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United States Embassies El Salvador

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NEWS
September 27, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
When William G. Walker was nominated earlier this year as the U.S. ambassador to El Salvador, the former UCLA art student asked several old art-school friends in Southern California to lend him some of their paintings to decorate his embassy. "They wouldn't do it," Walker said with an air of amazement. "They seemed to think I was going down there with a secret mandate from the President to kill people." Walker, 53, embodies many of the paradoxes of U.S.
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NEWS
May 4, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ambassador William Walker moved into the giant new U.S. Embassy here shortly after a cease-fire ended El Salvador's 12-year civil war, one of his first guests was Joaquin Villalobos, a powerful leader of the anti-government guerrilla movement, the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front. As they toured the fortress-like complex on the city's western outskirts, Walker turned to Villalobos, whose forces had attacked the old embassy more than once, and said: "Welcome to a monument to you."
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NEWS
May 4, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ambassador William Walker moved into the giant new U.S. Embassy here shortly after a cease-fire ended El Salvador's 12-year civil war, one of his first guests was Joaquin Villalobos, a powerful leader of the anti-government guerrilla movement, the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front. As they toured the fortress-like complex on the city's western outskirts, Walker turned to Villalobos, whose forces had attacked the old embassy more than once, and said: "Welcome to a monument to you."
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Embassy officials are increasingly frustrated and concerned over the slow pace of the Salvadoran government's investigation of the deaths of six Jesuit priests and two other people, allegedly killed at the direction of high-ranking army officers.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | From Reuters
About 1,000 students protesting the abduction of a university staff union leader burned a bonfire of old automobile tires at the gate of the American Embassy here Thursday. The students blamed President Jose Napoleon Duarte's government and his U.S. backers for the seizure of Jorge Salvador Ubua, secretary of the Coordinating Committee of University Workers, and for other acts of repression. U.S.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist guerrillas took over mansions in San Salvador's elegant western suburbs Wednesday, temporarily trapping scores of Americans, foreign diplomats and rich Salvadorans in a sudden resurgence of urban warfare. The army surrounded the area with light tanks and ground troops but was held at bay by rebel sniper fire until after dark. American officials closed the U.S. Embassy and encouraged the 270 dependents of embassy personnel to leave El Salvador on charter flights starting today.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Embassy officials are increasingly frustrated and concerned over the slow pace of the Salvadoran government's investigation of the deaths of six Jesuit priests and two other people, allegedly killed at the direction of high-ranking army officers.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist guerrillas took over mansions in San Salvador's elegant western suburbs Wednesday, temporarily trapping scores of Americans, foreign diplomats and rich Salvadorans in a sudden resurgence of urban warfare. The army surrounded the area with light tanks and ground troops but was held at bay by rebel sniper fire until after dark. American officials closed the U.S. Embassy and encouraged the 270 dependents of embassy personnel to leave El Salvador on charter flights starting today.
NEWS
September 27, 1988 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
When William G. Walker was nominated earlier this year as the U.S. ambassador to El Salvador, the former UCLA art student asked several old art-school friends in Southern California to lend him some of their paintings to decorate his embassy. "They wouldn't do it," Walker said with an air of amazement. "They seemed to think I was going down there with a secret mandate from the President to kill people." Walker, 53, embodies many of the paradoxes of U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | From Reuters
About 1,000 students protesting the abduction of a university staff union leader burned a bonfire of old automobile tires at the gate of the American Embassy here Thursday. The students blamed President Jose Napoleon Duarte's government and his U.S. backers for the seizure of Jorge Salvador Ubua, secretary of the Coordinating Committee of University Workers, and for other acts of repression. U.S.
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