Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Elections 1992
IN THE NEWS

United States Elections 1992

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Tobacco companies have donated more than $2 million in so-called "soft money" to the Democratic and Republican parties so far in this election campaign, up from $486,000 during the entire 1988 campaign, according to a report released Wednesday. Two consumer groups, Ralph Nader's Public Citizen and the Advocacy Institute, condemned the Bush Administration and both political parties for accepting "blood money" from tobacco interests and for employing those with ties to the industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did America flinch last week? A year ago, all the pieces appeared to be in place for economic change. The nation finally seemed ready to tackle the government's long overdue accounts and put its fiscal house in order. An angry electorate vilified Washington for gridlock and demanded that it address the federal budget deficit and other basic economic issues that had been ignored or finessed by a generation of political leaders. The 1992 election, if nothing else, was a mandate for action.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About midday on Tuesday, when Lynn Yeakel sensed that she had done the amazing and come out of nowhere to win the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania, she called the president of the National Women's Political Caucus. "I hope the women will get the credit," Yeakel told caucus president Harriett Woods. "I feel that women are standing up and making this possible."
NEWS
November 6, 1992
Results of voting Tuesday on environmental issues. Vote counts are complete or at 97% or higher : APPROVED Alabama: Create Forever Wild program for state to buy, preserve wilderness. Won 82% to 18%. South Dakota: Limit large-scale gold and silver surface mining in Black Hills. Won 57% to 43%. REJECTED Massachusetts: Require recyclable, reusable packaging. Lost 59% to 41%. Excise tax on toxic chemicals, some petroleum products. Lost 59% to 41%.
NEWS
November 6, 1992
Results of voting Tuesday on environmental issues. Vote counts are complete or at 97% or higher : APPROVED Alabama: Create Forever Wild program for state to buy, preserve wilderness. Won 82% to 18%. South Dakota: Limit large-scale gold and silver surface mining in Black Hills. Won 57% to 43%. REJECTED Massachusetts: Require recyclable, reusable packaging. Lost 59% to 41%. Excise tax on toxic chemicals, some petroleum products. Lost 59% to 41%.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
Illinois: Carol Moseley Braun became the first black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. Colorado: Democratic Rep. Ben Nighthorse Campbell defeated Republican Terry Considine in a tough race, becoming the only American Indian in the Senate. Washington, D.C.: Voters returned former Mayor Marion Barry to elective office--a city council seat. Vermont: Democratic Gov. Howard Dean was elected in what was once the nation's most Republican state.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivering an unmistakable message to career politicians, Californians on Tuesday joined at least a dozen other states in slapping term limits on their representatives in Congress. In a clear display of their thirst for political turnover, California voters heartily approved Proposition 164, a measure that would restrict House members to three terms in office and U.S. senators to two.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did America flinch last week? A year ago, all the pieces appeared to be in place for economic change. The nation finally seemed ready to tackle the government's long overdue accounts and put its fiscal house in order. An angry electorate vilified Washington for gridlock and demanded that it address the federal budget deficit and other basic economic issues that had been ignored or finessed by a generation of political leaders. The 1992 election, if nothing else, was a mandate for action.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring himself a "follow-the-yellow-brick-road kind of guy," Palm Springs Mayor Sonny Bono announced Tuesday that he will run for the U.S. Senate in 1992 unless a panel of advisers persuades him to "forget it." Bono, best known for his role on the erstwhile "Sonny and Cher" television show, said last week's poor election turnout suggests that Californians are weary of the status quo and ready for "a guy from the streets, somebody like me."
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | RON BROWNSTEIN and ROBERT SHOGAN
CAMPAIGN '92: Both major political parties are pushing to revamp their campaign strategies for 1992 in the wake of the November election. Democrats, buoyed by their gains in the House following the mid-autumn budget debacle, plan to expand their new "economic fairness" theme in the 102nd Congress.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All right--now what? Women candidates who broke the tape by the hundreds in political races in California and across the country will now have the chance--and the obligation--to show just what makes them different, and how to make that difference work for them and their constituents. At a news conference in Washington on Thursday, women's political groups who had encouraged and funded women candidates were counting the numbers like winning stacks of chips.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Upset about the economy and worried about the nation's future, voters streamed to the polls Tuesday in numbers that reversed a 32-year-long slide in voter turnout. According to preliminary tallies, about 104 million Americans cast their ballots--the first time the 100-million mark has been reached in a U.S. election. The number of voters represented about 55% of the eligible adults, the largest proportion since 55.2% voted in 1972. By contrast, only 50.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Energized by a 14-state sweep, proponents of congressional term limits Wednesday set their sights on a constitutional amendment that would allow them to skirt the legal questions imperiling their burgeoning movement. Noting that most states embraced restrictions on officeholders by 2-1 margins Tuesday, triumphant leaders of the nationwide term limit drive claimed they have a "clear and unequivocal mandate" that demands an immediate response from Congress.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
Illinois: Carol Moseley Braun became the first black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. Colorado: Democratic Rep. Ben Nighthorse Campbell defeated Republican Terry Considine in a tough race, becoming the only American Indian in the Senate. Washington, D.C.: Voters returned former Mayor Marion Barry to elective office--a city council seat. Vermont: Democratic Gov. Howard Dean was elected in what was once the nation's most Republican state.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delivering an unmistakable message to career politicians, Californians on Tuesday joined at least a dozen other states in slapping term limits on their representatives in Congress. In a clear display of their thirst for political turnover, California voters heartily approved Proposition 164, a measure that would restrict House members to three terms in office and U.S. senators to two.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Tobacco companies have donated more than $2 million in so-called "soft money" to the Democratic and Republican parties so far in this election campaign, up from $486,000 during the entire 1988 campaign, according to a report released Wednesday. Two consumer groups, Ralph Nader's Public Citizen and the Advocacy Institute, condemned the Bush Administration and both political parties for accepting "blood money" from tobacco interests and for employing those with ties to the industry.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The compromise budget accord hammered out by the Republican White House and the Democrat-controlled Congress raises the curtain on the battle for the presidency in 1992--and foreshadows the major battle lines between and within the parties during the next two years. Bush is banking on the hope that the harsh economic nostrums of spending cuts and tax increases prescribed for 1990 will be all but forgotten two years hence when, if all goes well, the revitalized economy will be soaring.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder emerged Saturday from a month deliberately out of the spotlight to deliver a fiery attack on President Bush and fellow Democrats and to lay out the rationale for his likely 1992 presidential campaign. Wilder took to task not only Bush but also many "fiscal pretenders on the campaign trail" in his own party, including a jab that appeared directed at a potential foe in the Democratic race--New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Groups that raise money for female candidates are reporting that donations have doubled and tripled over the previous election cycle. One such group, Emily's List, raised $1.5 million for 14 female candidates in 1990; this time, the group said it already has raised $1.25 million and has contributed to 30 female candidates so far. "The (Clarence) Thomas hearings (accounted for) part of the increase," said Emily's List communications director Deborah Hicks.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Berkeley publisher John Javna operates on the principle that individual actions can make a difference, even in today's mass-marketed world. He first tested his theory in 1989 when his small EarthWorks Press published "50 Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth." It worked. "50 Simple Things" topped Publisher's Weekly trade paperback bestseller list in 1990, sold 3.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|