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United States Education Federal Aid

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NEWS
February 1, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To make up an estimated $1.3-billion shortage for a popular college tuition grant program, the Bush administration is proposing to cut funding for hundreds of local education and community projects that lawmakers singled out for federal aid late last year.
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NEWS
February 1, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To make up an estimated $1.3-billion shortage for a popular college tuition grant program, the Bush administration is proposing to cut funding for hundreds of local education and community projects that lawmakers singled out for federal aid late last year.
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NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Decrying racial disparities in the United States, President Clinton on Saturday announced $223 million in grants to help provide education and job training to up to 44,000 poor young people across the country. In his weekly radio address, Clinton marked Black History Month and said although there had been strides in improving the economic and social situation for all Americans, worrying gaps remained.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling childhood illiteracy a "national emergency," Texas Gov. George W. Bush unveiled a five-year, $5-billion proposal Tuesday to ensure that all American children can read by the end of third grade. Bush's reading initiative would provide federal money to states to diagnose reading problems in kindergarten and first grade. It would pay for training kindergarten and first-grade teachers in reading instruction.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling childhood illiteracy a "national emergency," Texas Gov. George W. Bush unveiled a five-year, $5-billion proposal Tuesday to ensure that all American children can read by the end of third grade. Bush's reading initiative would provide federal money to states to diagnose reading problems in kindergarten and first grade. It would pay for training kindergarten and first-grade teachers in reading instruction.
NEWS
January 2, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when improving America's schools is a government priority, Congress has increasingly been raiding the money set aside for education reform to pay for pet projects, records and interviews show. In the current federal budget, lawmakers have dipped into national education money to finance perks for their home districts, honor retired colleagues and help well-connected constituents. Congress "went hog wild" bestowing such benefits, said Scott Fleming, the U.S.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton vetoed the first legislation of his term Wednesday, rejecting a $16.4-billion package of cuts that he said pared too much from education to preserve home-district "pork" spending. "If we're going to cut spending to balance the budget, we must be even more careful about how we spend the money we do have," Clinton declared, his jaw jutting, as he signed a veto message to Congress in a Rose Garden ceremony. "We have to put education and our children . . . first."
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Decrying racial disparities in the United States, President Clinton on Saturday announced $223 million in grants to help provide education and job training to up to 44,000 poor young people across the country. In his weekly radio address, Clinton marked Black History Month and said although there had been strides in improving the economic and social situation for all Americans, worrying gaps remained.
NEWS
January 2, 1999 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when improving America's schools is a government priority, Congress has increasingly been raiding the money set aside for education reform to pay for pet projects, records and interviews show. In the current federal budget, lawmakers have dipped into national education money to finance perks for their home districts, honor retired colleagues and help well-connected constituents. Congress "went hog wild" bestowing such benefits, said Scott Fleming, the U.S.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton vetoed the first legislation of his term Wednesday, rejecting a $16.4-billion package of cuts that he said pared too much from education to preserve home-district "pork" spending. "If we're going to cut spending to balance the budget, we must be even more careful about how we spend the money we do have," Clinton declared, his jaw jutting, as he signed a veto message to Congress in a Rose Garden ceremony. "We have to put education and our children . . . first."
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