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NEWS
April 19, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
In a speech that provoked angry rebuttals from administrators and some students, U.S. Secretary of Education William J. Bennett charged Monday that Stanford University's recent change in Western Culture studies was "an unfortunate capitulation to a campaign of pressure politics and intimidation." Bennett told a campus audience that protests by minority students scared the university into dropping a mandatory reading list of 15 classics from the course required for all freshmen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2001 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the distractions of the state's energy crisis and the nation's war on terrorism, 2001 was a big year for education reform, both in Congress and in California classrooms. Accomplishments ranged from boosting students' basic skills in city schools to setting a national agenda in a sweeping federal education bill passed at year's end. But some divisive issues, such as school vouchers, remain unresolved.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After decades in which many of the best science and math classes were offered in elite private and suburban schools and catered only to highly motivated children with extraordinary IQs, a new trend is emerging. In a growing number of schools, teachers are experimenting with new approaches and materials, turning average and even below-average students into budding young scientists and mathematicians.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
If history is any guide, the Bush administration will face stiff resistance as it pushes states to carry out the ambitious education reforms passed by Congress this week. The bill calls for annual math and reading testing for all third- through eighth-graders, but its first test will be a political one, said Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez). "You need to be a tough cop on the beat to enforce what Congress says it wants states to do," Miller said Friday.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and JOEL SAPPELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1988 | Associated Press
American high school students have an alarming deficiency of economic knowledge, according to a survey that revealed two-thirds didn't understand profits and more than half couldn't supply a definition for demand. Economic education is "not in the kind of shape we want it to be," former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Paul A. Volcker said Wednesday at a news conference sponsored by the Joint Council on Economic Education, a nonprofit coalition that underwrote the survey.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Harlem is inner-city America: where crack sells in rubble-caked lots, guns sound in the night, public housing darkens under graffiti, abandoned tenements rot on decrepit streets and tattered men just hang around. "You don't walk around here at night," said Allister Whitman, who supervises the speech programs in East Harlem's public schools. "If you walk around 109th Street," said Leslie Moore, director of a junior high school on that street, "you will see lines forming for crack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As a veteran of the kindergarten trenches, teacher Liz Lozano knows how tough it can be to regiment a classroom of antsy kids, particularly very young boys. So when it came time to put her own two sons in a Los Angeles school, she didn't hesitate--to hold them back a year, that is. "We wanted [them] to develop creativity and thinking skills before starting because kindergarten is so academic now," she said.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One recent morning, Ann Viar spotted Lamar Alexander strolling down her street, knocking on doors. She turned the radio up loud and retreated to her backyard. It wasn't so much that Viar is a Democrat and Alexander, the former governor of Tennessee, aspires to the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress is about to draw the curtain on one of Washington's longest-running disputes: how to reshape the federal role in education to improve foundering public schools. House and Senate negotiators are expected today to approve a proposal to settle the argument, enabling nearly every player in the debate to take a bow.
NEWS
December 10, 2001 | Reuters
In one of the few domestic policy priorities not eclipsed by the Sept. 11 attacks, U.S. congressional negotiators expected to wrap up work Tuesday on the most sweeping educational reform bill since the 1960s. The bipartisan effort, which addresses accountability for failing schools, student testing programs, bilingual education, literacy initiatives and new programs to improve teacher quality, was one of President Bush's top priorities in his first year in office.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The next time you visit your child's teachers, you might ask them to clarify a few things. For starters, is little Junior LEP or FEP? Does his school provide a FIP and a FAPE? Or does it offer a SLAPAT, because you may want one of those. Then there's the question of whether he is socially promoting under a rubric for assessing English language development. If he isn't, you might want to check for phonemic sequencing errors or phonological process delays.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | TYNISA E. TRAPPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The current shortage of teachers in the nation's classrooms will worsen in the coming decade--and will hit California particularly hard--a panel of educators said Tuesday. By 2011, the shortfall nationwide is expected to reach 2 million teachers, with nearly 300,000 positions in California's public schools going unfilled, said members of the panel, which included school administrators, representatives of teachers' groups and policymakers.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The back-patting is over. Now the details await. The Senate's overwhelming passage this week of a landmark education bill raised nearly as many questions as it answered. The legislation designed to close the achievement gap between haves and have-nots in the nation's public schools came with a gap of its own: money. At an estimated annual cost of more than $33 billion, the programs authorized by Thursday's 91-8 vote tally far more than the $19.1 billion requested by President Bush.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of the cornerstones of President Bush's campaign: vouchers for low-income students caught in failing schools. But on Tuesday--to no one's surprise--the Senate defeated, on a 58-41 vote, a last, modest effort by conservative Republicans to include a voucher provision in education reform legislation sought by Bush. The amendment, offered by Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), would have provided $50 million for a pilot voucher program limited to 10 school districts in three states.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Ask Norma V. Cantu what the major obstacles are to Latinos' success in school and she shoots back "language and money." The answer of Cantu, director of educational programs for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is a succinct description of her organization's strategy in the battle to improve the dismal educational statistics for one of the nation's largest and fastest-growing minority groups.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a high school near the Mexican border Friday, President Clinton aimed a message directly at Latinos struggling to move forward in the global economy: Quitting school amounts to "Russian roulette." Specifically, the tradition of dropping out of high school to earn money for a family's upkeep no longer makes sense in a world where knowledge adds up to market value, the president told the approving South Texas crowd.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House overwhelmingly approved a sweeping educational reform measure Wednesday that requires annual testing of students and holds school districts accountable for academic performance, a proposal that was a cornerstone issue of President Bush's election campaign. The measure would require annual reading and mathematics testing in grades three through eight.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, lawmakers have wrestled with one of the toughest questions in their effort to produce an education reform bill: how to define a failing school. On Thursday, Senate negotiators from both major parties announced their answer as they unveiled a new version of the education bill and began a long-awaited floor debate on one of President Bush's priorities.
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