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United States Elections 1988

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NEWS
November 10, 1988 | From Associated Press
Measures restricting abortion were passed in three states, while five states liberalized their gambling rules, election returns showed Wednesday. These were among results of 238 statewide ballot questions resolved in 41 states in Tuesday's election. Michigan, Colorado and Arkansas voters approved bans on state-financed abortions, with Arkansas voters approving an amendment that protects life beginning at conception.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Over the past three years, as Congress debated legislation to limit hostile business takeovers, Texas corporate takeover specialist Harold C. Simmons and his family pumped more than $250,000 into the campaign coffers of key federal office-seekers. In the process, Simmons' contributions more than doubled the legal limit on political giving by the very rich.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1989
In the wake of reports that Vice President Dan Quayle's own staff was critical of him during the 1988 election campaign, his chief speech writer during that time defended Quayle in a speech in Irvine on Wednesday. Kenneth L. Khachigian, 44, a San Clemente attorney, accused the authors of a new book of "selectively choosing comments, quotations and observations to confirm a pre-selected view" of the vice president. The book, "Whose Broad Stripes and Bright Stars?
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From United Press International
The 1988 presidential primaries that narrowed the field to a choice between George Bush and Michael S. Dukakis cost $250.3 million--about $66 million of which was paid by taxpayer funds, the Federal Election Commission reported Friday. The primaries, by far the most expensive in history, involved a total of 16 candidates who reported receiving about $253 million.
NEWS
March 28, 1989
It cost more than $204 million to fill the 435 House seats in the November election, with incumbents--almost all of whom won--trouncing opponents in donations, spending and political action committee money, according to a new study. The report from Common Cause, a self-styled public interest group, showed that the 789 candidates who ran for the House in the general election raised $240.9 million and spent $204.3 million. PACs contributed a record $99.6 million.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
There is no truth to the rumor that the same people who make out airline fare schedules and devise the formula to pick NFL wild card playoff teams also dreamed up the rules for this year's presidential primaries and caucuses. It just seems that way. Republicans and Democrats have been wooed by candidates for months, and Monday night's caucuses here launch a new phase in the courtship as voters across the country quit flirting and start cozying up to whomever they want to get serious with.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
By a quirk of antiquated American law, George Bush Wednesday became the first vice president since Martin Van Buren 150 years ago to inform Congress officially that he had won the presidential election. Responding to this two-month-old "news" and the formal counting of electoral votes, members of the House and Senate erupted into cheers and gave Bush a standing ovation as he declared himself and his running mate, Dan Quayle, the victors over Democratic foes Michael S. Dukakis and Sen. Lloyd M.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From United Press International
The 1988 presidential primaries that narrowed the field to a choice between George Bush and Michael S. Dukakis cost $250.3 million--about $66 million of which was paid by taxpayer funds, the Federal Election Commission reported Friday. The primaries, by far the most expensive in history, involved a total of 16 candidates who reported receiving about $253 million.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Over the past three years, as Congress debated legislation to limit hostile business takeovers, Texas corporate takeover specialist Harold C. Simmons and his family pumped more than $250,000 into the campaign coffers of key federal office-seekers. In the process, Simmons' contributions more than doubled the legal limit on political giving by the very rich.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Three men were convicted Wednesday in the execution-style murder of a rookie policeman whose death became an issue in last year's presidential campaign and helped set the national agenda in the war on drugs. Scott Cobb, 25, was convicted of second-degree murder and weapons charges for his role in the death of Officer Edward Byrne, 22, who was shot five times on Feb. 26, 1988, while he sat in his patrol car guarding the home of a witness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1989
In the wake of reports that Vice President Dan Quayle's own staff was critical of him during the 1988 election campaign, his chief speech writer during that time defended Quayle in a speech in Irvine on Wednesday. Kenneth L. Khachigian, 44, a San Clemente attorney, accused the authors of a new book of "selectively choosing comments, quotations and observations to confirm a pre-selected view" of the vice president. The book, "Whose Broad Stripes and Bright Stars?
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Three men were convicted Wednesday in the execution-style murder of a rookie policeman whose death became an issue in last year's presidential campaign and helped set the national agenda in the war on drugs. Scott Cobb, 25, was convicted of second-degree murder and weapons charges for his role in the death of Officer Edward Byrne, 22, who was shot five times on Feb. 26, 1988, while he sat in his patrol car guarding the home of a witness.
NEWS
March 28, 1989
It cost more than $204 million to fill the 435 House seats in the November election, with incumbents--almost all of whom won--trouncing opponents in donations, spending and political action committee money, according to a new study. The report from Common Cause, a self-styled public interest group, showed that the 789 candidates who ran for the House in the general election raised $240.9 million and spent $204.3 million. PACs contributed a record $99.6 million.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
By a quirk of antiquated American law, George Bush Wednesday became the first vice president since Martin Van Buren 150 years ago to inform Congress officially that he had won the presidential election. Responding to this two-month-old "news" and the formal counting of electoral votes, members of the House and Senate erupted into cheers and gave Bush a standing ovation as he declared himself and his running mate, Dan Quayle, the victors over Democratic foes Michael S. Dukakis and Sen. Lloyd M.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | From Associated Press
Measures restricting abortion were passed in three states, while five states liberalized their gambling rules, election returns showed Wednesday. These were among results of 238 statewide ballot questions resolved in 41 states in Tuesday's election. Michigan, Colorado and Arkansas voters approved bans on state-financed abortions, with Arkansas voters approving an amendment that protects life beginning at conception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1988 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to bolster the country's Latino voice in this year's elections, an organization of Spanish-language publications on Friday announced a national voter-registration campaign. Zeke Montes, president of the National Assn. of Hispanic Publications, said the effort will be waged through public service ads and editorials urging Latinos to register to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1988 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to bolster the country's Latino voice in this year's elections, an organization of Spanish-language publications on Friday announced a national voter-registration campaign. Zeke Montes, president of the National Assn. of Hispanic Publications, said the effort will be waged through public service ads and editorials urging Latinos to register to vote.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
There is no truth to the rumor that the same people who make out airline fare schedules and devise the formula to pick NFL wild card playoff teams also dreamed up the rules for this year's presidential primaries and caucuses. It just seems that way. Republicans and Democrats have been wooed by candidates for months, and Monday night's caucuses here launch a new phase in the courtship as voters across the country quit flirting and start cozying up to whomever they want to get serious with.
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