Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited States Embassies
IN THE NEWS

United States Embassies

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999
The world's richest, most powerful, most internationally visible country has an overseas diplomatic presence that is approaching "a state of crisis." The United States' embassies and related facilities are in many cases antiquated and shabby, and computer networks are absurdly inefficient. Some missions are overstaffed while others lack adequate personnel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Criminal prosecutions of terrorism, while rarely nabbing the masterminds, can at least distract and sometimes deter future attacks, experts said Tuesday. Building a case against defendants such as those convicted of the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa--allegedly part of the network of Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden--typically takes years, and often faces major obstacles in evidence-gathering.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was October, 1979, and staffers at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran were rushing to shred their secret files before the Iranian Revolutionary Guards--who were about to capture the building and hold 52 Americans hostage for 63 weeks--could break down the doors. The shredding operation was successful but unavailing.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | From Reuters
A juror suffering dental pain caused deliberations to be cut short Wednesday in the case against four followers of Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden, charged with plotting to bomb U.S. embassies in Africa. The Manhattan federal jury received the case late May 10. The panel, which is not sequestered and has not met on weekends, is scheduled to resume deliberations today.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush recognizes the Baltic nations today, and later possibly other newly independent Soviet republics, some lucky diplomats will be on the cutting edge of American foreign policy. These Foreign Service officers probably will be dispatched from the U.S. embassy in Moscow.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An independent panel issued a stinging report Friday on the state of America's overseas diplomatic missions, concluding that they are overstaffed, poorly organized, woefully equipped and living in a bygone technological age. "We are perilously close to a state of crisis," said panel chairman Lewis Kaden, a New York attorney with ties to the Clinton administration. "There are great people out there, but they are not being given the tools to work in the right way."
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Criminal prosecutions of terrorism, while rarely nabbing the masterminds, can at least distract and sometimes deter future attacks, experts said Tuesday. Building a case against defendants such as those convicted of the bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa--allegedly part of the network of Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden--typically takes years, and often faces major obstacles in evidence-gathering.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Embassies Spurn $100 Bills: The State Department has ordered its overseas posts not to accept $100 bills for fear they might be counterfeit. Fifties are also viewed with suspicion. U.S. posts abroad charge fees for passport renewals, visa issuance, library use and a variety of other services. Problems with counterfeit $100 bills have led the Treasury to print millions of subtly changed C-notes with a tiny polyester thread embedded in them to prevent their duplication by color copiers.
NEWS
February 12, 1988
The State Department failed to seek further investigation of more than 500 infractions by Marine security guards at U.S. embassies at a time when Soviet spies apparently were mounting a worldwide effort to recruit them as agents, a House subcommittee chairman said. Rep. Daniel A. Mica (D-Fla.) said a preliminary investigation by the General Accounting Office, a congressional watchdog agency, indicates "there may have been a KGB worldwide effort to recruit Marines" at U.S.
NEWS
May 14, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Just inside the main entrance to the State Department building are two black marble plaques inscribed with the names of 155 American diplomats who died while representing their country abroad. For the first 189 years of American independence 73 names were recorded, most as a result of tropical diseases, natural disasters and shipwrecks. But since 1965, another 82 names have been added, virtually all of them the victims of terrorists' bombs and bullets.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal jury in New York ended its third full day of deliberations in the case against four Osama bin Laden followers charged in a plot to kill Americans that included the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. Bin Laden is believed to be the mastermind behind the Nairobi and Dar es Salaam bombings that killed 224 people. Before leaving for the day, jurors asked for evidence involving Ali Mohamed, a former U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999
The world's richest, most powerful, most internationally visible country has an overseas diplomatic presence that is approaching "a state of crisis." The United States' embassies and related facilities are in many cases antiquated and shabby, and computer networks are absurdly inefficient. Some missions are overstaffed while others lack adequate personnel.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An independent panel issued a stinging report Friday on the state of America's overseas diplomatic missions, concluding that they are overstaffed, poorly organized, woefully equipped and living in a bygone technological age. "We are perilously close to a state of crisis," said panel chairman Lewis Kaden, a New York attorney with ties to the Clinton administration. "There are great people out there, but they are not being given the tools to work in the right way."
NEWS
August 20, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON and DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of extremist Islamic groups linked to a dissident Saudi millionaire has issued new threats against the United States, an Arabic newspaper reported Wednesday. In a statement sent to the Cairo bureau of the Pan-Arab daily Al Hayat, a group calling itself the International Islamic Front for Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders warned that recent "holy struggle operations" against the United States will continue "until all American forces retreat from the Islamic lands."
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Bush recognizes the Baltic nations today, and later possibly other newly independent Soviet republics, some lucky diplomats will be on the cutting edge of American foreign policy. These Foreign Service officers probably will be dispatched from the U.S. embassy in Moscow.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Embassies Spurn $100 Bills: The State Department has ordered its overseas posts not to accept $100 bills for fear they might be counterfeit. Fifties are also viewed with suspicion. U.S. posts abroad charge fees for passport renewals, visa issuance, library use and a variety of other services. Problems with counterfeit $100 bills have led the Treasury to print millions of subtly changed C-notes with a tiny polyester thread embedded in them to prevent their duplication by color copiers.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The State Department has devised a program aimed at increasing security and reducing the number of foreigners in U.S. embassies throughout Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe, a senior department official said Wednesday. The program will be implemented in three phases, taking longer to complete its security goals than some security officials and congressmen have proposed, the official said. One bill now in Congress would eliminate all foreign nationals in these embassies within two years.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trouble with being the second in charge at the Embassy of Rwanda is that: * You have to lure people to your embassy's infrequent receptions; * Amnesty International sends delegations to your embassy to charge that political prisoners are being mistreated in your country; * Before your foreign minister comes to Washington, you have to spend weeks trying to persuade important congressmen to see him; * You don't have the run of a 59-room Tudor mansion like the Italian ambassador does.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was October, 1979, and staffers at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran were rushing to shred their secret files before the Iranian Revolutionary Guards--who were about to capture the building and hold 52 Americans hostage for 63 weeks--could break down the doors. The shredding operation was successful but unavailing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|