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United States Education

NEWS
January 10, 2001 | From the Associated Press
Americans are wary of religion in the political arena but want more of it in public schools and think U.S. society would benefit if more people became devout, according to a poll released Monday by a secular think tank. Religion is the best way to strengthen moral behavior and family values, according to 69% of those polled by Public Agenda, a nonpartisan New York-based policy research agency founded by former Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and pollster Daniel Yankelovich.
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NEWS
December 28, 2000 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A prominent group of investors and educators announced plans Wednesday to open a school in cyberspace that will allow students in kindergarten through 12th grade to get an education without ever stepping foot in a classroom. The new virtual campus is aimed at the nation's nearly 2 million home-schooled students, but its curriculum also is being marketed to school districts and parents who want to supplement the traditional public school education.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and congressional leaders agreed Monday on what aides described as the "framework" for a year-end budget deal, setting the stage for the lame-duck Congress to end its work as early as this week. But officials stressed that details of the prospective agreement to fund education, health and other programs remained to be ironed out as Republicans and Democrats gauge support for it. An accord on this front is likely to pave the way for settlement of other budget sticking points.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
President Clinton on Saturday sought to prod Congress to resolve the budget battle and approve billions of new federal dollars for schools, saying education is essential to continuing economic growth. "We must not take our economic strength for granted," he said in his weekly radio address, which for the second week in a row focused on an education spending package.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, Aliso Niguel seems like your average suburban public high school, or as average as a high school can be when many students drive luxury cars. But the folks at the U.S. Department of Education think otherwise, and on Thursday, U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley announced that the Aliso Viejo campus--only 7 years old--is a "New American High School."
NEWS
October 25, 2000 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George W. Bush campaigned Tuesday at two schools, but education was far from the top of his agenda. As gleeful Democrats hailed a new study that raised questions about his record on education as governor of Texas, Bush told supporters at a suburban Chicago school that education had been "a priority of mine" in Austin. But the Republican presidential candidate quickly moved on to his topic of the day, tax cuts, and said nothing about the study by the Rand Corp.
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore conducted a seminar of sorts on education Sunday, sitting back in the wicker furniture of his veranda in Washington, and talking about school policy with political activists, teachers and students. Gore plans to raise the issue several times this week as he prepares for his second debate with Texas Gov. George W. Bush on Wednesday in Winston-Salem, N.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
Most parents of school-age children support higher academic standards and the use of standardized tests, according to a survey released last week. "Based on this research--and surveys by other organizations--reports of the death of the standards movement have been wildly exaggerated," said Deborah Wadsworth, president of the nonprofit Public Agenda.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President Clinton on Monday pointed to higher test scores and more minority students taking advanced courses as evidence that the nation is in an "education revival," rebutting Texas Gov. George W. Bush's charge that the nation is in an "education recession."
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Despite years of intensive efforts to improve the performance of American students, scores in reading and science stagnated in the 1990s and the achievement gap between blacks and whites widened, according to the latest measure of long-term trends in the nation's classrooms. Over the 30 years of the federal assessment, the only substantial gains among students overall were in mathematics. The sobering results, released Thursday by the U.S.
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