Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Drugs
IN THE NEWS

United States Drugs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 18, 1989
U.S. marijuana growers, thwarting government efforts to destroy their crop, expanded their production by 38% last year and are now virtually tied with Mexican growers as the world's second-largest producers of the drug behind Colombia, according to government estimates. At the same time, marijuana prices have reached their highest levels ever--as much as $300 an ounce in some instances--in part because of increased cultivation of sinsemilla, a seedless strain of the crop that is far more potent than traditional "commercial grade" marijuana, according to a report by the National Narcotics Intelligence Consumers Committee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 17, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The leader of the Gulf cartel, one of Mexico's oldest drug-running organizations, was captured by the Mexican army Saturday, officials said, dealing a new blow to a decades-old enterprise whose power has waned in recent years with the rise of other criminal groups. Mario Armando Ramirez Treviño, 51, who is wanted in the United States, was arrested Saturday morning, according to a government statement. Mexican news organizations reported that he was detained in Rio Bravo, Tamaulipas, near the Texas border.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted overwhelmingly Friday for a popular election-year plan to step up the war on drugs by giving the armed forces a bigger role in the surveillance and arrest of drug smugglers crossing the nation's southern borders. As a result of the 83-6 vote, it is now certain that the $299.5-billion defense spending bill that goes to President Reagan later this year will require increased military involvement in combatting illegal drugs.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
U.S. marijuana growers, thwarting government efforts to destroy their crop, expanded their production by 38% last year and are now virtually tied with Mexican growers as the world's second-largest producers of the drug behind Colombia, according to government estimates. At the same time, marijuana prices have reached their highest levels ever--as much as $300 an ounce in some instances--in part because of increased cultivation of sinsemilla, a seedless strain of the crop that is far more potent than traditional "commercial grade" marijuana, according to a report by the National Narcotics Intelligence Consumers Committee.
WORLD
August 17, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The leader of the Gulf cartel, one of Mexico's oldest drug-running organizations, was captured by the Mexican army Saturday, officials said, dealing a new blow to a decades-old enterprise whose power has waned in recent years with the rise of other criminal groups. Mario Armando Ramirez Treviño, 51, who is wanted in the United States, was arrested Saturday morning, according to a government statement. Mexican news organizations reported that he was detained in Rio Bravo, Tamaulipas, near the Texas border.
OPINION
June 3, 1990
Regarding Bush's China policy: Whatever happened to "Let me walk a mile in my neighbors moccasins. . . ." Multiply the ills of the United States--poverty, drugs, crime, health care, burdened legal system--by four and place them in an environment of dwindling resources. The question is not what's good for America's future, but what will work for a country with 1 billion people and limited resources. K.R. JEWETT Marina del Rey
NATIONAL
December 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
Ten states said Thursday they are exploring ways to buy cheap prescription drugs from Canada and make them widely available to Americans, even though importing the medicines is illegal. Representatives from the states met with five Canadian drug companies at an Atlanta hotel Thursday to hear their pitch on how to sell the drugs safely and within the law. The meeting comes two days after the city of Boston and the state of New Hampshire announced their intention to purchase drugs from Canada.
WORLD
October 24, 2004 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
As a child in his Mennonite settlement in northern Mexico, Jacobo attended a one-room school, where he did his lessons in chalk on a small black slate, and barely learned to read and write. As a teenager, he was forbidden from listening to music, playing sports, dancing, even yelling, by Mennonite authorities intent on protecting their people from the world. Instead, those good intentions left Jacobo vulnerable -- unprotected -- when the real world beckoned.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | From Associated Press
International drug trafficker Carlos Lehder testified Thursday that U.S. authorities offered him a "green light" to smuggle cocaine into the United States if he let them use his island in the Bahamas to run guns to the Nicaraguan Contras. Lehder, a witness in the federal trial of former Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, said that the U.S. vice consul in Cali, Colombia, made the offer in 1982. Accompanying the official was a man presented as his superior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1988 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
While it has become traditional for opposition leaders from nearly every country in the world to visit the United States to explain their positions and enhance their stature, Mexicans have generally frowned on the practice. It has been seen as either a pretense to covera weak domestic position or a form of inviting U.S. meddling in Mexican affairs. Only a Mexican leader with widespread popular support and impeccable nationalist credentials could break this taboo.
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted overwhelmingly Friday for a popular election-year plan to step up the war on drugs by giving the armed forces a bigger role in the surveillance and arrest of drug smugglers crossing the nation's southern borders. As a result of the 83-6 vote, it is now certain that the $299.5-billion defense spending bill that goes to President Reagan later this year will require increased military involvement in combatting illegal drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tommaso Buscetta, a top Mafia turncoat who helped convict hundreds of mobsters in Italy and testified in the "pizza connection" trial in the United States, has died at age 71. Buscetta died of cancer Sunday in the United States, his lawyer, Luigi Ligotti, said Tuesday. Ligotti said he did not know where his client died because Buscetta was in the witness protection program. Although Buscetta married three times and had several children, there was no immediate information on survivors.
NEWS
February 29, 1988 | JAMES MARNELL
--When South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan was succeeded last week by Roh Tae Woo, there was probably no one in the country happier than Park Yong Shik, once a popular television actor. In fact, he doffed his toupee--as a fitting gesture of his unbounded delight. Park, 44, had been forced to wear the hairpiece because he resembled the balding 57-year-old Chun. In 1981, at the start of Chun's reign, Park was banned from appearing on state-run television, although nobody told him why.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|