made clear Thursday, stimulating growth and creating jobs will take precedence over deficit reduction. He also provided the clearest answer yet to the second big question about his economic strategy: how he would pursue his stimulus priorities without throwing nervous financial markets into a panic.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton launched a celebrity-packed three-day summit on volunteerism Sunday by announcing some small federal initiatives and emphasizing that in a time of tight budgets, the primary responsibility for solving the problems plaguing the nation's youth lay within each American and not with big government.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal advisory panel Thursday urged the Bush administration to identify the five most promising areas to drill for natural gas in coastal waters off California and other states, which have been off limits to drilling for nearly 20 years. Citing the nation's unmet energy needs, the advisory group to Interior Secretary Gale A.
NEWS
May 21, 2001
It's far too early to say whether the plan that President Bush released last week will provide the path out of the energy crunch. But it unquestionably provides a road map for the way this White House approaches a complex political problem. It helps explain why Bush is proving a more formidable adversary than many Democrats had expected--and why his reach may still exceed his grasp.
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