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United States Elections 1994

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NEWS
November 10, 1994
Here are the latest returns in the races for governor nationwide. (i)=incumbent Party Vote ALABAMA Jim Folsom (i) D 49.9% Fob James Jr. R 50.
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NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
A federal judge ruled Monday that the Christian Coalition did not illegally aid Republican candidates by distributing voter guides to churches, handing a victory to a group hoping to regain lost clout and donors after two difficult years. "It allows us to go unfettered into 2000 for the largest, most comprehensive get-out-the-vote effort in the history of grass-roots politics," said Randy Tate, the coalition's chief lobbyist.
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NEWS
November 9, 1994
The major races in the East: Senate races: 11 House races: 100 Governor: 11 Governor--Republican John G. Rowland narrowly defeated Democrat William E. Curry Jr. despite losing support because of his efforts to keep confidential a police report of a nonviolent dispute with his ex-wife. Rowland will succeed retiring Gov. Lowell P. Weicker Jr., an independent. * Senate--Incumbent Democrat Joseph I. Lieberman handily defeated Republican opponent Jerry Labriola for a second term.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | RITA BEAMISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington politicians weren't the only victims of voter disgust this year. The country's news media also got a less-than-encouraging report card for campaign coverage, exit polling showed. In exit polls conducted for the Times Mirror Center for The People & The Press, 59% of those surveyed gave the press a grade of C or below for coverage of the midterm congressional and gubernatorial races. Only 38% said the news media deserved an A or B for good to excellent coverage.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Jack Kemp, likely a strong candidate for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, has told GOP office seekers who want his help this year that he will campaign for them only if they actively canvass for votes in minority neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | from Associated Press
Democratic National Chairman David Wilhelm predicted Saturday that President Clinton's Whitewater troubles will subside by midsummer and will not be a major issue in November's congressional elections. "I think Whitewater will recede . . . because the President and the First Lady are cooperating with the special counsel," Wilhelm said on CNN's "Evans & Novak" show. "They're answering the questions that are being raised."
NEWS
March 11, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Republican strategists, already savoring the discomfort inflicted on President Clinton by the burgeoning Whitewater controversy, now hope to reap a much larger political bonanza. With polls showing Whitewater hurting both the President and the First Lady, some GOP officials said that the impact could extend to Democrats running in next November's congressional races and inflict long-term damage on the national party as a whole. Rep. Bill Paxon (R-N.Y.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Republican Party swept into power in Congress this month, hopes were initially raised that weapons systems like the B-2 bomber, built by Northrop Grumman Corp., would get a new lease on life. The Los Angles-based aerospace firm wants to sell the Pentagon 20 more B-2s for $11.4 billion. According to the company, that's a bargain basement price that would be a lot cheaper than alternative high-technology missiles and would preserve 13,000 jobs in California.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1994 | JOHN BRENNAN, JOHN BRENNAN is director of the Los Angeles Times Poll.
Political pundits look for revolution in each election. Searching through the rubble voters leave behind, they desperately seek the harbingers of a future that cannot be seen. One election cannot predict the next. With that disclaimer given, this reporter will now proceed to add his examination of the entrails to the pile. Some see this election as a permanent sharp rightward swerve on the public's part. But what happened is more complex.
NEWS
November 9, 1994
The major races in the South: Senate races: 7 House races: 137 Governor: 8 * Governor--Incumbent Democrat Jim Folsom was running neck and neck with his GOP challenger, Fob James Jr., with three-fourths of the vote counted. * House--Four of the seven seats were held by Democrats before the election, and that division did not change.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Republican Party swept into power in Congress this month, hopes were initially raised that weapons systems like the B-2 bomber, built by Northrop Grumman Corp., would get a new lease on life. The Los Angles-based aerospace firm wants to sell the Pentagon 20 more B-2s for $11.4 billion. According to the company, that's a bargain basement price that would be a lot cheaper than alternative high-technology missiles and would preserve 13,000 jobs in California.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When incoming Republican leaders met last week to fulfill an election pledge to slash House committees, the panel targeted for one of the biggest hits was one that has long been a thorn in the side of the GOP and its business allies: the Energy and Commerce Committee. Over the past 14 years, the committee has grown into a sprawling powerhouse under the chairmanship of Rep. John D.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1994 | JOHN BRENNAN, JOHN BRENNAN is director of the Los Angeles Times Poll.
Political pundits look for revolution in each election. Searching through the rubble voters leave behind, they desperately seek the harbingers of a future that cannot be seen. One election cannot predict the next. With that disclaimer given, this reporter will now proceed to add his examination of the entrails to the pile. Some see this election as a permanent sharp rightward swerve on the public's part. But what happened is more complex.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin warned his top military officers on Monday to steel themselves for "a certain toughening" in U.S. foreign and military policy toward Russia in the wake of Republican midterm election gains. In his first public reaction to the new conservative wave in American politics, Yeltsin also told a conference of Russian army officers he had realized that "it's necessary to work out relations with the Republicans, to even out our relations with the U.S."
NEWS
November 15, 1994
U.S. politics proved fair game for the sharp pens of editorial cartoonists in Latin America, Europe and Asia last week. Whether in a comical look at Bill Clinton amid a herd of GOP elephants or more biting views from Mexico of California's Proposition 187, the foreign press showed the midterm elections were a big story beyond the U.S. frontier. Whatever the angle, the message was clear: a black eye for the Clinton White House.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the charges, countercharges and remarkably angry tenor of this year's congressional campaigns, nearly three out of four voters say they feel they learned enough about the candidates to make informed choices, according to a new post-election survey of voters.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to persuade the cynical and move the faithful to action, activists within the Christian Coalition are passing out 33 million voter guides to elections from coast to coast and hope to make 2 million phone calls for their candidates by the Tuesday election. In several states, the AFL-CIO's phone banks are now humming day and night and environmental advocates are working side by side with favored candidates' workers in a handful of races considered crucial for their cause.
NEWS
October 13, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrats who once assured Americans that they had nothing to fear but fear itself now are striving to scare them into going to the polls in hopes of staving off a potential disaster in next month's midterm election.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sounding frustrated and weary, President Clinton complained Thursday about the judgment of angry voters in the midterm elections and sent signals that he intends to move farther to the right--away from the liberal wing of his party. In a notably downbeat assessment, Clinton told a Georgetown University audience that in "normal times" he and other Democrats would have gotten greater credit. "But this is no ordinary time," Clinton said.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Countering the conservative wave that washed over much of the nation, gays enjoyed several key victories this week, most notably the election of a lesbian to the California Legislature and the defeat of anti-gay rights initiatives in Oregon and Idaho. In winning the 41st Assembly District seat, Democrat Sheila James Kuehl of Santa Monica became the first openly gay member of the California Legislature.
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