Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Education
IN THE NEWS

United States Education

NEWS
April 16, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
With good reason, cries of alarm and despair erupted when the dismal results of the latest national reading exam for fourth-graders were released earlier this month. By contrast, few noticed when the outgoing Clinton administration in January released a comparably bleak assessment of Title I, the federal government's principal program to help low-income children perform better in school. Yet the two reports should be read in tandem.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | DUKE HELFAND and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITERS
Test scores of the nation's weakest elementary school readers declined sharply over the last eight years even as the strongest readers showed solid gains, according to data released Friday by the U.S. Department of Education. The widening gap between the best and worst fourth-grade readers underscored the failure of a multibillion-dollar government investment to raise the woeful performance of the nation's lowest achievers, federal education officials said.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | From Reuters
In a partial victory for President Bush's effort to introduce school vouchers, Senate and White House negotiators have agreed on a compromise education reform bill that would allow students in chronically failing schools to use federal funding for private tutoring. Hammered out by top Senate Republicans, Democrats and administration officials, the bill would also let students in failing schools transfer to another public school, congressional aides said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige toured South Park Elementary School in South Los Angeles this week, promoting President Bush's plan to beef up federal spending on education while requiring standards and testing to make states accountable. Paige gave a ringing endorsement to a suggestion in a recent article in Business Week magazine that Bush's goal is "every bit as audacious as Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty or John F. Kennedy's race to the moon."
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The education gap between Latinos and non-Latino whites is narrowing at the high school level but growing wider at the college level, the Census Bureau reported. The report said Latino adults are more than three times as likely as non-Latino whites to be high school dropouts. They are also nearly three times less likely to have college degrees. Overall, 57% of Latinos 25 and older are high school graduates, compared with 88% of non-Latino whites.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Establishing their bottom line for a legislative deal on the White House's top domestic priority, 10 centrist Senate Democrats have written President Bush that a bipartisan agreement on education reform "is well within our reach" if the administration backs off its demand for private school vouchers and agrees to substantially increase federal education spending.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush sent a strong signal Saturday that he is willing to compromise on his call for school vouchers--the most controversial aspect of his initiative to reform public education in America. In his first radio address as president, Bush touted his plan to funnel federal dollars to low-income families whose children attend troubled schools. Among other purposes, those dollars could be used for private school tuition.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday defended annual student tests, a centerpiece of his education proposals, as "the cornerstone of reform" for the nation's schools. He made his case at an all-black elementary school, surrounded by Democratic lawmakers, emphasizing both his outreach to African Americans and his attempt to find bipartisan consensus in Washington on such issues as education. The testing requirement is controversial among educators and parents.
NEWS
January 10, 2001 | From the Associated Press
Americans are wary of religion in the political arena but want more of it in public schools and think U.S. society would benefit if more people became devout, according to a poll released Monday by a secular think tank. Religion is the best way to strengthen moral behavior and family values, according to 69% of those polled by Public Agenda, a nonpartisan New York-based policy research agency founded by former Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and pollster Daniel Yankelovich.
NEWS
December 28, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A prominent group of investors and educators announced plans Wednesday to open a school in cyberspace that will allow students in kindergarten through 12th grade to get an education without ever stepping foot in a classroom. The new virtual campus is aimed at the nation's nearly 2 million home-schooled students, but its curriculum also is being marketed to school districts and parents who want to supplement the traditional public school education.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|