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NEWS
May 31, 1990 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the realm of political advertising, the phrase "free TV" has become the rallying cry for a growing number of members of Congress who want to limit the enormous cost of political campaigns. Indeed, since Senate Democrats and Republicans recently began negotiations on a bipartisan bill to reform the nation's political campaign system, the issue of television advertising has proven to be the only aspect of the debate on which members of both parties can agree.
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NEWS
July 31, 2001 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-ribbon panel's report headed for the White House today recommends a broad series of changes in how the nation votes, including creating a federal holiday for national elections, forming a new federal agency to establish uniform voting standards and easing the use of absentee ballots. Aimed at preventing a repeat of last fall's chaotic election in Florida, the 100-page report is the work of a private, bipartisan commission chaired by former Presidents Ford and Carter.
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NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Reuters
Senate Republicans thwarted a planned test vote on banning unregulated "soft-money" donations Monday as intense parliamentary maneuvering strangled prospects for an overhaul of U.S. campaign fund-raising laws. The Senate endorsed the soft-money ban on a 92-1 procedural vote that was rendered meaningless when Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has led the fight against the ban, told his Republican colleagues to vote with its supporters.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The members of Voter News Service, an election consortium whose data were used by several news organizations in making wrong calls in last year's presidential election, have decided to keep the organization together and revamp its operations. The six member news organizations--ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN, Fox and Associated Press--had given themselves a June 1 deadline to decide whether to remain in the cooperative or opt out, members of the organization said. They said that all have decided to stay in.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate's move to ban large, unlimited cash contributions to political parties stands on strong legal ground and should survive court challenges, many legal experts say. However, the campaign finance reform measure approved Monday also seeks to restrict the language in "issue ads" that are broadcast within 60 days of an election, a provision that some experts say will be struck down.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Monday approved the broadest changes to campaign finance rules in a generation, including the first ban on unlimited donations to political parties, with a dozen Republicans joining a Democratic-led coalition that claimed the mantle of reform. The Senate voted 59 to 41 to pass the legislation sponsored by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.).
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though there was no final vote on their campaign finance reform bill Thursday, there was something of a victory parade for Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.). After beating back one last major amendment that threatened to undermine their bill, they bounded out the Senate chamber doors, waved off applause from Capitol Hill tourists and stopped to hug Granny D, the 91-year-old protester who has been walking circles around the Capitol in the name of reform.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Senate on Tuesday decisively rejected an amendment that would have capped but not ended the unlimited donations to political parties known as "soft money." Both sides called the vote the most significant victory yet for those who say banning such contributions is needed to clean up a political system too heavily influenced by big donors. These reform advocates, led by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Republican leadership agreed Friday to begin debate by the end of March on legislation to reform campaign finance laws, a breakthrough for those seeking to curb the influence of deep-pocket contributors on U.S. politics. The deal represented a victory for Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and others seeking to ban the largely unlimited donations to political parties known as soft money. Previously, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | Associated Press
A federal judge Friday dismissed a lawsuit by Ross Perot's Reform Party, which claimed that the laws that govern federal elections and campaign funding are unconstitutional and enforced in a discriminatory way against third parties. U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker said the campaign funding law, which provides different amounts of federal money to presidential candidates based on their parties' share of the vote in the last election, was upheld by the Supreme Court in 1976.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate's move to ban large, unlimited cash contributions to political parties stands on strong legal ground and should survive court challenges, many legal experts say. However, the campaign finance reform measure approved Monday also seeks to restrict the language in "issue ads" that are broadcast within 60 days of an election, a provision that some experts say will be struck down.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Monday approved the broadest changes to campaign finance rules in a generation, including the first ban on unlimited donations to political parties, with a dozen Republicans joining a Democratic-led coalition that claimed the mantle of reform. The Senate voted 59 to 41 to pass the legislation sponsored by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.).
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The campaign finance reform measure poised to pass the Senate today aims to curb something Americans often lament: the influence of big money in politics. But it will almost certainly worsen an affliction they complain about even more: the proliferation of junk mail, dinner-time phone calls and e-mail spam from parties and candidates seeking donations. At the core of the bill sponsored by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though there was no final vote on their campaign finance reform bill Thursday, there was something of a victory parade for Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.). After beating back one last major amendment that threatened to undermine their bill, they bounded out the Senate chamber doors, waved off applause from Capitol Hill tourists and stopped to hug Granny D, the 91-year-old protester who has been walking circles around the Capitol in the name of reform.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Senate on Tuesday decisively rejected an amendment that would have capped but not ended the unlimited donations to political parties known as "soft money." Both sides called the vote the most significant victory yet for those who say banning such contributions is needed to clean up a political system too heavily influenced by big donors. These reform advocates, led by Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Russell D. Feingold (D-Wis.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Republican leadership agreed Friday to begin debate by the end of March on legislation to reform campaign finance laws, a breakthrough for those seeking to curb the influence of deep-pocket contributors on U.S. politics. The deal represented a victory for Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and others seeking to ban the largely unlimited donations to political parties known as soft money. Previously, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
NEWS
September 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott said he would allow the Senate to take up legislation to change campaign finance laws, predicting the measure would come up for a vote as early as this week. The Mississippi Republican had been unwilling to resurrect the bill, which was abandoned earlier this year by the Senate after supporters failed to bring it before the full body.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Third-party candidates have no 1st Amendment right to participate in debates sponsored by public radio and TV stations, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. In a 6-3 vote, the court rejected the claim that because state-licensed channels are a part of the government, they must give equal access to all candidates who qualify to be on the ballot.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | ALAN C. MILLER and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Revelations about unreliable voting equipment and election procedures used in many places throughout the country have prompted lawmakers here and in state capitols to propose myriad ways to fix the system. But in numerous financially stretched counties, officials must weigh buying new machines against upgrading jails or funding schools. And some of the proposals do not seem to offer enough money to make a major dent in the cost of pricey new voting equipment.
NEWS
November 9, 2000 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson are said to have benefited from it. Dead people are sometimes parties to it. Both Democrats and Republicans have been accused of it. Voter fraud is a hallowed tradition in American electoral politics. Historically, when races got tight, party leaders could reach into a bag of dirty tricks that make the irregularities alleged this year in Florida, where the final count will determine the next president, seem like child's play.
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