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NEWS
July 29, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department blundered at every stage of its investigation of a former diplomat suspected of accepting bribes and other favors in exchange for visas he issued from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, congressional investigators said Wednesday.
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NEWS
May 1, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Monday that he will nominate Clark "Sandy" Randt Jr., a Hong Kong-based business lawyer and his onetime college fraternity brother, as the next U.S. ambassador to China. A fluent Mandarin speaker, Randt earned a law degree at the University of Michigan after graduating from Yale. He served as U.S. commercial attache in Beijing from 1982 to 1984 and is a partner in the New York firm Shearman & Sterling.
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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | Reuters
Italy said Saturday that it is willing to provide a humanitarian haven for China's top dissident, Fang Lizhi, holed up in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing for the past year. A Foreign Ministry spokesman said no formal request has yet been made by either the American or Chinese governments for Italy to take the 54-year-old astrophysicist.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department blundered at every stage of its investigation of a former diplomat suspected of accepting bribes and other favors in exchange for visas he issued from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, congressional investigators said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From United Press International
China on Wednesday dismissed as "speculation" the reports of a deal to free the country's leading dissident from refuge in the U.S. Embassy, but Western diplomats and Chinese sources said the negotiations are continuing. "The recent rumors about the question of Fang Lizhi floating around abroad and overseas are speculation pure and simple," the Chinese Foreign Ministry statement said, reiterating that the embassy refuge was "interference in China's internal affairs."
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
In an official move likely to further strain Washington's relations with China's new hard-line leadership, the U.S. Embassy here filed an angry protest with the Chinese government Monday, charging that People's Liberation Army troops deliberately targeted the apartments of American diplomats June 7 in a "premeditated" machine-gun attack on a diplomatic apartment complex in downtown Beijing.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
China's leadership released a 25,000-word document Thursday, stating its case for last month's brutal army crackdown on the pro-democracy movement and linking ousted Communist Party chief Zhao Ziyang and some of the country's most prominent intellectuals to a "political conspiracy" to overthrow the party's conservative leaders with help and financing from abroad.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | United Press International
The State Department confirmed the presence of a prominent Chinese dissident in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, evidently against the wishes of U.S. Ambassador James R. Lilley, CBS News reported Thursday. Lilley, interviewed in Beijing by CBS, refused to comment on whether Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist who has been dubbed the "Andrei Sakharov of China," is staying at the Embassy. Fang, 53, was expelled from the Communist Party in 1987. Lilley became visibly angry when asked about State Department reports that Fang had taken refuge at the embassy to avoid falling victim to the Communist government's crackdown on the pro-democracy movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The number of Chinese diplomats in Los Angeles exceeds the limit agreed upon when China opened its consulate in the city last year, according to knowledgeable U.S. officials. China's new consulate in Los Angeles was supposed to have a staff of 31. But the FBI recently notified the State Department that 38 or 39 Chinese diplomats were working there, and that some Chinese officials in Los Angeles were operating out of their residences rather than the consulate, the sources said.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Reuters
China will allow dissident Fang Lizhi to leave the U.S. Embassy in Beijing where he has been since June and travel to Australia before the end of this month, a Hong Kong magazine said Tuesday. Both the American and Australian consulates in Hong Kong declined to comment on the report. The magazine Pai Shing, without revealing its sources, said a preliminary understanding was reached during a visit to Beijing in December by U.S. National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft.
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could hear it in their voices as they peppered President Clinton with questions. "You said that the reason for your visit to China is because China is too important, and engagement is better than containment," the young man told Clinton during the president's trip to Beijing University last June. "Is this a . . . commitment you made for your visit, or do you have other things hidden behind [your] smile? Do you have any designs to contain China?"
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | HENRY CHU and MAGGIE FARLEY and ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chinese protesters infuriated by the deadly NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia continued violent demonstrations into their third day today, attacking American diplomatic missions across the country and trapping the American ambassador inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. "No question that we're hostages here," James R. Sasser told CBS-TV's "Face the Nation" by telephone on Sunday.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST and TYLER MARSHALL and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When he was dismissed from his post as a senior U.S. diplomat here, Charles Matthew Parish braced for what he expected would be a grueling investigation of his activities. His superiors accused Parish of using his position to grant visas for friends, of accepting gifts in excess of strict State Department limits, and of improper fraternization with Chinese women.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In effect, they are hostages and political exiles marooned on a tiny American island amid a churning Chinese ocean. American diplomats have privately dubbed them "the guests," or sometimes, "the furniture." He is China's leading dissident, Fang Lizhi, and she is his wife, Li Shuxian. And they've spent the last year, since soon after the bloodletting around Tian An Men Square last June, in the American Embassy in Beijing, waiting for statesmen to negotiate their future.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | Reuters
Italy said Saturday that it is willing to provide a humanitarian haven for China's top dissident, Fang Lizhi, holed up in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing for the past year. A Foreign Ministry spokesman said no formal request has yet been made by either the American or Chinese governments for Italy to take the 54-year-old astrophysicist.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's highly publicized effort to win the release of Chinese dissidents Fang Lizhi and Li Shuxian from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing has run into serious obstacles that could scuttle chances for a deal. Since the mission to China last month by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, the Administration has been exploring a deal with the Chinese regime that would enable Fang and Li, his wife, to go abroad. They have been confined inside the U.S.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced Monday that he will nominate Clark "Sandy" Randt Jr., a Hong Kong-based business lawyer and his onetime college fraternity brother, as the next U.S. ambassador to China. A fluent Mandarin speaker, Randt earned a law degree at the University of Michigan after graduating from Yale. He served as U.S. commercial attache in Beijing from 1982 to 1984 and is a partner in the New York firm Shearman & Sterling.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | HENRY CHU and MAGGIE FARLEY and ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chinese protesters infuriated by the deadly NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia continued violent demonstrations into their third day today, attacking American diplomatic missions across the country and trapping the American ambassador inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. "No question that we're hostages here," James R. Sasser told CBS-TV's "Face the Nation" by telephone on Sunday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From United Press International
China on Wednesday dismissed as "speculation" the reports of a deal to free the country's leading dissident from refuge in the U.S. Embassy, but Western diplomats and Chinese sources said the negotiations are continuing. "The recent rumors about the question of Fang Lizhi floating around abroad and overseas are speculation pure and simple," the Chinese Foreign Ministry statement said, reiterating that the embassy refuge was "interference in China's internal affairs."
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Reuters
China will allow dissident Fang Lizhi to leave the U.S. Embassy in Beijing where he has been since June and travel to Australia before the end of this month, a Hong Kong magazine said Tuesday. Both the American and Australian consulates in Hong Kong declined to comment on the report. The magazine Pai Shing, without revealing its sources, said a preliminary understanding was reached during a visit to Beijing in December by U.S. National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft.
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