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NEWS
July 27, 1988
Rocket salvos fired into Kabul by Afghan rebels during the past week have killed at least 50 people and damaged the U.S. and French embassies in the fiercest barrage to hit the Afghan capital in four years, Western diplomats in New Delhi said. They also quoted a "reliable diplomat" as saying that 15 to 20 Soviet soldiers were killed in a July 18 guerrilla ambush in Logar province, about 20 miles south of Kabul.
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NEWS
December 18, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KABUL, Afghanistan-U.S. Marines hoisted Old Glory outside the American Embassy on Monday, reopening the mission and signaling that the United States and the international community have taken Afghanistan back into their ranks after 13 years. "We are here, and we are here to stay," the U.S. special envoy on Afghanistan, James Dobbins, declared at a dreary, rain-soaked ceremony. The same flag lowered during the 1989 U.S. withdrawal was restored to its staff in the rubble-strewn courtyard. The U.S.
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NEWS
December 18, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KABUL, Afghanistan-U.S. Marines hoisted Old Glory outside the American Embassy on Monday, reopening the mission and signaling that the United States and the international community have taken Afghanistan back into their ranks after 13 years. "We are here, and we are here to stay," the U.S. special envoy on Afghanistan, James Dobbins, declared at a dreary, rain-soaked ceremony. The same flag lowered during the 1989 U.S. withdrawal was restored to its staff in the rubble-strewn courtyard. The U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typically icy February morning here in the Afghan capital that day, when what appeared to be a routine traffic stop suddenly became a kidnap-murder that sent shock waves around the world. The snow was packed deep on the peaks of the Hindu Kush all around, and the morning traffic, as always, was snarled around the downtown intersection between the U.S. Cultural Center and the headquarters of the Soviet-style Afghan secret police.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Describing the Afghan government as "a building without its girders," the head of the closed U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan predicted Wednesday that the Soviet-backed government of President Najibullah will fall within months. Jon Glassman, the U.S.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, on his first day on the job, decided Thursday to close the U.S. Embassy in Kabul amid rising turmoil during a Soviet troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, a U.S. official said. The U.S. diplomatic contingent in Kabul had already been reduced to fewer than 10 officers and security guards. Their situation is considered precarious in light of a bitter civil war between the pro-Moscow government and U.S.-armed guerrillas. The U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration's decision to close the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan, a key listening post in the bloody, nine-year conflict there, already has had a far-reaching impact on a war that has relied as heavily on propaganda and perception as it has on arms and artillery, Western, Afghan and Soviet diplomats said here Saturday.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a typically icy February morning here in the Afghan capital that day, when what appeared to be a routine traffic stop suddenly became a kidnap-murder that sent shock waves around the world. The snow was packed deep on the peaks of the Hindu Kush all around, and the morning traffic, as always, was snarled around the downtown intersection between the U.S. Cultural Center and the headquarters of the Soviet-style Afghan secret police.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Marine guards lowered the Stars and Stripes in a brief ceremony Monday outside the U.S. Embassy, temporarily closing the mission as Muslim rebels encircled the Afghan capital awaiting a Soviet withdrawal. "We are honored to have served and helped the Afghan people toward peace and freedom," U.S. Charge d'Affaires John Glassman said. "We will be back as soon as the conflict is over. We say goodby, and God bless the United States of America. We are going home."
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Describing the Afghan government as "a building without its girders," the head of the closed U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan predicted Wednesday that the Soviet-backed government of President Najibullah will fall within months. Jon Glassman, the U.S.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Marine guards lowered the Stars and Stripes in a brief ceremony Monday outside the U.S. Embassy, temporarily closing the mission as Muslim rebels encircled the Afghan capital awaiting a Soviet withdrawal. "We are honored to have served and helped the Afghan people toward peace and freedom," U.S. Charge d'Affaires John Glassman said. "We will be back as soon as the conflict is over. We say goodby, and God bless the United States of America. We are going home."
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration's decision to close the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan, a key listening post in the bloody, nine-year conflict there, already has had a far-reaching impact on a war that has relied as heavily on propaganda and perception as it has on arms and artillery, Western, Afghan and Soviet diplomats said here Saturday.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, on his first day on the job, decided Thursday to close the U.S. Embassy in Kabul amid rising turmoil during a Soviet troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, a U.S. official said. The U.S. diplomatic contingent in Kabul had already been reduced to fewer than 10 officers and security guards. Their situation is considered precarious in light of a bitter civil war between the pro-Moscow government and U.S.-armed guerrillas. The U.S.
NEWS
July 27, 1988
Rocket salvos fired into Kabul by Afghan rebels during the past week have killed at least 50 people and damaged the U.S. and French embassies in the fiercest barrage to hit the Afghan capital in four years, Western diplomats in New Delhi said. They also quoted a "reliable diplomat" as saying that 15 to 20 Soviet soldiers were killed in a July 18 guerrilla ambush in Logar province, about 20 miles south of Kabul.
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